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Planning department shopping list

Suburb Repairman

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Hi Folks,

As I mentioned before, I'm setting up a community development dept in my city. This thread kinda builds off of Poncho's thread on budgeting.

I want to begin building the reference library for the department, and want to know what do you think are some of the essential references I should purchase?
 

Budgie

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Suburb Repairman said:
I want to begin building the reference library for the department, and want to know what do you think are some of the essential references I should purchase?
If you deal at all with level of service, benchmarking or service performance evaluation, Municipal Benchmarking by David N. Ammons is a must. It's a bit pricey but well worth it in my opinion. See the link below.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...f=sr_1_2/102-7370899-1764103?v=glance&s=books
 

Repo Man

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Though many question its relevance, I would recommend the Green Bible. "The Practice of Local Government Planning" Also I would get a trip generation manual. Depending on what type of a community you are living in I would also recommend various books on issues that you think are important.

The cool thing about the internet is that you can find all kinds of free publications on all kinds of planning subjects, such as implementing Bicycle and Pedestrian facilities, Smart Growth Planning, Establishing Sign Guidelines, etc. I have probably gotten more from internet documents and documents gotten from other communities than any reference book.
 

Lee Nellis

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It depends on your jurisdiction. The green bible is basically useless outside metro areas. If you are rural you need a copy of our book The Planning for Results Guidebook, which may be ordered for a mere $12 from the National Ass'n of Counties. Much of it is applicable in cities, too.

A trip generation manual is good, or get it in software form. Likewise you will need some parking generation references from APA or ITE. Street standard manuals from AASHTO are also good references. And don't forget all of the relevant statutes and administrative rules in your state.
 

Cardinal

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Repo is right in saying that there is an incredible abount of good information in PDF files on the net. Federal departments like DOT have several books you can order for free. The best I have seen is Flexibility in Highway Design.

ULI has many great books. A few are:

Professional Real Estate Development
Mixed-Use Development Handbook
Business and Industrial Park Handbook
Retail as a Catalyst for Economic Development
Urban Parks and Open Space

I would also recommend getting 3-4 good books about landscaping. Be sure to cover plants. I recommend Dirr's Hardy Trees and Shrubs.

The Old Way of Seeing, by Jonathan Hale, is perhaps the best book I have read that explains what makes good architecture.
 

michaelskis

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Repo Man said:
Green Bible. "The Practice of Local Government Planning"
I thought that most people would have kept there copy from college. It was recommended to each of us, so it now is sitting on my shelf. Others would include “Land Use Law” “Job of the Practicing Planner” and “ Death and Life of Great American Cities”

You might also want to check with a few college professors, flip through the APA book service, then see if you can get them other places for less money.
 

RandomPlanner

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I use The New Illustrated Book of Development Definitions by Harvey S Moskowitz and Carl G Lindbloom at least once or twice a week, but I imagine any comprehensive illustrated site plan dictionary or sorts would be well worth it!
 

Suburb Repairman

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RandomPlanner... said:
I use The New Illustrated Book of Development Definitions by Harvey S Moskowitz and Carl G Lindbloom at least once or twice a week, but I imagine any comprehensive illustrated site plan dictionary or sorts would be well worth it!
and one of my threads returns from the dead! :-D

This is actually one of the books I purchased for my personal library at home that has since found a happy spot under my desk at work. Very useful for explaining things to citizens that are more visual.
 
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