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Preservation Preventing Demolition

ajacks13

Cyburbian
Messages
20
Points
2
Is anyone aware of an effective way to curb residential teardowns by discouraging demolition? Most of the techniques being used by municipalities focus on modifying bulk requirements and establishing design review committees to control what goes up in its place. I'm looking for strategies that try to address how to keep the buildings from being torn down in the first place.

Any thoughts?
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Other than registering it on a National Registry, you can't prevent someone from tearing down a building on their property.

And if you try to pull some rezoning thing where the existing can stay as an existing non conformity, but a new building would never meet the zoning regs you're going to get sued real quick.

IMHO, you are fighting a losing battle. If a property owner wants to take a building down, it's coming down. These building have a tendency to get struck by lightening on clear nights in November if you know what I mean.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Last place I worked was big on historic preservation, but was strongly in favor of land owners rights. The result was a "Historic Conservation District" that had no regulatory techniques, but raised awareness through neighborhood programming and distribution of educational materials. No tteth, but over time it was effective.
 

Wannaplan?

Galactic Superstar
Messages
3,143
Points
27
How about an amendment to the tax code?

Tax the sh** out of the structures!

The new tax law could include rules about the date of new construction with the stipulation that if a previous dwelling was torn-down the new assesment would include the assesment in perpetuity of the old structure plus the assesment of the new structure.
 

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
5,398
Points
32
Mike DeVuono said:
Other than registering it on a National Registry, you can't prevent someone from tearing down a building on their property.

You can't even stop them then, we had several registered buildings torn down in the last couple of years
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
True, you can't completely prevent a building from coming down if it is registered, but it makes it alot harder.

Hell, around here they just move the historic buildings to another location if they need the land for something.
 

lowlyplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
69
Points
4
Pretty much the only option that works is a Local Historic District - the National Register doesn't really provide protection at all... With the historic district you're getting into pretty serious design review of everything - materials, additions, often windows, and demolitions. They usually have to be established by a vote of the neighborhood.
 

ambmason

Cyburbian
Messages
46
Points
2
check your enabling legislation (or call your state historic preservation office) to find out about the particulars of local designation in your area. In most cases you can set up design review to cover as much or as little as you want. No all areas require resident approval, though most prefer to have at least a majority approve of the designation.
In our historic districts demolition can be denied for structures listed as contributing or deferred for 180 days to allow for relocation. We also have a provision to limit land use approvals for up to two years for any building in the area torn down without design approval. We require applications for demolition to document when the building was built, provide engineered certification to the building status when the claim is that it is beyond repair, and tell us what the property will be used for after the demolition.
This only works if the building inspectors stay on top of things and don't let them get down to real safety issues. We are required to bypass design approval for demolition when property is ordered to be removed.
 
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