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Products synonymous with a state or city

Maister

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I am eating a cup of Virginia peanuts at the moment. I know they're from Virginia because the package clearly identifies the peanuts as being Virginia peanuts. I guess Virginia's peanuts are a fairly well known export, but it gets me wondering how many other states (or cities) have products that are very strongly identified with their place of origin? You've got Maine lobsters, Philadelphia cheese steak sandwiches, Florida oranges, Idaho potatoes.....what other places are closely associated with a particular product?

I am eating a cup of Virginia peanuts at the moment. I know they're from Virginia because the package clearly identifies the peanuts as being Virginia peanuts.
"Virginia" peanuts are a type of peanut, not necessarily a regional identifier (they aren't just grown in Virginia).

Maryland crab cakes
Hershey (PA) chocolate
Kentucky bourbon
Kentucky Hot Brown sandwich

New Orleans- beignets

Taylor Ham/Pork Roll
The Sopranos

Virginia tobacco and also Connecticut shade grown tobacco. Louisiana is also known for perique tobacco.

New Mexico for the hatch peppers.
California raisins? Does that count?
Arizona is just not known for food unless you count odd things like mesquite bean flour or cactus leaves. Prickly pear anything is also another good one, but you can get that in California just as easy. SoCal, not that hippie north Cal place.

I'm going to add to my Jersey list...

The Shore
Diners

California raisins? Does that count?
I heard it through the grape fine that they do.


Omaha Steaks
Michigan Apples
New York Cheesecake
Chicago Pizza (not NY)
Wisconsin Cheese
Traverse City Cherries
Yooper Pasties
NC BBQ


It is a shame that Napa Valley CA does not have anything meaningful that anyone cares about.

It is a shame that Napa Valley CA does not have anything meaningful that anyone cares about.
I don't know maybe they've got artisans who are talented with macramé. 'Napa Valley macramé' has a nice ring to it.


a few more:
Delaware corporations
Boston baked beans

Chicken wings.

Florida - Keey Lime Pie.

Floirda - Key Lime Pie.

Napa Valley Wine

Napa Valley Wine
There's hundreds of appellations in the US (I live in one of them -- there's about 50 wineries within 30 miles of my house), and thousands on the planet. Good wine isn't something that's exclusive to France, California, or any one region anymore.

In the US, wine is marketed by the grape first, and appellation second. For example, a Cabernet Sauvignon from the Napa Valley, or a Reisling from the east shore of Seneca Lake. In France, it's just the appellation. For example, a Bordeaux is a wine made from a blend of grape varieties grown in the Bordeaux region. Single grape wines from France are really uncommon.

That said ...

  • Buffalo wings, of course.
  • Syracuse salt potatoes.
  • Hatch (New Mexico) Chile.
  • Kansas City / Memphis barbecue.
  • Cape Cod starter houses.
  • Texas prisons.
  • Louisville Slugger baseball bats.
  • Rochester = photography and optical technologies (before 2000).
  • Detroit = cars.
  • Pennsylvania = junk/snack food (at least in the Northeastern US)
  • Milwaukee, St Louis = beer (macro)


Buffalo wings, of course.
I'm shocked and disappointed that you, a Buffalonian, don't realize that buffalo don't have wings! :wow:

New Jersey tomatoes are actually, arguably, the best in the nation. Having that distinction is heavily publicized, and remains the pride of South Jersey (but Camden, Atlantic City and MTV's "Jersey Shore" still remain in the Top 5).

I'm from North Jersey/The New York-Newark Metro area so... Newark is the home of Prudential Insurance.

Other things associated with New Jersey: Campbell's Soup, The Jersey Devil, The Pine Barrens, Frank Sinatra (from Hoboken...pre-gentried Hoboken, which explains the infamous mugshot pic), Bruce Springsteen, Bon Jovi, Anthony Bourdain, Cory Booker, Thomas Edison (his factories, house, plus a large town that's named after him), The Revolutionary War (especially Morristown and Trenton), and Wawa (in South Jersey).

Was NYC pizza mentioned? NYC/NJ/CT bagels?

Chicago Deep Dish Pizza. Pittsburgh is known for Primanti Bros. Sandwiches (they're served with french fries in the actual sandwich).

That's all I can come up with that wasn't mentioned already, for now.

Iowa Corn? Does Rice-A-Roni count as the San Francisco treat? Haha!
Speaking of which, SF is also associated with the Golden Gate Bridge, Trolley Cars and hills.
It also is one of the only cities in the world where, more or less, half of the city identifies as queer, however I don't know if those figures have changed in the past 10 years. Interested to see, actually.

Boston (or NE) - Lobster Roll, Harvard
Attica - The prison and subsequent, historic uprising
Mississippi Delta - Blues
NYC Hot Dogs

NYC Hot Dogs
Hot dogs are a weird one. It seems like a lot of cities have their own version of hot dogs, sometimes named for other areas. In Buffalo, NY, there are "Texas hots". In Detroit there are "Coneys", a nod to Coney Island, NY. Chicago has its own style of hot dog with a ton of toppings. There are all kinds of regional variations. I don't think you can really tie hot dogs to any one area (even if the hot dog on a bun concept originated in NYC, or St. Louis, or Chicago, depending on who you want to believe).

Hot dogs are a weird one. It seems like a lot of cities have their own version of hot dogs, sometimes named for other areas. In Buffalo, NY, there are "Texas hots". In Detroit there are "Coneys", a nod to Coney Island, NY. Chicago has its own style of hot dog with a ton of toppings. There are all kinds of regional variations. I don't think you can really tie hot dogs to any one area (even if the hot dog on a bun concept originated in NYC, or St. Louis, or Chicago, depending on who you want to believe).
As noted by Eric Kaplan, pizza is much like that too. You've got several distinctive styles originating from places like: Chicago, Detroit, NYC, Buffalo, or California. There's also a wide variety of signature sandwiches as well.

Hot dogs are a weird one. It seems like a lot of cities have their own version of hot dogs, sometimes named for other areas. In Buffalo, NY, there are "Texas hots". In Detroit there are "Coneys", a nod to Coney Island, NY. Chicago has its own style of hot dog with a ton of toppings. There are all kinds of regional variations. I don't think you can really tie hot dogs to any one area (even if the hot dog on a bun concept originated in NYC, or St. Louis, or Chicago, depending on who you want to believe).
The late, great Anthony Bourdain (RIP) had several themes that ran through all of the iterations of his television shows, one of which was regional and national versions of making and consuming "meat in a tube form."

As noted by Eric Kaplan, pizza is much like that too. You've got several distinctive styles originating from places like: Chicago, Detroit, NYC, Buffalo, or California. There's also a wide variety of signature sandwiches as well.
Yep, and you pick up bits and pieces from everywhere you live.

In my case: Buffalo pizza- I find this hard to characterize but I know it when I see it. One characteristic is "cup & char" pepperoni, plus a bready, crispy crust and a slightly sweet sauce. There is also Sicilian pizza in Buffalo which is rectangular, not round, and is on a thick and airy bread dough crust and possibly even sweeter sauce. Sandwiches include Beef on Week, Fried Bologna, and some subs.

I went to college near Albany, NY. I don't remember a distinctive pizza style (basically variations between NYC and Buffalo, depending on where you get it), but they had some unique sandwiches including the Ted's Fish Fry, a long fish fillet in a corn batter, served on a hot dog bun, and Little Hot Dogs- slightly larger than Vienna sausages, served on tiny buns, you order them by the half dozen. All the way includes chilli, cheese, onions, relish and mustard.

When I lived in Detroit, pizza was dominated by Little Caesar's and Domino's which are both headquartered in the region. I would say Little Caeser's in Detroit is a lot better than outside of their home area. There's also a square pizza style with a doughy crust, similar to Buffalo Sicilian but distinct from that style. Sandwich I would go with a Coney dog.

Fort Worth, pizza-wise, is pretty generic. There's a place that does true Buffalo style that I frequent, but other people without Buffalo ties seems to like the pizzerias that serve Neapolitan style pizza (which is similar to what I was served in Rome- thin but doughy, not crispy, crust and fresh toppings). Sandwich would be the chopped BBQ brisket sandwich, but the hamburger culture is strong here, too.

Yep, and you pick up bits and pieces from everywhere you live.

In my case: Buffalo pizza- I find this hard to characterize but I know it when I see it. One characteristic is "cup & char" pepperoni, plus a bready, crispy crust and a slightly sweet sauce. There is also Sicilian pizza in Buffalo which is rectangular, not round, and is on a thick and airy bread dough crust and possibly even sweeter sauce. Sandwiches include Beef on Week, Fried Bologna, and some subs.

I went to college near Albany, NY. I don't remember a distinctive pizza style (basically variations between NYC and Buffalo, depending on where you get it), but they had some unique sandwiches including the Ted's Fish Fry, a long fish fillet in a corn batter, served on a hot dog bun, and Little Hot Dogs- slightly larger than Vienna sausages, served on tiny buns, you order them by the half dozen. All the way includes chilli, cheese, onions, relish and mustard.

When I lived in Detroit, pizza was dominated by Little Caesar's and Domino's which are both headquartered in the region. I would say Little Caeser's in Detroit is a lot better than outside of their home area. There's also a square pizza style with a doughy crust, similar to Buffalo Sicilian but distinct from that style. Sandwich I would go with a Coney dog.

Fort Worth, pizza-wise, is pretty generic. There's a place that does true Buffalo style that I frequent, but other people without Buffalo ties seems to like the pizzerias that serve Neapolitan style pizza (which is similar to what I was served in Rome- thin but doughy, not crispy, crust and fresh toppings). Sandwich would be the chopped BBQ brisket sandwich, but the hamburger culture is strong here, too.
Off-topic somewhat — here’s a good article about the style.


I’d flip the description. Buffalo-style pizza is typically a cup-and-char pepperoni pizza, one with a slim, sometimes non-existent crust coastline with ingredients out to, and sometimes even over the edges, a thick, airy undercarriage with little to no structural integrity that’s topped by a sweet sauce and enough cheese to nearly always guarantee a cheese pull. If you were going to use other regional styles to describe it, I’d say it’s a Detroit amount of cheese with a Motor City trim, a Maine undercarriage (think Portland’s Micucci’s or Slab), and a New York City soul.
One of my favorite pizza experts, a Buffalonianpizza expert who has anonymously reviewed about 100 of the city’s pizzas (he’s shooting to have reviewed 150 by the end of 2018), and who goes by the handle SexySlices, defines Buffalo-style pizza thusly:
“It has to have cup-and-char pepperoni with grease in the center of each cup and blackening on the top along the rim. A hefty portion of cheese with good browning (some places make it super-dark). Buffalo-style is traditionally an overdone pie, and ordering ‘well-done’ on top of that is common. The sauce is rich, ladled generously, and a little sweet. It has a thick dough that fluffs up consistently to the edge of a crispy, buttery crust that’s typically charred and caked in excess with a super intense, oven-dried sauce.”
When I lived in Detroit, pizza was dominated by Little Caesar's and Domino's which are both headquartered in the region...
Interestingly, neither of these chains typifies what most consider to be 'Detroit style pizza'

here’s a good article about the style.
I thought of pulling that article in but didn't take the time. ;)

Interestingly, neither of these chains typifies what most consider to be 'Detroit style pizza'
No, it's really the rectangular stuff you get from the mom & pop restaurants, isn't it?
 
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