• We're a fun, friendly, and diverse group of planners, placemakers, built environment shapers, students, and other folks who found their people here. Create your FREE Cyburbia ID, and join us today! Register through your Reddit, Facebook, Google, Twitter, or Microsoft account, or use your email address.

Question About Location When Applying

rover

Cyburbian
Messages
111
Points
6
I'm currently looking for full time in a variety of areas over the country.
I'm concerned by being 'out of market' for many, I am being passed over for consideration.

In all of the markets I am applying, I have friends/family, and was wondering if it would be beneficial for me, if prompted for an address, to just give their local address (as I have their permission).

On the plus side, this may allow me the opportunity to interview when I would have been passed over, but on the downside I'm not sure if an employer would see this as deceiving and worse, consider me a liar.

If approached for an interview, I would inquire if it would be in person or over the phone, and I would emphasize that relocation in short order would not be of concern as I have to place to stay.
Basically:

1) Is this worth a shot?
2) What should I say if asked to interview?
-The truth, that I am seeking to relocate nearby, I have friend/family I can stay with?

Thanks.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,354
Points
37
When you have your address in the cover letterhead, have 2 addresses and one is labeled:

Local Address:
blah blah blah
blah blah 29u940

so it is subtle, but shows you have local interest.

Also state in your cover letter that you have family/friends nearby and are looking into relocating there.
 

8hesaid

Cyburbian
Messages
68
Points
4
I can vouch that having a "local address" on my resume and cover letter helped me get several out-of-state interviews, so go for it!
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,654
Points
38
Definitely add something in your cover letter about your local knowledge and reason for wanting to be there. I used to live there, went to college there, have family there, etc.

Make sure to add some local knowledge of some kind. I skip the latest project and talk about how the community has changed or something like that.

On the address side, I like LPs idea of residence address and temporary local address. Just be ready to interview in person more often or to explain what the deal is with two addresses.
 

Reefe

Cyburbian
Messages
68
Points
4
I had a candidate who listed a local address but was currently working in a different state - all clearly shown on their resume. As others have suggested, the key is certainly to say (in your cover letter and elsewhere) why you want the job, make it clear that you would accept the job and relocate, and show some knowledge of the local situation as bonus. My candidate said their spouse and child lived in the local area, but we later found out the local address listed was a mailbox service. A little strange, but anyway, we ended up not offering this person the position because they couldn't say why they wanted the job other than their spouse and child lived in the area.
 

bentobox34

Cyburbian
Messages
62
Points
4
As someone who just went through a hiring process with a large number of out-of-area applicants, here are some thoughts.
  1. Don't worry, it's not that unusual. People apply to jobs far away, and planning managers know this.
  2. Do say something about why you want to move to that area in the cover letter, but not much more than a sentence or two.
  3. IMO, the "local address" thing is overkill. We know that you actually live near where you currently work.
  4. Do have some thoughts prepared for the interview about the locality, what makes it special, and why you want to work there. People who were unable to say anything specific about this were not considered further.
  5. Regarding your question 2, if asked in an interview, it's unclear why you would say anything other than the truth? Just say why you want to live there. More importantly, say what you know about how the city is developing and what you'll contribute in your role at that agency.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
11,699
Points
36
Many years ago when I was a baby planner, I applied for a job 3 states away. I hadn't heard from the municipality and called for an update. The director said they did not consider me because they couldn't afford to bring there for an interview. I asked if that was the only reason and if I'd be considered if I lived close by, to which he said yes.

I then told them I could be there Monday morning for an interview...I got the job.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,279
Points
43
Many years ago when I was a baby planner, I applied for a job 3 states away. I hadn't heard from the municipality and called for an update. The director said they did not consider me because they couldn't afford to bring there for an interview. I asked if that was the only reason and if I'd be considered if I lived close by, to which he said yes.

I then told them I could be there Monday morning for an interview...I got the job.
When I relocated, I did something similar. They were willing to do a video interview, but I told them that I could be there in person. I drove 13 hours each way, two nights at a hotel on my dime, and it was the best investment I could have made.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
314
Points
14
I think the cover letter statement that explains the connection/desire to relocate is helpful. I moved cross-country to take the job I have now, and made it clear that it would be a move to a place i have a connection with.

Now that I'm on the hiring side, I do feel a bit biased toward local candidates, just for the ease of interviewing, and after some barely intelligible conference-call phone interviews, it's in-person or Skype for me. Anybody looking for a job in my shop needs to be capable enough to figure out Skype!

Most importantly, I ask candidates I interview what it is about this place that interests them, that they have questions about, that attracts them to this region/municipality. Applicants who can't at a minimum show some curiosity or interest in the place get turfed. You need a reason to be here to carry you through the tough stuff.

So my advice is, when applying from far away, state a connection, show some interest in what's going on locally that Planning might be involved in, show that you'll be engaged. By the time the interview happens, I know the qualifications are there. As much as anything, i want to know if i'm going to want to work with you 300 days a year!
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
4,797
Points
28
Yep, content of the cover letter is very important in these situations. I'll have to dig up my cover letter for the job I start after Labor Day on the other side of the country, but I had enough in it (both on my interest in the job and the unique parts of my skill set) to get the attention of the hiring manager.
 
Top