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Rain Handlers

Gedunker

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I have no personal exeprience with this product. I would be very careful about the company's claims, however.

You want to protect your foundation first and foremost, so I would ask how the product would move water away from your foundation (or slab, as the case may be). Depending on many factors (roof form, pitch, materials, as well as site considerations of slope, drainage systems, landscaping and so forth), they may do nothing but introduce water where you least want it.

Cleaning gutters is a dreadful (and sometimes dangerous) task. That's why these companies keep asserting the "permanent fix". Do you know any contractors in your area that have installed them? That'd be the best way to find out how they perform.

Good luck.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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I would agree with Gedunker. I think I've seen this "rain handler" thing somewhere, and my first question was "how does this help move water AWAY from my house?".

My plan is to install these wire mesh panels over the eavestroughs. They stop the leaves and crap entering the gutter, and they have little hooks on the them so you can use some implement to "flip" the panel over and dump the leaves. All while you stand safely on the ground. Being a first-time homeowner, last year was the first time I had to clean out the eavestroughs. It took me a while (and my wife threatening to do it herself) for me to work up the courage to step off the ladder and onto the roof. Thank god I only have a bungalow!!
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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Tranplanner said:
It took me a while (and my wife threatening to do it herself) for me to work up the courage to step off the ladder and onto the roof. Thank god I only have a bungalow!!
You're joking, right? I cleaned the gutters from my parent's ranch house and it was no problem, except be careful around the powerlines.

Now the 3-story Victorian we lived in when I was in high school was a different matter. Grow little trees, grow.
 

donk

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Tranplanner said:
I would agree with Gedunker. Thank god I only have a bungalow!!
With a low pitched roof that is not very high off the ground. I won't say my irrational home owner fear.
 

Gedunker

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I need a 32' extension ladder to paint my house. First time, and I'm just getting used to being up there, the ladder starts shaking. I'm thinking WTF? I look down and one of my wife's cats is climbing the ladder. Now I'm up there with a paint pot in one hand, brush in the other, and I do not want the cat up on the roof. The brush ended up in my mouth, the paint pot and cat in my left hand, and my right hand to climb down the ladder. The cat is meowing like bloody murder the whole time.

So "killing kittens" has meant different things to me at different times :-D
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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mendelman said:
You're joking, right?
No, I hate open heights. I'm okay on the ladder (when I have something to cling to), but as soon as I try to step off the ladder and on to the roof, I freeze. Next year hopefully won't be as bad seeing as I've managed to do it now.
 
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