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RTDNTOTO 🐻 Random Thoughts Deserving No Thread of Their Own 14 (2019)

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mendelman

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You must provide four sentences of commentary on that trailer. Go.....
I like the collapsing barn aesthetic.

Egon Spengler was the true hero of the first two movies and, therefore, having his progeny reclaim the mantle is appropriate.

Paul Rudd.

No exposition comparing specific snack foods to the scale of the film's climactic crisis?
 
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kjel

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I look at the Pelaton ad like medical ads. I mock them mercilessly when I can, but I'm not offended. If I get a Pelaton you're saying I will be an anxious 30 something skinny woman who feels I need to lose weight? If I take whatever drug I'll have an elephant hanging out with me? I'm more offended by things like tampon ads. Oh, I've got one and I suddenly feel like horseback riding. Not having any experience, but I don't think that's how it works.
The new ad for Ryan Reynold's Aviation Gin features the same actress in the Peloton ad and is troll level expert.

 

Dan

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I'm just going to start adding my own backstory to the Peloton ad.
Husband and wife: live in a house like this in Scarsdale, New Canaan, Glencoe, Edina, or Boulder County. That, or they're at their weekend home in the Berkshires.

Wife: Comments about every Peloton ad that airs. Always mentions that all her friends own a Peloton. Spends $160/month for an OrangeTheory membership, $150/month for a YogaWorks membership, and $120/month for an LA Fitness membership. Gets excited when pumpkin spice season rolls around, loves to travel, documents her life on Facebook, drinks white wine, wears her hair in a ponytail through a baseball cap when she goes out, was a Chi-O or Tri-Delt in college, and adds an "uh" at the end of her sentences when she's excited.

Husband: some kind of finance or law career. Probably entertainment or patent law. Takes the "hint hint" from his wife, and buys her a Peloton. He also got her an E at Equinox membership and a Birkin bag. Her last Christmas present was a Lexus LS with a bow, and a month-long trip to Patagonia.

The wife looks stressed out because she ran the Spartan Ultra in 11 hours, while her BFFs topped out at ten and a half, and OMG she needs to catch up, because OMG what will they think-uh?
 

TOFB

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The spirit of curling!

'View attachment 47207

It's been about 10 years since I last curled on dedicated ice. It's fast, and I had a hard time adjusting my muscle memory. I sailed a lot of rocks through the house in the first four or five ends. Anyhow, our rink was clobbered in the first draw, and we won the second draw.
I haven't curled in 30 years and still dream about it.
 
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kms

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I really wish the Elf on the Shelf was never a thing...
It’s only a thing because you or your wife brought one into the house.

So, what’s the bad behavior threshold? Will “Santa” really skip your child if he is naughty? I’d have never subjected my kids, or myself, to Elf in a Shelf.
 

Doohickie

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Wife: Comments about every Peloton ad that airs. Always mentions that all her friends own a Peloton. Spends $160/month for an OrangeTheory membership, $150/month for a YogaWorks membership, and $120/month for an LA Fitness membership. Gets excited when pumpkin spice season rolls around, loves to travel, documents her life on Facebook, drinks white wine, wears her hair in a ponytail through a baseball cap when she goes out, was a Chi-O or Tri-Delt in college, and adds an "uh" at the end of her sentences when she's excited.
Name: Karen.
 

Whose Yur Planner

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After years of hearing people yap about comic books, I broke down and downloaded "A Killing Joke" one of the supposed seminal works. It was dark, weird gritty and simplistic. I don't get it. I read comic way back in the '70s when I was a kid. I was fan of X-Men. I've seen most of the superhero movies. Again, just I don't get the appeal.
So I broke down and bought Watchman after seeing reviews. It's supposedly in the top 100 of literature. Plus, I remember the era it's set in. It's ok and parts are pretty good. However, I form my own mental pictures when I read a book. I guess I don't like people messing with the mental pictures I'm forming. Basically, they are telling me what to dream.
 

AG74683

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So I broke down and bought Watchman after seeing reviews. It's supposedly in the top 100 of literature. Plus, I remember the era it's set in. It's ok and parts are pretty good. However, I form my own mental pictures when I read a book. I guess I don't like people messing with the mental pictures I'm forming. Basically, they are telling me what to dream.
Watch the HBO series now. I started over the weekend. It's a thoroughly WTF show, but so far I've enjoyed it.

IT is coming over shortly to begin preparations for installing new internet service in our offices. It's currently a wi-fi connection to the main servers, which is crap. He's going to have to install all new server hardware in the downstairs closet, where we have been storing all sorts of extra junk (against his wishes). I went to remove all my stuff so I don't get yelled at. I found some giant map from years ago and went to break it down because it serves no purpose anymore. I thought it was regular foam board, but it was some sort of hard board and snapped in half. It sounded like a gunshot.
 

dw914er

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I think the Mensch on a Bench came first.
I have a Mensch on a Bench that someone gave us. Our daughter is too young to know anything about it (9 months), but he's hanging out near our dining room cabinets. I do think the character looks a lot less creepy than the elf on a shelf.
 

Doohickie

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Good ole neighbor dispute

There was a famous "test case" in our historic district, probably a generation ago now. It is, I've been told, the largest residential historic district west of the Mississippi. Anyway, shortly (a few years) after the district was established, a woman put up a chain link fence around her yard, including the front yard. This was not allowed by the historic overly and the district took her to court. The district won, establishing an important precedent for the future of the district. The people who are on the district board now routinely review all building permits along with the city. Nothing gets built unless it meets the historic overlay standards, which include wood, not metal, fencing, wood windows, wood siding, etc. Nothing gets built unless it conforms.

So what happened to the chain link fence? It was removed, but the historic district paid for the new wood fence. The unintended consequence is that there are still several yards with decrepit chain link fences in the neighborhood. Prior to the historic overlay, they were allowed, and they can't force people to remove them, but neither can they repair/update them without conforming to the overlay. So they just stay with the now rusted, really bad looking chain link.
 

Doohickie

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Exactly what a Bill would say.

o_O
I'm kind of a special case I think. I have no sisters, I have no daughters. So my direct female family contacts are limited to my mother, aunts, grandmothers, and my wife. As such, I have no natural empathy for women that is any different than my empathy for men. So when a girl cries to try to get her way with me, it has zero effect. I'm immune.

Does that make me a David?


Edit: btw this immunity made me a natural Sunday school teacher and chaperone on high school band trips.
 

Maister

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Remember shows like American Bandstand, Dance Fever, or Soul Train?...you know, noncompetitive dance shows that featured volunteer/unpaid young adults who were shaking their things in a tv studio just for the sake of being able to say that they were on tv.

What purpose did they serve? And who and why the heck would anyone watch them?

Image result for soul train intro
 

luckless pedestrian

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Remember shows like American Bandstand, Dance Fever, or Soul Train?...you know, noncompetitive dance shows that featured volunteer/unpaid young adults who were shaking their things in a tv studio just for the sake of being able to say that they were on tv.

What purpose did they serve? And who and why the heck would anyone watch them?

Image result for soul train intro

I watched all of those shows lol
 

Doohickie

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What purpose did they serve?
It was the early prototype for MTV. It was a way to put music on a visual medium. The dancers were, perhaps, the most important features of the shows because it showed viewers proper behavior for listening to the music, thereby building the desire of the viewers to buy the records they played on those shows (and you know they rarely actually performed, they just lip-synched).
 
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JNA

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Maister

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It was the early prototype for MTV. It was a way to put music on a visual medium. The dancers were, perhaps, the most important features of the shows because it showed viewers proper behavior for listening to the music, thereby building the desire of the viewers to buy the records they played on those shows (and you know they rarely actually performed, they just lip-synched).
Thank you for your prompt and highly informative response...however, you posted too soon as we were in the process of trying to encourage LP into making some potentially embarrassing confessions. She may yet if we remain still and quiet....
 

luckless pedestrian

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Well for one thing - I was a 70's kid/pre-teen/teen so it was all about tv and music so watching people dance to the latest music was fun

TV was just 3 networks and PBS and that was it - so you watched what was on or what your parents allowed

So we got cable in the late 70's I believe and we didn't get a color tv until 1972
 

kjel

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I'm thinking more like Lauren, Emily, Megan, or Rachel. Here's Karen from her glory years,

I think she snorted a few lines, was feeling cute, and decided to make some exercise videos.
 

luckless pedestrian

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when people post the word passion as part of the job they are seeking on LinkedIn, I always want to write to them and say "screw passion, no shame in workin for the weekend!" but alas I don't do that
 

Doohickie

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TV was just 3 networks and PBS
I love how no one who was around during those days (myself included) counts PBS as a network :p

You sound like us wrt to color TV and cable. I remember my dad didn't want to get cable so we'd go to relatives' houses to watch the Buffalo Sabres games. I also remember going to friend's homes to watch the moon landing so we could see the black & white video from the moon on a color TV.

I recently watched a CNN series about the '70s on Netflix. They had a great description of TV up through the 1970s: Campfire TV, meaning we all sat around the campfire (the TV) and all watched the same show. Starting in the late 1970s people started getting additional TVs in bedrooms, family rooms, etc.
 

TOFB

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Our lead signer is a veteran of these shows. And Rena Day (female vocalist) was our special guest Saturday. Both still have great pipes.

We still do both tunes.

 

Hink

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when people post the word passion as part of the job they are seeking on LinkedIn, I always want to write to them and say "screw passion, no shame in workin for the weekend!" but alas I don't do that
I want someone to put "will do all the work asked of me without complaint, and will work night meetings when asked without trying to find excuses constantly".

Or just stick with "Understands the Microsoft Office Suite".... I mean there are some who don't at this point... right? Right? Errr....
 

Doohickie

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And there are various levels of proficiency. I work with Excel a LOT. I am really good at cutting data up with pivot tables; to me it's like falling off a log. But if I have to do something with macros? Heaven help me.
 

mendelman

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And there are various levels of proficiency. I work with Excel a LOT. I am really good at cutting data up with pivot tables; to me it's like falling off a log. But if I have to do something with macros? Heaven help me.
Understood. But I still run into adult professionals older than me that need fundamental help.
 

dw914er

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I want someone to put "will do all the work asked of me without complaint, and will work night meetings when asked without trying to find excuses constantly".

Or just stick with "Understands the Microsoft Office Suite".... I mean there are some who don't at this point... right? Right? Errr....
Seriously, you just press tab and enter a bunch of times to format a document... how hard is that. o_Oo_O
 

Maister

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They had a great description of TV up through the 1970s: Campfire TV, meaning we all sat around the campfire (the TV) and all watched the same show. Starting in the late 1970s people started getting additional TVs in bedrooms, family rooms, etc.
I like this concept, and it seems to be an apt description. Before the 80's everyone watched the same shows, experienced the same news, but when cable became popular - and certainly by the time streaming services began - everyone is now watching something different. We seem to have less shared experiences. We have less in common. There are less things tying us together as a culture.
 

JNA

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But I still run into adult professionals older than me that need fundamental help.
I am one of them,
Damn that 8 year gap between schools where I never had/ anything to do with/ use a computer.

Now get off my lawn.
 
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Faust_Motel

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I want someone to put "will do all the work asked of me without complaint, and will work night meetings when asked without trying to find excuses constantly".

Or just stick with "Understands the Microsoft Office Suite".... I mean there are some who don't at this point... right? Right? Errr....
I love it when people are passionate, creative, innovative, fun to work with, etc, etc.

...but none of that means a thing to me if they can't manage to show up where and when they are supposed to.

...or if they make up office procedures on the fly without asking because the way we do it "feels stodgy" or is "too complicated." Sometimes there's a damn good reason why we do things the way they do them- maybe it's boring 90% of the time but the procedure is designed to deal with the edge cases that become huge headaches if they don't get addressed.
 

mendelman

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...or if they make up office procedures on the fly without asking because the way we do it "feels stodgy" or is "too complicated." Sometimes there's a damn good reason why we do things the way they do them- maybe it's boring 90% of the time but the procedure is designed to deal with the edge cases that become huge headaches if they don't get addressed.
OK, X-ennial.

;)
 
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Hink

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I love it when people are passionate, creative, innovative, fun to work with, etc, etc.

...but none of that means a thing to me if they can't manage to show up where and when they are supposed to.

...or if they make up office procedures on the fly without asking because the way we do it "feels stodgy" or is "too complicated." Sometimes there's a damn good reason why we do things the way they do them- maybe it's boring 90% of the time but the procedure is designed to deal with the edge cases that become huge headaches if they don't get addressed.
Exactly. You see me.
 

Gedunker

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So, back from a five hour class learning all sorts of valuable first aid stuff, including CPR. First thing I check when I get back to the office - Do we have a first aid kit? Nope, not anywhere on our floor of 11 departments, ~35 people.

We do have an AED, so we have that going for us.

My AA is now pricing first aid kits.
 
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