• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

RTDNTOTO 🐻 Random Thoughts Deserving No Thread of Their Own 15 (2020)

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,021
Points
52
Actual planning question! My neighborhood is up in arms about the golf course being up for auction. The city has nothing that would slow the progress of new housing over the course, but nothing has been proposed at this point. So the big question, how would you break CCRs that have a restriction on the golf course being a golf course. They are fairly well enforced throughout the community, but I'm sure you can find examples of things not enforced.

To be honest, I don't mind if the change it over to new housing. It's not like I live on the golf course and it really doesn't look that great. It would be nice if they reopened the clubhouse though. Maybe with a decent menu. One that doesn't serve a tuna salad sandwich on cinnamon raisin bread.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,824
Points
33
As of last week, I now have an office to myself which is divided into two lovely cubicle spaces, mine being the one viewable from the door. Is it too soon to set up a desk fort on the other side of the room so I can hide out during breaks?
been waiting on an update from ... that other thread.
Having your own office is nice.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,929
Points
52
Happy (my Monday) Tuesday! For those of you who got your Monday out of the way already, kudos. I am deep in it... so yea.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,543
Points
54
Actual planning question! My neighborhood is up in arms about the golf course being up for auction. The city has nothing that would slow the progress of new housing over the course, but nothing has been proposed at this point. So the big question, how would you break CCRs that have a restriction on the golf course being a golf course. They are fairly well enforced throughout the community, but I'm sure you can find examples of things not enforced.

To be honest, I don't mind if the change it over to new housing. It's not like I live on the golf course and it really doesn't look that great. It would be nice if they reopened the clubhouse though. Maybe with a decent menu. One that doesn't serve a tuna salad sandwich on cinnamon raisin bread.

Who is the conservation restriction with - the municipality? A private non-profit?

If it's with the city, then the city likely can vote to remove it but not sure if it's a ballot initiative or the chief elected officials - depends on your charter.

If it's with a non-profit, well, good luck as they likely will never lift it...

If it's just on the deed, then the person who put it on the deed I think is the only person who can remove it?

I don't know, I am just glad this thread went to the next page as the last page was pretty gross :sick: :ttth::ttm::plunger:
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,804
Points
71
Visiting my grandparents as a child was strange. I didn't think it particularly odd when I was young but as I got older many of their practices seemed peculiar to my modern sensibilities. Some examples:
  • clear plastic runners through the carpeted living room. The kind you (more commonly used to) see intended to protect carpeting from customer traffic in furniture store showrooms.
  • plastic covers over the sofa. This one I thought strange even as a kid. It felt odd to sit on the plastic, cold in the winter and sticky in the summer. All to ensure the fabric was never worn.
  • bowls filled with either root beer or coffee flavored hard candies in several rooms
  • designated (marked with an initial) plastic disposable cups intended for the grandkids use whenever they visited. Yes, the disposable plastic cups were washed out and reused many many times. I distinctly remember using the same cup in 5th grade as I did in 1st grade. Adults got to use actual glasses to drink out of. I think that honor was conferred on the grandkids upon reaching teen years.
 
Last edited:

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,463
Points
40
Your grandparents. like mine, were products of the Great Depression. That shaped a lot of how they did things when they got to be adults. Both sets of grandparents did odd things that I attribute to having survived the Depression.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,645
Points
47
Actual planning question! My neighborhood is up in arms about the golf course being up for auction. The city has nothing that would slow the progress of new housing over the course, but nothing has been proposed at this point. So the big question, how would you break CCRs that have a restriction on the golf course being a golf course. They are fairly well enforced throughout the community, but I'm sure you can find examples of things not enforced.

To be honest, I don't mind if the change it over to new housing. It's not like I live on the golf course and it really doesn't look that great. It would be nice if they reopened the clubhouse though. Maybe with a decent menu. One that doesn't serve a tuna salad sandwich on cinnamon raisin bread.

It sounds like the golf course itself violated any sort of CCR by serving tuna salad on cinnamon raisin bread. :sick: If that's not a violation of any sort of deed restriction, it is definitely a violation of human decency and should act as precedent that there doesn't deserve to be a course there.

Visiting my grandparents as a child was strange. I didn't think it particularly odd when I was young but as I got older many of their practices seemed peculiar to my modern sensibilities. Some examples:
  • bowls filled with either root beer or coffee flavored hard candies in several rooms

I always looked forward to those bowls of hard candy - all stuck together of course! My parents actually used to keep those bowls of candy out through the fall and winter until just a few years ago when they both decided to finally cut down on their sugar. My mom would even make her own hard candy after Thanksgiving. Her cinnamon candy was always really good. Maybe I should try my hand at it this holiday season....
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,864
Points
61
Dilbert - about zoom calls



 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,543
Points
54
It sounds like the golf course itself violated any sort of CCR by serving tuna salad on cinnamon raisin bread. :sick: If that's not a violation of any sort of deed restriction, it is definitely a violation of human decency and should act as precedent that there doesn't deserve to be a course there.



I always looked forward to those bowls of hard candy - all stuck together of course! My parents actually used to keep those bowls of candy out through the fall and winter until just a few years ago when they both decided to finally cut down on their sugar. My mom would even make her own hard candy after Thanksgiving. Her cinnamon candy was always really good. Maybe I should try my hand at it this holiday season....

omg that sandwich does sound pretty bad - the only thing that works on cinnamon raisin bread as a sandwich is peanut butter

my parents were the greatest generation members so though we didn't have plastic on the furniture, we always had covers on the couch

my aunt used to have hard candy (and I love the concept of making it yourself and want to learn how to do that) but she also had those melty pastel mints that I also loved - always sugar cubes out with the coffee/tea setup
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,645
Points
47
omg that sandwich does sound pretty bad - the only thing that works on cinnamon raisin bread as a sandwich is peanut butter

my parents were the greatest generation members so though we didn't have plastic on the furniture, we always had covers on the couch

my aunt used to have hard candy (and I love the concept of making it yourself and want to learn how to do that) but she also had those melty pastel mints that I also loved - always sugar cubes out with the coffee/tea setup

I loved those little pastel mints too! There was a diner that we used to go to all the time when I was a kid and they always had a bowl of them near the register and I'd make sure to grab a handful on the way in and out. After doing this once or twice a week for months, the waitresses started to remember me and would bring me a little cup of them as soon as we sat down. I thought they were being nice, but now that I'm older I realize they probably just wanted me to stop continually putting my grubby little hands in there.

My grandma always had those Andes mints on her table because she liked to have a couple with her coffee. When we would visit, I'd be sure to eat my fill of them.

Regarding the cinnamon raisin bread: When Cynthia Nixon was running for mayor of New York a couple of years ago she caused some controversy because somebody noticed that when she'd go into the deli for a bagel, she'd get cream cheese and lox and tomatoes... on a cinnamon raisin bagel.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,021
Points
52
Lucky for me it was the wife who ordered the tuna sandwich not expect raisin bread. I was smart enough to order the ribs that really were not that good, but edible.

It sounds like the CCRs are under the HOA. I'm guessing it would be up to them to release the golf course from the restriction.
 

dw914er

Cyburbian
Messages
1,469
Points
20
Cream cheese on cinnamon raisin bread is actually really good, but adding nova lox doesn't sound like a good pair.

We have a golf course surrounded by homes in our community, and I always wonder if they would replace it with housing - the golf industry has been struggling, and I know that the residential reuse has been explored in other areas.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,563
Points
39
my aunt used to have hard candy (and I love the concept of making it yourself and want to learn how to do that)

Making hard candy was a family tradition of ours. We always made it the Saturday (and sometimes Sunday) after Thanksgiving for the holidays. Mom would blend the candy mix in a pot on the stove, using a candy thermometer to get it to the correct temperature. She would then pour it onto a big piece of marble that we had on the kitchen table. While one side had the candy on it the other side had a roasting pan that we'd filled and frozen so it was ready for the next batch. Then she'd drop in the flavoring and the correct food coloring for the flavor. The stove was always on and the pot heating for the next round. Dad would then use a metal spatula to keep turning it and mixing the color while it cooled a bit. When it got to a certain consistency, approximately the temperature of cooling magma he would then cut it into big chunks and toss them into the powdered sugar that was on the rest of the table on top of cut up paper bags. Everybody then grabbed their scissors and cut the big pieces into the bite size ones. We all had burns and blisters and yet we loved it. We made eight flavors. Because of the food coloring, you'd start with the lightest colors first and work up to the darkest ones so that any residue on the marble didn't show up in the next flavor batch. If I remember correctly our order went like this:
Peppermint - no color
Lemon - yellow
Orange - orange
Wintergreen - pink
Cinnamon - red (we always called that one Big Red)
Spearmint - dark green
Clove - brown (sort of like a horehound)
Anise - black (licorice type flavor)

After each batch was cut up we'd gather the pieces from the sugar into a strainer and then shake the excess back onto the table. Then the candy went into a large lard can. Each flavor was on top of each other so when we were down we'd take turns hoisting the can and flipping and turning it to mix the candy.
 
Last edited:

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,438
Points
40
Making hard candy was a family tradition of ours. We always made it the Saturday (and sometimes Sunday) after Thanksgiving for the holidays. Mom would blend the candy mix in a pot on the stove, using a candy thermometer to get it to the correct temperature. She would then pour it onto a big piece of marble that we had on the kitchen table. While one side had the candy on it the other side had a roasting pan that we'd filled and frozen so it was ready for the next batch. Then she'd drop in the flavoring and the correct food coloring for the flavor. The stove was always on and the pot heating for the next round. Dad would then use a metal spatula to keep turning it and mixing the color while it cooled a bit. When it got to a certain consistency, approximately the temperature of cooling magma he would then cut it into big chunks and toss them into the powdered sugar that was on the rest of the table on top of cut up paper bags. Everybody then grabbed their scissors and cut the big pieces into the bite size ones. We all had burns and blisters and yet we loved it. We made eight flavors. Because of the food coloring, you'd start with the lightest colors first and work up to the darkest ones so that any residue on the marble didn't show up in the next flavor batch. If I remember correctly our order went like this:
Peppermint - no color
Lemon - yellow
Orange - orange
Wintergreen - pink
Cinnamon - red (we always called that one Big Red)
Spearmint - dark green
Clove - brown (sort of like a horehound)
Anise - black (licorice type flavor)

After each batch was cut up we'd gather the pieces from the sugar into a strainer and then shake the excess back onto the table. Then the candy went into a large lard can. Each flavor was on top of each other so when we were down we'd take turns hoisting the can and flipping and turning it to mix the candy.
Hard tack candy. Clove is my favorite flavor. You can keep peppermint.

My mom never made this, bit there's plenty to go around at the holidays. Penn State Extension was in our office building. They had a full kitchen with a vintage marble top table. I watched them make hard tack one year, but they didn't offer me any. They were an odd and aloof bunch.
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
9,444
Points
40
Hubby has begun to hoard TP in preparation for another lockdown. Granted our TP supply was fine the last time but we were limiting our squares.



FX for good news about future adventures (that result in happy and healthy outcomes for the good of all).
 

Big Owl

Cyburbian
Messages
2,693
Points
32
After months of hobbling along my living room tv bit the dust last night. I was able to take advantage of a early amazon prime day deal and order a new one last night. It was supposed to be here at the end of October but it came today.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,645
Points
47
I cleaned my mouse & wow what a difference. It doesn't stick anymore and moves very quickly now.

How do you clean a mouse? Wait, are you saying you have a little ball in your mouse still?

Soap and water and a scrub brush I imagine.

I don't know if the little balls need any special attention. I've never cleaned mice that thoroughly.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,929
Points
52
It's a trackball, not a conventional mouse.

I still call it a mouse. My bad.
Okay. I was just checking on you. I know corona has been hard on all of us, and I thought maybe you decided to just go back to the year 2000.

:roflmao:
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,645
Points
47
I've yet to understand the appeal of the Ford Ranchero and equivalents from other automakers.


I prefer the El Camino to the Ranchero. I think an El Camino would be the best way to haul my bicycle around.

The el Camino was definitely the better looking of the two. I was never really a fan of them though (the Ranchero or the el Camino) but a friend in high school had an el Camino from the early '70s (I think '72 or '73) that was in perfect shape and had the "Super Sport" package with the massive 454 cubic engine. That thing was awesome... but still sort of ugly.

If I had to drive one, I prefer the slightly boxier looks of the ones from the late '70s or early '80s, but those suffered from the weak performance and fuel numbers that a lot of the Big 3 autos experienced in that time frame.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,001
Points
42
my parents were the greatest generation members so though we didn't have plastic on the furniture, we always had covers on the couch

my aunt used to have hard candy (and I love the concept of making it yourself and want to learn how to do that) but she also had those melty pastel mints that I also loved - always sugar cubes out with the coffee/tea setup

My dad was an only child (and his mother lived with us). At Christmas time we would visit several of his aunts and uncles and cousins. His side of the family was kind of like that, with the covered furniture and such. In many cases they were not only grandparents, but great grandparents, although most of their descendants were largely unknown to me, even those my age. I've gotten to know a few of them through Facebook though, which is kind of interesting. But as a kid it seemed weird. We were family, my dad seemed like he fit in, but I felt like an interloper.

As far as my mom's parents go, my parents were very close to her parents. We visited virtually every Sunday. Through the vagaries of age differences among married couples, my dad was only 12 years younger than his mother-in-law, who was only 18 when my mom was born. So he was almost as much in their generation as my mother's.

My grandfather was a steel worker, helped unionize the Bethlehem Steel Mill in Lackawanna, NY. He raised his family with 7 kids in a duplex in Lackawanna. I think (although I don't know if it was ever stated to me) that the family occupied the whole duplex, as neither unit is very large. They sold it to their daughter, my aunt, who sold it to her son, so it's still in the family.

When they moved out of Lackawanna they had a house built on 6 acres my grandfather bought from his brother. At that point, only my mom's two younger brothers were still living with them. It was farmland then, now suburbs. In 1960 he built a very nice, rather large, 3 bedroom ranch. It's about 2000 square feet. Oddly, it has only 3 bedrooms and 1.5 baths. It's laid out more or less like a conventional 3 BR starter home, but all the rooms are about 50% larger than you would expect. It's a lot of backstory, I know, but the point is that with all that square footage, they didn't use most of it, especially the main living areas.

There was a two car garage joined to the house by a breezeway that was also about the size of another two car garage. That, in essence, was their living room. They also remodeled their basement. That was their gathering space when all my aunts and uncles and cousins came over for Christmas and Easter. So my grandparents didn't need plastic on the carpets or the furniture... their main living room was sort of a museum that no one ever went into. When I was in high school they still had the original 20 year old carpet in the living room and it still looked brand new, as did all the furniture.
 
Top