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RTDNTOTO 🐻 Random Thoughts Deserving No Thread of Their Own 15 (2020)

Big Owl

Cyburbian
Messages
2,716
Points
32
My youngest daughter has her first cross country meet today, which is an away meet. Because of the pandemic, parents are only allowed to attend the home meets. Bummer for us but my daughter loves it because she would rather us not be there.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,024
Points
64
Eddie Bauer is not that big in New England so you don't see it around that much - more LL Bean, Patagonia, North Face and Mountain Hardware and REI is for southern New England types...
I go to Columbia factory outlet stores. We even have a Columbia employee store nearby that gives us goberment types a special pass.
 
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kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,480
Points
40
I go to Columbia factory outlet stores. We even have a Columbia employee store nearby that gives us goberment types a special pass.
I shop at Eddie Bauer outlets around here. I usually find some nice items.

Surprisingly, there aren't any Woolrich stores around here, and it's getting hard to find their women's clothing in stores. I've been to their factory outlet in Woolrich, PA, and found a few bargains.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
14,160
Points
58
Is it unethical to tell the AICP certification survey that I don't want to learn more about ethics?
It's likely not the best idea you've had recently.

I'd lean toward...yes...it's a bad idea.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,740
Points
49
I shop at Eddie Bauer outlets around here. I usually find some nice items.

Surprisingly, there aren't any Woolrich stores around here, and it's getting hard to find their women's clothing in stores. I've been to their factory outlet in Woolrich, PA, and found a few bargains.

IIRC, Woolrich Woolen Mills has been facing some significant financial troubles over the past few years. I believe they've laid of considerable staff and don't really produce much fabric in the U.S. anymore. They used to be a significantly supplier of fabric to a few garment manufacturers here in the U.S. but those manufacturers (Southwick/Brooks Brothers, Hertling, Filson, New England Shirt Company, Gitman, etc.) have fallen on hard times and now produce fewer clothes in the U.S. and/or have declared bankruptcy.

Brands like Woolrich and Pendleton had a mild resurgence about a decade ago when the workwear and Americana aesthetic was really booming. But as that look trickled down to more brands, fast fashion companies began looking overseas for cheaper manufacturing, which flooded the market hurting domestic producers and of course fashion changes (style, on the other hand is forever! :cool: ) so demand has fallen for the look and type of materials that brands like Woolrich supply. And American companies that would have used fabric from Woolrich in the past are probably less likely to now that they can source comparable fabrics from China or India or Portugal.

A friend of mine runs a custom clothing brand and most of her stuff is manufactured in the U.S. She moved the bulk of her cutting and sewing operations from NYC out to SoCal a few years ago because the costs were much less. She tries to source as much of her fabrics in the U.S. as possible but with the closure of Southwick and the winding down of operations from Woolrich, that has become increasingly difficult.

Those American manufacturers will probably keep producing socks and blankets here because those are cheap and easy to do with a lot of automation but the profit margins on those are considerably less than when get from selling a few hundred yards of "higher-end" fabric to a sewing house or when they do actual garment manufacturing for a pair of trousers, an overshirt, or a skirt or jacket in-house.

One saving grace for companies like Woolrich is that I have to imagine demand for more business professional clothing has fallen significantly during the pandemic and maybe the more casual workwear style (that works so well with fabrics from Woolrich) will make a resurgence in menswear. Another friend runs a high-end boutique. He doesn't sell his own stuff but carries a lot of Japanese, Italian, and American designers. He's quickly shifted away from tailored clothing and towards more casual stuff since the start of the spring. Dress shirts, $200 neckties, and $2,500 hopsack sportcoats and worsted wool suits used to make up a huge portion of his revenue. Now he can barely move them even at significant discounts yet he quickly sells out of sweatshirts and trousers with drawstrings that have equally stupid prices.
 
Messages
2,651
Points
22

WALKABILITY!!

Refreshing 10-mile walk to Downtown Nashville, University town, and State Capital!

Less than 2-mile walk to supermarkets, pharmacies, Costco, Lowe's, Walmart, The Shopping Center... all your needs!

Less than a half-mile walk to public bus transportation!

Sell your cars & convert the smiling spacious garage into a handicapped-accessible unit for Grandma.:heart:
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,480
Points
40
IIRC, Woolrich Woolen Mills has been facing some significant financial troubles over the past few years. I believe they've laid of considerable staff and don't really produce much fabric in the U.S. anymore. They used to be a significantly supplier of fabric to a few garment manufacturers here in the U.S. but those manufacturers (Southwick/Brooks Brothers, Hertling, Filson, New England Shirt Company, Gitman, etc.) have fallen on hard times and now produce fewer clothes in the U.S. and/or have declared bankruptcy.

Brands like Woolrich and Pendleton had a mild resurgence about a decade ago when the workwear and Americana aesthetic was really booming. But as that look trickled down to more brands, fast fashion companies began looking overseas for cheaper manufacturing, which flooded the market hurting domestic producers and of course fashion changes (style, on the other hand is forever! :cool: ) so demand has fallen for the look and type of materials that brands like Woolrich supply. And American companies that would have used fabric from Woolrich in the past are probably less likely to now that they can source comparable fabrics from China or India or Portugal.

A friend of mine runs a custom clothing brand and most of her stuff is manufactured in the U.S. She moved the bulk of her cutting and sewing operations from NYC out to SoCal a few years ago because the costs were much less. She tries to source as much of her fabrics in the U.S. as possible but with the closure of Southwick and the winding down of operations from Woolrich, that has become increasingly difficult.

Those American manufacturers will probably keep producing socks and blankets here because those are cheap and easy to do with a lot of automation but the profit margins on those are considerably less than when get from selling a few hundred yards of "higher-end" fabric to a sewing house or when they do actual garment manufacturing for a pair of trousers, an overshirt, or a skirt or jacket in-house.

One saving grace for companies like Woolrich is that I have to imagine demand for more business professional clothing has fallen significantly during the pandemic and maybe the more casual workwear style (that works so well with fabrics from Woolrich) will make a resurgence in menswear. Another friend runs a high-end boutique. He doesn't sell his own stuff but carries a lot of Japanese, Italian, and American designers. He's quickly shifted away from tailored clothing and towards more casual stuff since the start of the spring. Dress shirts, $200 neckties, and $2,500 hopsack sportcoats and worsted wool suits used to make up a huge portion of his revenue. Now he can barely move them even at significant discounts yet he quickly sells out of sweatshirts and trousers with drawstrings that have equally stupid prices.
I shopped at Woolrich's factory store in June. The mill is closed and they were selling the ends of fabric bolts. I got a nice piece of wool for a good price. I'm going to finish it into a blanket this winter.

Most of their clothes are made overseas. I've been wearing their clothes for decades. I find them now to be a little pricey for work and leisure.

And now I can't find my Woolrich coat that I wear for work. Its the end of an era.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,619
Points
40
This is pretty cool. A sculpture that's a plastic recycling collection point:

View attachment 49620


That is really freaking cool. But. The headline actually says "These ones". I think I died a little inside when I read that. :(
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,740
Points
49
I go to the grocery store once every 3 or 4 weeks. Every time I go, I get a pot roast or two. And every single time I forget to buy some horseradish sauce to go with them. :mad:
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
13,450
Points
55
Speaking of the grocery stores - I understand paper products are leaving the shelves in mass quantities. A couple local stores have put limits on purchases. People please, you don't need to hoard TP.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
16,046
Points
55
I remember when my hair did what I told it to. Those were the days. Where is Ursus when I need him...
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
706
Points
30
I try to do a 12 hour fast from dinner to breakfast so I end up eating breakfast when I get to work so today's toasted locally made scali with peanut butter on it is decidedly delish
I can't believe how much of my life I lived not knowing about scali bread. My wife's relatives from Lynn etc. would bring it down to the Cape for us when we lived there. We used to just stand around in the kitchen toasting and buttering slice after slice..
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
706
Points
30
Equal to fresh scali bread -

Portuguese bakery rolls from the Ironbound section of Newark
In the SF bay area - fresh sourdough bread
When I lived in Missoula, lunch break on Wednesdays coincided with fresh baguette day at Le Petit Outre- my wife and I would walk home together for lunch (ahh, walkable downtowns!) and eat one, buttered and still warm from the oven, before heading back to work to fight off carb-induced sleepiness.

I'm too far north in New England now for a good Portuguese bakery, but I sure miss those too. There's a place (more of a diner) in Provincetown right across from where you reserve whale watch tickets that does a egg, cheese, and linguica sandwich on a Portuguese sweet roll that will stick to your ribs and keep you warm throughout the three-hour boat ride!
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
16,046
Points
55
I can't believe how much of my life I lived not knowing about scali bread. My wife's relatives from Lynn etc. would bring it down to the Cape for us when we lived there. We used to just stand around in the kitchen toasting and buttering slice after slice..
Can I get scali bread without sesame seeds? Or is that sacrilege?
 

btrage

Cyburbian
Messages
6,431
Points
27
I use to be a big hat guy in my teens and early 20s. Wore baseball hats all the time. I'll still wear one from time to time, but when I do it just feels weird for some reason.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,100
Points
44
So last night as I was about to leave for my bicycle ride, I noticed one of our dogs had a plastic bag. I got it from her and it was from RAT POISON. At first I dismissed it, thinking the empty bag just blew into the yard, and I still think that's what happened, but I realized I didn't know that for sure. So I called the hotline on the bag and they said it's a slow-acting anti-coagulant. So if the dog did eat it, it wouldn't show symptoms for about 5 days. They said to induce vomiting with peroxide.... we decided to do it to all three dogs because we didn't know if the other two had any or not. The hotline said to get Vitamin K1 from the vet in the morning. So we call the vet and they said they don't do K1, have to go to the emergency vet. I call them, and they say they will charge $120 PER DOG to examine them before giving the prescription.

My son took them over and the vet just called: They called our vet and they said our vet could write the script which will save us a good chunk of money.

So now we're working through the details. All because (I think) a scrap of plastic blew into our yard.
 

dw914er

Cyburbian
Messages
1,492
Points
20
I use to be a big hat guy in my teens and early 20s. Wore baseball hats all the time. I'll still wear one from time to time, but when I do it just feels weird for some reason.

I wear a hat while I do yardwork so help avoid any suburns, but that's about it. My brother used to always wear hats, and then went bald, so when I was younger I thought that the hats caused it.

And hey, btrage!
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,100
Points
44
So last night as I was about to leave for my bicycle ride, I noticed one of our dogs had a plastic bag. I got it from her and it was from RAT POISON. At first I dismissed it, thinking the empty bag just blew into the yard, and I still think that's what happened, but I realized I didn't know that for sure. So I called the hotline on the bag and they said it's a slow-acting anti-coagulant. So if the dog did eat it, it wouldn't show symptoms for about 5 days. They said to induce vomiting with peroxide.... we decided to do it to all three dogs because we didn't know if the other two had any or not. The hotline said to get Vitamin K1 from the vet in the morning. So we call the vet and they said they don't do K1, have to go to the emergency vet. I call them, and they say they will charge $120 PER DOG to examine them before giving the prescription.

My son took them over and the vet just called: They called our vet and they said our vet could write the script which will save us a good chunk of money.

So now we're working through the details. All because (I think) a scrap of plastic blew into our yard.
Total bill: $66 for all three dogs. I'm happier.

Now I hope they do okay.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,677
Points
54
I'm sorry but in these exciting days of COVID I cannot in good conscience allow that sort of disregard for social distancing to occur via this forum. Please think of the rest of us. :mask:
dern

but seriously I had no idea that hugging was a thing for me in greeting because the few times I have socially distanced seen my friends, we greet each other with by saying "air hugs!" - so weird and necessary
When I lived in Missoula, lunch break on Wednesdays coincided with fresh baguette day at Le Petit Outre- my wife and I would walk home together for lunch (ahh, walkable downtowns!) and eat one, buttered and still warm from the oven, before heading back to work to fight off carb-induced sleepiness.

I'm too far north in New England now for a good Portuguese bakery, but I sure miss those too. There's a place (more of a diner) in Provincetown right across from where you reserve whale watch tickets that does a egg, cheese, and linguica sandwich on a Portuguese sweet roll that will stick to your ribs and keep you warm throughout the three-hour boat ride!
you can get Portugese rolls in Hannaford and if you are in Portland, I think you can get them in Trader Joes

Can I get scali bread without sesame seeds? Or is that sacrilege?
no, and don't ask that again


lol
I use to be a big hat guy in my teens and early 20s. Wore baseball hats all the time. I'll still wear one from time to time, but when I do it just feels weird for some reason.

I read this too literally and thought you meant "big hat" like Lincoln top hat big hat and thought, wow, that's different lolol

anyway, I wear baseball caps on bad hair days on the weekends - I have a woolen one from Syracuse University even - I do have an assortment of woolen and knit hats for winter and I am pretty good about wearing a hat when it gets cold
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,556
Points
42
I'm Scandihoovian and can get sun burned indoors. I wear a ball cap outdoors, pretty much always.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,571
Points
41
I'm Scandihoovian and can get sun burned indoors. I wear a ball cap outdoors, pretty much always.
Yeah, got to love the Viking genes. My legs are so pale white, they don't tan, they don't burn, nothing. My arms, my head, my neck, you could use a stop watch so see how fast I burn. Then, it's burn, peel, burn, peel, freckle. My tan is more like the freckles just kinda grow together.
 
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