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Software Rate e-government software

landon

Member
Messages
20
Points
2
Do any of you who work in the public sector have any experience using e-government software to incorporate their permitting process?

For those in the private sector -- does a government that you work with regularly have e-gov software that is customer friendly?

Our county is shopping for a solution that is web based that can track permitting but can also be accessed by the applicant to check on the status of their applications (the applicant will have a "read only" access of course).

Thanks for any advice.
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,377
Points
29
I worked for Greensboro NC and we hired Keane (i dont think they did a good job) to build a tracking program for us to the tune of just over 800,000 butt load of money but its a fantastic program. We could not find anything out of the box that would do what we as a local gov needed.

Good luck!
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,810
Points
61
I going to piggy-back my question along that same line -

Is there software that can help track permits and be tied to subdivision build out?

I had done that by hand :-c , haven't tried simple spreadsheet, want to make the jump.
 

monkeyflower

Cyburbian
Messages
58
Points
4
landon said:
Do any of you who work in the public sector have any experience using e-government software to incorporate their permitting process?

For those in the private sector -- does a government that you work with regularly have e-gov software that is customer friendly?

Our county is shopping for a solution that is web based that can track permitting but can also be accessed by the applicant to check on the status of their applications (the applicant will have a "read only" access of course).

Thanks for any advice.
As a codemonkey turned plannermonkey, I'd like to see more public entities have in-house programming expertise. Not only would it be good for those times when you decide you need x-random-piece-of-software, it would also help you know when consultants are ripping you off ($800k better do a *lot* more than just this...), help you maintain your systems once your overpaid consultants provide them, and help you realize when some activity could be done in a way that's much easier (cheaper) overall, despite requiring some technical expertise to implement. It makes me want to cry when I see how many opportunities local governments miss (or refuse to see) for want (or fear) of technical knowledge.

Plus, and purely as a bonus, it would make me in high demand.
 

landon

Member
Messages
20
Points
2
Seen a couple of market pitches

We have had a couple of reps. come in and show thier "out of the box" products. The names were accela, and cityview. Ever seen or used these products?

They seemed quite user friendly and adaptable to the particular needs of the government based on code requirements. And the cost was far less than 800K, both of these products were around 30-60K.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
We are looking at Masterview by Infomaster to provide a front end to our e-business software (Oracle and Geac mainly). The Council with the most advanced application of Masterview is Pittwater Council in Sydney. The Pittwater link will let you have a mosey around what they have done. Start at the "Development Application Register". You can guess a street address or application (DA) number to look at a real example.

The reference to a S.149 Certificate is a pre-purchase certificate that is mandatory in New South Wales - it describes planning controls.

Edit: Here is a link to Infomaster as well. They have a Masterplan product as well that is an inquiry tool for summarising planning controls. It is less an "e-gov" tool due to its specialisation.
 
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