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Real Estate Transfer Ordinance?

KGrotto

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
Do any jurisdictions have an ordinance wherein you can take certain actions or provide certain services upon the transfer of ownership of a parcel of land.
We are considering drafting an ordinance which would allow for certain opportunities for the city and/or landowner upon change of ownership. For example, there might be an opportunity to provide for sidewalk adjacent to a property, wherein the city, the buyer, and the seller share the cost of installation. There may also be provisions for non-conformities on the parcel, allowing the city to require compliance.
If you have such an ordinance, or considered one, or have thoughts on the matter, I would love to hear from you.
Many thanks!!
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
transfer ordinance

Our ordinance doesn't require the improvements or change you're suggesting. Rather, our ordinance requires that prior to the transfer of any multi-family or commercial property it recieve a "zoning certificate." This certificate lists the results of a light site plan review of the current site configuration. We note if the site is non-conforming on the certificate in terns of parking, setbacks, screening, surfacing, landscaping, etc... This way, the buyer has an explicit zoning assesment of the property and most potential or real zoning concerns are exposed.

This makes it easier to require the new owner to make improvements or changes to the non-conforming property when they propose improvements.

When they said they didn't know the property was non-conforming, we politly show them a copy of the zoning certificate they recieved at closing and ask...did you or your lawyer read this when you purchased the property?
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
31
My feeling is that such a scheme can only work in high demand areas. Grandfather will never die, unless the market is strong enough for us to demand improvements. If the market is soft with such a process, development will leap-frog over the problem areas. I want to do exactly what KG suggests, it's just that I know it won't happen without the correct market dynamics.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
Good thread, KGrotto.

Boiker's process is similar to what I'm used to seeing. I also agree with Mike (see, it goes both ways buddy!) that it only works in high demand areas.
 
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