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Regulation Reflected light

Maister

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Scenario: Neighbor complains to city hall their neighbors recently constructed metal roof is reflecting the suns rays when at a certain angle into their house and causing someone migraines.

Have you ever heard of a community regulating reflective surfaces (metal, water, glass)?
 
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luckless pedestrian

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whoa no - just on solar projects do we require no glare products but yeah metal roofs might be problem I hadn't thought of
 

mendelman

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Scenario: Neighbor complains to city hall their neighbors recently constructed metal roof is reflecting the suns rays when at a certain angle into their house and causing someone migraines.

Have you ever heard of a community regulating reflective surfaces (metal, water, glass)?
Nope and I really hope to never have to.
 

arcplans

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Scenario: Neighbor complains to city hall their neighbors recently constructed metal roof is reflecting the suns rays when at a certain angle into their house and causing someone migraines.

Have you ever heard of a community regulating reflective surfaces (metal, water, glass)?
Yes, it is an old CEQA question when you are reviewing a plan, but hey it is california we are talking about here.
 

bureaucrat#3

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We had a climate control facility locate at the base of an airport runway. The Planning Commission required a painted, non-reflective roof based on some specific standards recommended by the Airport Authority.

Otherwise, I've only received one complaint in 17 years for a reflective roof.
 

Gedunker

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A couple of Frank Gehry's museums have had reflective issues - one in LA and one in Spain, IIRC.
 

Faust_Motel

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Scenario: Neighbor complains to city hall their neighbors recently constructed metal roof is reflecting the suns rays when at a certain angle into their house and causing someone migraines.

Have you ever heard of a community regulating reflective surfaces (metal, water, glass)?
We vaguely do if houses are proposed in mapped viewshed areas (so it would be a condition of subdivision approval). It has never come up and I hope it never does.
 

Dan

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For buildings, I've seen light reflective value (LRV) maximums of 30% and 40% in zoning codes with fairly strict architectural regulations, mainly outside of the Northeast US. Some codes with LRV regulations have exceptions for window and door trim, or a certain percentage of the elevation area.

There's also some codes with performance standards prohibiting or limiting glare. Here's something I write for a for a UDC project that was put on the back burner. it's in the regs because solar panels and metal roofs are very popular around here.

A use must not create or reflect nuisance, discomfort, or disability levels of glare (Unified Glare Index rating of ≥20) to neighboring buildings, properties, or streets.

Welding, torch cutting, or similar processes must not visible past the lot line.
 
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