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Registering S E X Offenders

Should S E X offenders need to be registered?

  • Yes! Register them to save my children!

    Votes: 15 60.0%
  • No! They served their time, let them slither on in anonymity

    Votes: 6 24.0%
  • Can't you people let me get on with my life?!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other, I'll explain below.

    Votes: 4 16.0%

  • Total voters
    25

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
This story was in the paper today. I could have just titled this, "Why Wisconsin Is Going To Hell #13 " but it wouldn't be clear if I was siding with the residents or the rights of the released convict.

That does the Throbbing Brain of Cyburbia TM think about this issue? Please opine...
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
I think they should be registered and tracked and I think that the neighbors should be notified when one is moving into the neighborhood. The onlly way that those residents in that story found out was because someone leaked the info. I think that people have the right to know so that they can be cautious around their new neighbor and they can tell their kids to stay the hell away.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,984
Points
29
This is clearly a case where one individual with a steady hand and a clear conscious could save one or more children from a horrific experience, and the resulting lifetime of shame, by the proper application of 185 grains of lead traveling at twice the speed of sound. Yes, I am clearly advocating vigilante justice.

Government has clearly failed its citizens when a FOUR time offender is placed in a neighborhood full of innocent children - No matter what promises of monitoring are made by the authorities. If selected for the jury trial of the shooter of the child molester I would promote jury nullification to my peers and refuse to convict so the righteous shooter could escape double jeopardy.

One offense – I can see rehabilitation. Twice – prison for life. Anymore than that should mean death by whatever means are handy.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,853
Points
39
I think these people need to be registered and neighborhoods should be notified!

Here, you can look up sexual offenders (1 offense) or predators (multiple offenses) on a state website, by zip code. That's how I found out a sex offender had moved in just 2 doors down from me. I was glad we knew, so we could avoid the guy. Unfortunately, the website doesn't say if the crime was against kids or adults.

I think the state notifies neighbors if a predator moves into their neighborhood. The neighbors ran one out of Winter Park a few weeks ago by posting signs pointing at the guy's house and getting their story splashed all over the newspaper.
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
I think neighborhoods should be notified, but I also wonder why they don't put the offenders on some meds- like zoloft- that cause sexual dysfunctiona nd you aren't even interested in sex. A one time offender should be able to go into rehab, but they should have prison for life if it happens more than once.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
I like the sign approach. I would take it a step further and require that as part of their licensing that halfway houses should have to post a sign with a photo of the offender in the front yard stating that person is a sex offender.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
I'd like to have such information for protection, BUT exagerated mesures like the sign stuff will only make the offender more angry and more likely to do such things again.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,984
Points
29
SkeLeton said:
I'd like to have such information for protection, BUT exagerated mesures like the sign stuff will only make the offender more angry and more likely to do such things again.
You're advocating surrending the neighborhood to a sex offender if I understand you correctly. Maybe if we let him molest just one kid a year he will promise to leave the other children alone?

Kill him dead and move on.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Hmmm... I may not go as far as Guap's last post, but I did like some of what I heard earlier. Just once, an offender should be given the chance to reform, and should be given the opportunity to rejoin society. With a second offense, there should be no further attempt. Lock the person up in some concrete cell for the rest of their life.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,853
Points
39
My honest opinion (maybe this should be on the confessions thread) is that, with several members of my family having been victims of such crimes, there should be no mercy. Once, maybe there's the chance somebody made it up. Twice, fry 'em.
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
Now, for the other side of the coin...

In Washington, they have the offenders on the internet, and the information can be freely disseminated. Now, most states, including Washington, have something they call Indecent liberties . More or less, it's "nonconsensual touching of the sexual or other intimate parts of a person".

Okay, so there you are, had a few brews, and some woman (perhaps with breasts heaved forward in hopes of an oil change ;) ) gets a quick feel.

Yeah, you feel bad the next day, apologize, but instead you end up in cuffs... printed... photographed... and convicted. Hey, you did the crime, you do the time. But is that an offense that should follow you around forever?

I'm just playing Devil's Advocate here, I lean more towards shooting, frying, or altering people who deserve it... Still, it's something to think about.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,984
Points
29
Prepare for blunt talk on a serious subject.

Mastiff,
Agreed, there is a big spectrum there. However, placing one's Johnson inside a child is the other end of the spectrum. If you have the urge to do this and you succumb to these urges, even just once, then in my mind you have forfeited the right to exist freely in society. If you do it again, knowing the penalties and the harm you will cause another person you need to be put down for the benefit of society. My point is there are some people that need killing. Anyone have an argument against that reasoning? I promise no roid rage in my reply.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
It seems that I was misunderstood.... I guess I shouldn't post in a hurry :p

What I meant, is that for first time offenders there shouldn't be such a comotion, there should be information about the guy, and what he did. BUT since he only did it once, he should get a chance to amend to society and continue living a normal life... For repeated offenders... Castration, prision for life, death penalty... no mercy... they had their chance to amend, they blew it, good bye.
 

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
el Guapo said:
One offense – I can see rehabilitation. Twice – prison for life. Anymore than that should mean death by whatever means are handy.
I am in total agreement!

To answer the original question, yes they should be registered and tracked, if not immediately "put down" upon conviction.
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
.Off topic:


Mastiff said:

(perhaps with breasts heaved forward in hopes of an oil change ;) )
oh, now I'm not that cheap, I was at the oil change place and I only did it because $30 is waaay to much to pay for an oil change and no, I can change my own air filter, don't suggest the $15 filter you have when I've got 5 of them at my house

On topic:

I like a good hanging by the sensative areas until the coyotes get them.
 

OhioPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
304
Points
11
While I would personally want to know if my neighbor had been convicted of a sex crime, I personnaly don't think we should register sex offenders.

First, if they have served their time they have paid their debt to society. Should a mistake follow them for the rest of their lives?

Why not make all criminals be registered. If a burglar moves in next door, why shouldn't I know that? If we are going to have a system that requires one group to be registered why not all?

Again, I would want to know, but I think it violates a person's civil rights to be pointed out in this specific manner.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
I whole heartedly agree that they should be registered. if for nothing more so that the neighbors know to keep an eye on him.

You really are ruined with this registration. My old area where I worked as a fireman had a registered sex offender...the address was noted in our map books...no one was ever going to get him if the situation occurred.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
cowley.11 said:
Why not make all criminals be registered. If a burglar moves in next door, why shouldn't I know that? If we are going to have a system that requires one group to be registered why not all?

Again, I would want to know, but I think it violates a person's civil rights to be pointed out in this specific manner.
The thing with a sex offender, especially one that has molested children, is that often times they repeat. Also, the fact that they prey on children who lack the strength to escape or who are too trusting of adults, makes it very important for them to be registered and for the neighbors to be notified. If you have a burgular next door, chances are that he/she will not try and have sex with a child. The guy in the case mentioned at the beginning of the thread was convicted FOUR times. Maybe if they had notified neighbors after the first time, there would be three people who wouldn't have been sexually assaulted by this a-hole.


As for civil rights, when you are convicted of a felony, you lose (depending on which state you live in) many of your rights. You may not own or posses a firearm, you cannot vote, you cannot hold public office, you can't hold certain types of business or employment (teaching, etc) licenses.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
A follow up to yesterday's news story

The State may put another offender in the same house!

That building is doomed to be lost in an unexplained fire.
 
Messages
5,353
Points
31
A Cynic's Opinion

If me and my family have the power to lower property values just by our skin color, I wonder what a criminal/sexual offender would do to those property values?

Make all criminals, including shoplifters, domestic abusers, etc. register and put little signs on their lawns. You'd be surprised at how many of them reside in a nice little neighborhood.
 

prudence

Cyburbian
Messages
688
Points
20
Re: A follow up to yesterday's news story

Chet said:
The State may put another offender in the same house!

That building is doomed to be lost in an unexplained fire.
All of you planners bitch about communities providing efficient public services...well, doesn't this achieve that goal...now you only need to patrol one house.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Re: Re: A follow up to yesterday's news story

prudence said:
All of you planners bitch about communities providing efficient public services...well, doesn't this achieve that goal...now you only need to patrol one house.
I sold a house 6 blocks from there 2 years ago. They need to patrol more than one house anyway, trust me.
 

prudence

Cyburbian
Messages
688
Points
20
One step further...

Why stop with sex offenders...why not have all persons convicted of DWI register, and infor the neighbors. Sex offenders are a risk to a small segment of society, but drunk drivers affect all of our lives.

Convicted drunk drivers have proven their disregard for the welfare of society, especially those with multiple convictions. They cannot be trusted.

And remember that in Wisconsin drinking and driving is a hobby.
 
Messages
5,353
Points
31
Re: One step further...

prudence said:
Why stop with sex offenders...why not have all persons convicted of DWI register, and infor the neighbors.
That's exactly my point. Make ALL criminals register. Let the witch hunts begin.......
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,984
Points
29
Re: One step further...

prudence said:
Why stop with sex offenders...why not have all persons convicted of DWI register, and infor the neighbors. Sex offenders are a risk to a small segment of society, but drunk drivers affect all of our lives.

Convicted drunk drivers have proven their disregard for the welfare of society, especially those with multiple convictions. They cannot be trusted.

And remember that in Wisconsin drinking and driving is a hobby.
My Dad has massive injuries because of a DUI driver. He almost died and it put a huge burden on our family. Screw registering them, on the second offense kill them before they kill someone else. Can you feel the love?
 

Greenescapist

Cyburbian
Messages
1,169
Points
24
Re: One step further...

prudence said:
Why stop with sex offenders...why not have all persons convicted of DWI register, and infor the neighbors. Sex offenders are a risk to a small segment of society, but drunk drivers affect all of our lives.

Convicted drunk drivers have proven their disregard for the welfare of society, especially those with multiple convictions. They cannot be trusted.

And remember that in Wisconsin drinking and driving is a hobby.
Oh my, I didn't think I'd be saying this - but I agree with Prudence. Maybe Wisconsin will moderate me after all.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Re: Re: One step further...

EG said:
My Dad has massive injuries because of a DUI driver. He almost died and it put a huge burden on our family. Screw registering them, on the second offense kill them before they kill someone else. Can you feel the love?
I couldn't agree more. Once and I will give someone a chance. Twice and they no longer get any mercy.

A few years ago I happened upon a drunk weaving all over the road. As I was talking to the 911 operator to report the guy, he crossed the centerline and struck an oncoming car, injuring the driver and a passenger. That car missed me only because I hit the gas and went off the road. The drunk's words to me when he stumbled over were "Did I hit somebody?" He was charged with a felony and pled, or I would have been at the trial to testify. People like this do not belong on the road. If the only way to stop them is to put them in jail for the rest of their lives, then so be it. I would rather have that than some innocent person hurt or killed.

The same is true of other offenders. Molest somebody once and get at least twenty years. Do it again and get life. Serious crime deserves a serious response.
 

prudence

Cyburbian
Messages
688
Points
20
Hmmm...

Where are all the Dems and Liberals screaming about civil liberties and social programs???

Do you see how ridiculous that is?? I WANT ACCOUNTABILITY, NOT HUGS AND FEEL-GOOD RHETORIC.
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
Re: Prepare for blunt talk on a serious subject.

EG said:
Mastiff,
Agreed, there is a big spectrum there. However, placing one's Johnson inside a child is the other end of the spectrum. If you have the urge to do this and you succumb to these urges, even just once, then in my mind you have forfeited the right to exist freely in society. If you do it again, knowing the penalties and the harm you will cause another person you need to be put down for the benefit of society. My point is there are some people that need killing. Anyone have an argument against that reasoning? I promise no roid rage in my reply.
Nope. I just don't think one size fits all. Copping a feel from a grown woman doesn't equate to your example. That was my only point... If it were my child, the state wouldn't have to worry about a trial, except mine.
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
Habanero said:

oh, now I'm not that cheap, I was at the oil change place and I only did it because $30 is waaay to much to pay for an oil change and no, I can change my own air filter, don't suggest the $15 filter you have when I've got 5 of them at my house
;)

It was just hanging out there waiting to be used... I just had the first opportunity!
 

prudence

Cyburbian
Messages
688
Points
20
Re: Re: Re: One step further...

Michael Stumpf said:
Serious crime deserves a serious response.
Does that go for professional athletes who hit women? Or Presidents who lie to America under oath? Or famous people who steal fenoly amounts of merchandise? Are drug users in general?

What is a serious crime? Does society have an inkling of an idea??
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
Apparantly child molestors aren't treated too well by other prisoners, which is alright by me.

I don't trust the idea that pedophiles can be rehabilitated. It seems pretty easy for them to say "yup, I'm cured!" Even those who really believe they're cured might have a hard time once they're out in the world, probably with a lot of time on their hands and few friends.
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
Re: Re: Re: Re: One step further...

prudence said:
Does that go for professional athletes who hit women? Or Presidents who lie to America under oath? Or famous people who steal fenoly amounts of merchandise? Are drug users in general?
Yes. Yes. Yes. No.

Drug users take up way too much jail space. I have alternative theories on this that a staunch conservative like yourself would probably hate, but the penalty for illegally selling, or smuggling drugs would be life in prison without parole.

Users are generally not the problem, but become the problem when they are addicted and cannot afford the drugs. If you check, most "street drugs" are very cheap. It the supply and demand of black market goods that make it so costly.
 

Greenescapist

Cyburbian
Messages
1,169
Points
24
From the civil liberties angle, the thing that bothers me about sex offender registries is that they seem like another form of punishment. If someone served their mandated time and were set "free" they should be able to meld back into normal life. I understand that many sex offenders commit the same crimes again. Maybe this is where El Guapo's idea comes in - lock them up for life on the second offense. If our justice system is to even have a vague goal of rehabilitating someone, then they should be allowed at least one extra chance. And don't get me wrong, I hate child molesters. too.
 

prudence

Cyburbian
Messages
688
Points
20
There have been a lot of interesting viewpoints expressed...I guess my question is, "Where does it end?" Do the legislators truly express the opinions of society?

What about an 18 YO high school senior who gets his 14 YO high school frreshman girlfriend pregnant? What if the senior is female and the frosh is male? Are they sex offenders? Are they molesters?

And how many opportunities should any criminal get? When is it decided they truly cannot play a valuable role in our society and should be declared a "waste of fresh air." Remember, we all pay for thier mistakes...literally. Our tax $$ supports the prison system...
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Re: Re: Re: Re: One step further...

prudence said:
Does that go for professional athletes who hit women? Or Presidents who lie to America under oath? Or famous people who steal fenoly amounts of merchandise? Are drug users in general?

What is a serious crime? Does society have an inkling of an idea??
Yes. Who the person may be should not affect how they are treated under the law.

I can see the point of saying that the law should consider the degree of the offense (i.e., a feel as opposed to rape), but I thing there are some mechanisms in place for this already. As long as we are talking about changing penalties, we might as well recognize that the definitions of the crimes and there severity may also be altered.

Requiring registration/notification of sex offenders is an interesting proposition. The argument is that they may pose a physical threat (as opposed to merely a property risk) to others in the community, particularly children. Notifying neighbors is a means of warning them to be especially alert and to take precautions. Still, we do not require notication of others who may threaten personal safety, such as murderers. Is that a next step? I'm not so sure that is a bad thing.
 

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
Re: Re: Re: One step further...

So many issues here...

I guess all convicted criminals are "registered" in a way in that they now have criminal history.

There definitely is a difference between a convicted sex offender (felon in Texas) and a DWI offender (not prosecuted in Texas to the point of almost being decriminalized).

Sex offenders don't rehabilitate, they are sent to prison for punishment as an example for others. Once they get out they are immediately looking for their next victim.


Michael Stumpf said:
He was charged with a felony and pled, or I would have been at the trial to testify.
Ha Ha Ha Ha, sorry you've been had. It's not really funny though. A plea agreement is just a happy little get together between the defense shyster and the prosecutor (future defense shyster). In Texas it would have been pled out to time served (overnight stay in jail), small fine, community service, and a conviction on a lesser offense (ex. reckless driving). Of course other states might consider DWI a serious offense...

Agreed, drug possession should be handled through something besides prison. I believe the abuse of legal alcoholic beverages is far more dangerous to society as a whole than illegal drugs ever will be (except for some drugs like meth). How many users spent a night smoking grass and then had an overwhelming need to go wreck their car and burn some innocent person to death or to go home and beat the wife half to death? The same answer will not be applicable to a drunk...
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Right, where does it end?

[ot] slightly OT: This might be TMI for some but here goes.

For the third time in less than 10 years, I received a form letter from the State. I had previously been asked to be placed on the mailing list of people to be notified when a certain F*CK was up for parole so I could submit my testimony to keep this F*CK behind bars. Every time this happens, I submit my written testimony and the rest of my week is shot, because I had to re-live the horror of what this F*CK did to me, my family, my friends.

September 18, 1993. My wedding day. One of my best friends was a maid of honor. It was bad enough that she was in a car accident on her way to the rehearsal - rear ended (no racoons were killed in the making of this story) - The next day she was on pain meds and refused to wear her neck brace through the days events, so later she was poured into bed after a short reception courtesy of pain pills and khalua mud slides. We, the happy couple, were awoke at 4am by the news that she would not be at the gift opening because she was on her way home. Her twin brother, a gulf war vet and the best father to a step daughter I've ever seen, was leaving a bar in their home town of Kenosha, WI and was shot to death after walking into the middle of some one else's fight.

To this day, I fight to keep the F*CK behind bars (most recently a week ago). I also support the death penalty. Never used to. Frankly, I will pay taxes to the day I die to keep the F*CK behind bars and some ones bitch. Absent of that, fry the F*CK.

To be selfish for a moment - every anniversary has been "The day Mike died" and not the day Chet got married.

Thanks for letting me share.
[/ot]
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
I support the death penalty, I just wish they'd make it more painful. I think there should be a study done that compares crime levels now to crime levels after public executions by hanging, firing squad, or whatever they did to Mel Gibson in that Scottish movie.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Texas

How can TX be so lenient (sp?) on DWI when they fry crooks every chance they get? I'd think they'd be more aggressive?

Is it a "bad for business" thing?
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
Habanero said:
I support the death penalty, I just wish they'd make it more painful.
I say make them be one last benefit to society... Harvest their organs to donate to those in need.

While they're still alive...

...and awake...

...and without any pain meds.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
Violence will only create more violence... So death penalty should be the most painless and quickest posible...It's a good idea to use the organs for transplantation...although with permission from the family and the prissioner...
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
SkeLeton said:
Violence will only create more violence... So death penalty should be the most painless and quickest posible...It's a good idea to use the organs for transplantation...although with permission from the family and the prissioner...
I disagree. At times, violence is the only way to solve a problem. And why ask the family? Why not ask the family of the victim?
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,232
Points
25
I disagree. At times, violence is the only way to solve a problem. And why ask the family? Why not ask the family of the victim?
This society needs a justice system, not a revenge system.
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
jordanb said:
This society needs a justice system, not a revenge system.
We have a "justice" system in place now... How you think that's working out for us so far?
 

prudence

Cyburbian
Messages
688
Points
20
jordanb said:
This society needs a justice system, not a revenge system.
Oh, for Chr*st's sake...please start a Kumbaya thread and I'll call Susan Sarandon, Tim Robbins, Martin Sheen, Jeanne Garafalo, and the Dixie Chicks to support you...

Why do you give more rights to the criminal than the victim??
 
Last edited:

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
In the words of Billy Bragg (self avowed tree hugger)

"This is not a court of justice this is a court of law."

The law says they served their time and are rehabiliated, the real justice system (public opinion and attitudes) should not and probably never will say they are fit for polite society.
 

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
Re: Texas

Mike D. said:
How can TX be so lenient (sp?) on DWI when they fry crooks every chance they get? I'd think they'd be more aggressive?

Is it a "bad for business" thing?
It's an everyone does it thing. Legislators do it, voters do it, prosecutors do it, and jurors do it. So its easy to rationalize that it was just a little poor judgement and nothing to make a big fuss over :( Besides it's the arresting cops fault, why was this individual singled out to be arrested when there are so many other drunks on the road. Must be that the cop hates (fill in your favorite group).

Another reason is that most travel is by automobile (big trucks and big SUVs). Transportation choice is not available to keep drunks off the road so its another rationalization for limited prosecution.

Those shysters not fully employed in medical and product liability (lawsuit lotto) cases need to find emplyment somehow. Negotiating plea agreements for DWI offenders fills that bill.
 
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