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Form-based codes Regulating gas stations

luckless pedestrian

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How do you regulate/allow gas station in your form based codes or, performance zoning (where you are trying to be pedestrian friendly in a corridor?)
 

DVD

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They aren't allowed. Gas stations should be just outside downtown in our book.
 

ursus

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We don't use a form based code, strictly speaking, but in our really dense downtown and our mixed use zones around transit stations we don't allow them. We're not talking about a large area though, so it doesn't feel too draconian.
 

DVD

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I suppose you would have to push the building up to the build to line and have the gas canopy in back somewhere. The gas station might even need two entrances like a corner street entrance and one in back near the canopy.

Thinking bigger picture, what kind of transect is it? Our downtown transect just doesn't allow much that isn't high density and pedestrian/transit orient. Our transit transect follows a corridor and allows a little more, but drive-through and gas stations are still out. We don't have a transect outside of that - and ours it not a true form based code, but if this is a citywide code then there should be a transect that allows for regular gas station design and maybe another that can do what I talked about above.

On a side ramble, my problem with planners and form based codes is that we all look at it as a downtown thing and don't use it much for suburbs or other transects. It's T-6 or nothing baby!

Other side ramble - TT, how does Manhattan design gas stations? Do they even have gas stations or does everyone go out to Stanton Island for gas?
 

luckless pedestrian

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I am not doing a true form based code either, just applying a corridor-like transect to a corridor - I think the building has to be pushed to the side and the pumps the same and no pumps in the maximum setback area maybe?
 

Dan

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From the FBC I've been working on:

Building type:

Neighborhood service station
Principal building that has storefront frontage and vehicle fuel sales on the ground floor, and accommodates non-residential uses on upper floors.

Lot / building disposition (T-5 zone only):

Lot area
8,000 ft²-15,000 ft²​
Lot width (at minimum building setback)
80’-150’​

Neighborhood service station siting
Front setback
0’-10’​
Corner side setback
0’-15’​
Interior side setback
≥ 25’​
Rear setback
≥ 10’​
Alley setback
≥ 10’​
Frontage occupancy: front elevation
≥ 40%​

Accessory building siting (includes canopy)
Front setback
≥ 20’ behind principal facade​
Corner side setback
≥ 20’ behind principal facade​
Interior side setback
≥ 25’​
Rear setback
≥ 10’​
Alley setback
≥ 10’​
Distance from other buildings
≥ 10’​

Building height
Neighborhood service station
1.5 - 4 stories, ≥20’​
Accessory building
≤ 30’ (canopy: 14’-18’ to fascia bottom edge)​
Story height: 1st story
12’-20’​
Story height: upper stories
9’-12’​

Landscaping (applies to parking lots):

Sides of a parking lot (1) fronting on a street, or (2) next to a park or preserve area, must have landscaping and screening treatment with:

• ≥ 5’ wide manicured landscape strip, with turf grass or perennial groundcover;
• 2.5’ - 4.0’ (3’ maximum within 15’ of a vehicle entrance) brick, stone, or cast stone wall with a capstone;
• Average of (1) ≥ 1 tall shrub for every 5’ of frontage; (1) ≥ 1 ornamental tree for every 10’ of frontage; or a combination of the two, on street facing sides; and
• Foundation planting of short flowers, shrubs, or other decorative plants, on street facing sides.

Sides of a parking lot that (1) do not face a street, or (2) are not next to a building on the lot, must have a ≥ 5’ wide landscape strip, with turf grass or perennial groundcover.

(Applicable to commercial and mixed use building types) Sides of a parking lot must have a 6’ - 7’ tall (≤ 3’ high tall in clear sight areas, and areas ≤ 20’ from a sidewalk) masonry wall with a capstone, if it is next to one of these building / lot types.

• Detached house
• Small detached house
• Duplex
• Paired house
• Cottage court
• Multi-unit / collective house
• Townhouse

Landscape islands at the ends of a parking row
A row of parking spaces must have a terminal or endcap landscape island (≥ 9’ wide, and ≥ 160 ft²), with ≥ 1 tall tree for each row, at each end. ≥ 2 short trees may substitute for 1 tall tree if the terminal or endcap landscape island is next to a building on the lot.

Landscape islands between parking spaces
If a parking lot has ≥ 20 spaces, landscape islands having one of these forms must break up a row of parking spaces.

• An interior landscape island (≥ 9’ wide and, ≥ 160 ft²), with ≥ 1 tall tree for each row, at an interval of ≤ 10 spaces or ≤ 90’ in a row; or
• A linear landscape island (≥ 4.5’ wide), with an average of ≥ 1 tall tree every 30’, between parking rows.

A landscape island between parking spaces with solar carport or canopy coverage does not need a tree.

Parking:

(Parking surfacing and driveway/aisle/space disposition standards apply. There's no minimum parking space requirements.)

Off-street parking may be in rear or side yard areas, but not front or corner side yard areas.

A lot may have only 1 street loaded driveway on each street frontage. A curb cut must be ≥ 60’ from an intersection and other curb cuts.

Driveway and driveway approach width must be:

• One-way entrance or exit driveway: 12 - 14’ (16’ if part of a fire lane).
• Two-way entrance or exit driveway: 12’ - 20’ (20’ if part of a fire lane). A curb cut must be ≥ 60’ from an intersection and other curb cuts.

24587

Use:

Vehicle fueling
Establishment providing fuel sales to vehicles from a pump (gas station). This includes a co-branded retail or service use. (An electric vehicle charging station is not a fuel pump.)

Conditions:
• Neighborhood type: May be in a town center neighborhood, mixed use neighborhood, or mixed use village neighborhood.
• Number: A neighborhood unit may have ≤ 1 vehicle fueling use.
• Building type: Must be in a neighborhood service station.
• Accessory uses: A neighborhood service station must not have vehicle washing or vacuums.
• Location: Must front a through street.
• A vehicle fueling use must not play music, advertising, news, or regular announcements outdoors.



There's also architectural requirements, and utility area location and screening requirements. Lighting has to follow the local lighting code -- dark skies compliant, and flush with the canopy ceiling, Additional standards for the neighborhood service station type:

24584
 

luckless pedestrian

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Right - that's why I asked about a corridor leading to downtown - I like what @Dan did but if anyone else has anything, please share - thank you!!!
 
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