Lighting Residential exterior lighting standards

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#1
The City I work for has been receiving complaints regarding the intensity of exterior lights (e.g. porch lights, floodlights, front house lights). The City's former cheif officer has requested that we draft an ordinance to limit the intensity of lighting in residential, single-family, districts. Ironically, the Police Dept. is telling people that lighting deters crime.

Anyway, if you know of any community that has such an ordinance that regulates exterior lighting in residential districts please let me know.

Thanks for you help.
 
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#2
Search "dark sky" ordinances. It helps if the concept is included in your comp plan. The problem is enforcing this retroactively.
 

JMo

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#3
Athens, Georgia

Athens regulates - you can find the ordinance on Municode's website - ARTICLE I. ZONING - CHAPTER 9-19. OUTDOOR LIGHTING AND GLARE STANDARDS - Athens-Clarke County, Georgia - Code of Ordinances.

In my opinion - a successful lighting ordinance hinges on the enforcement aspects. Do you have officers who work after dark?
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
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#4
Search "dark sky" ordinances. It helps if the concept is included in your comp plan. The problem is enforcing this retroactively.
Definitely. The solution for the police department is not MORE lighting, it is BETTER lighting. Appropriate, well-designed lighting with reduced glare (full cut-off fixtures, more lighting fixtures at a reduced height versus fewer but taller fixtures, footcandle min/max limits) can deter crime and make it much easier for police officers and vigilent citizens to observe activity during the night. Badly designed lighting, regardless of brightness, can lead to uneven light distribution and shadows, and the glare can impair abilities to accurately observe activity during the night.

Retroactive enforcement is extremely difficult, especially on residential. You will need to have enforcement officers available to investigate at night to confirm complaints, particularly since it sounds like the PD won't be willing to help you out.
 

ColoGI

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#5
Definitely. The solution for the police department is not MORE lighting, it is BETTER lighting. Appropriate, well-designed lighting with reduced glare (full cut-off fixtures, more lighting fixtures at a reduced height versus fewer but taller fixtures, footcandle min/max limits) can deter crime and make it much easier for police officers and vigilent citizens to observe activity during the night. Badly designed lighting, regardless of brightness, can lead to uneven light distribution and shadows, and the glare can impair abilities to accurately observe activity during the night.

Retroactive enforcement is extremely difficult, especially on residential. You will need to have enforcement officers available to investigate at night to confirm complaints, particularly since it sounds like the PD won't be willing to help you out.
I used to be a member of the International Dark Sky Assn and I can tell you that you want to live in a city that treasures the night sky. Plenty of ordinances there to pick and choose from to stop this pernicious theft.

Second, lighting isn't hard to enforce. A past city had such an ordinance and the enforcement person didn't have a problem. And in winter, you can buzz by on the way home. Not a problem.
 

Hink

OH....IO
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#7
You really don't need more than 6.0 lumens. Anything over that is overkill. Unless you are in a safety area (by a backdoor, etc.) there is really nothing that should be over that number. I wouldn't imagine any place on earth would need to be higher than 10.0.

We have regulation based on these numbers.
 
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