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Admin / process Restrictions on number of permits per year for a use

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
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11,442
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39
In meeting with my director on my work on short term rentals, she really likes the idea of issuing a certain number per year -

My initial thought of trying to work through that concept is that perhaps it's a percentage of the overall housing stock to make it relate to something and not be arbitrary.

Even with that caveat I thought of, I still feel queasy about a first-come-first-serve up to x number as a reasonable way to control a use but I can't come up with a reason to support my wincing.

Any thoughts from the throbbing brain of Cyburbia?
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,751
Points
39
Can you set buffering requirements? Only 1 rental per 1500'?
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,751
Points
39
We set buffering on assisted living facilities of certain sizes in our community. Typically you have to register as a first come first serve kind of thing. We keep a map of all the registered houses. These houses must get their permits done within one year or they lose the registration. Once the permit is done the registration becomes permanent. When someone new comes in we check the map and if you don't meet the buffer, the answer is no. I would imagine this would get set up using a vacation home registration process. It's all first come first serve and too bad to the loser. Day one might be a nightmare, but after that it should level out. You could also grandfather known existing houses or provide a time period like 1 year to register and after that you're screwed to the buffer rule. The idea is to limit the amount of vacation rentals so they don't overwhelm a particular neighborhood like the beach/lake/giant Patriots statue or whatever cool stuff you got up there and it starts to limit the investors going crazy to get all the houses with a Tom Brady adjacent view.

The 1500 rule gives you about one home per quarter section - obviously change it as you need. We make some clarifications on measuring like arterial streets, canals, or other major things cut of the measurement with the idea it's now a new neighborhood and the buffer cuts off.
 

ursus

Cyburbian, raised by Cyburbians
Messages
5,032
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23
Require owner occupancy in all but the direct water-front district (or whatever the main attraction is). For us, that will thin the herd of "outsider" investment properties that create the most detrimental of the effects (damaging affordable housing efforts). It allows people to 'start out' and 'finish up', while in their homes by supplying additional income so it supports good housing goals to age in place, etc. and according at least the anecdotal evidence it helps keep the peace and quiet issues at bay.
 

af2087

Member
Messages
3
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0
I agree, it would make me queasy as well. Your businesses/LLCs who have several properties they use for this will be in line on Jan 1 every year, you can be sure. Other citizens who want to move in this direction will be the ones that end up being told "no" as the quota has been met. I'm a much bigger fan (and didn't start out this way, but have reached this point with time/experience) of simply establishing general requirements in your code for STRs that address the "complaint generators" like parking, noise, etc, and then focusing on what STRs don't comply. Using the renewal process is an easy way of having second looks and an opportunity to revoke their permit if there are issues. It's not a perfect solution, but it is far more realistic in terms of the staff and number of responsibilities most cities have.
 
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