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Run, Forrest, Run....

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So, in an effort to carve just a little time out of each day for myself, I've thrown myself headlong into distance running.

It started out two summers ago with my first 5k, where I startlingly enough learned that not just running, but racing is addictive. Now - I'm not really fast - I have often been passed by the elderly and disabled, but I've always come out in the top half of my division.

Took a bit of a hiatus to be pregnant with the twins, but jumped back in with 10ks this last spring. Just finished my first 15k on Sunday (I *just* stopped feeling like I need a hip replacement surgery this morning), and just signed up for my first half marathon (The Shamrock in March 07), and intend to do the Chicago Marathon in Oct. 07. I even dropped almost $200 on the nike+ipod so I can know EXACTLY how far I've been running at any given second.

Now, since I've started racing, it seems to me that I can't go to an event without tripping over another NY Capital Region planner - at one race this spring, 5 planners that I new happened to be doing a 5mi. trail run.

So - I know Mskis runs (and got me a kick ass running journal for my SS gift two years ago) - but anyone else on the bandwagon?
 

zman

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I go on beer runs and whiskey runs too.

Sometimes the run includes a stop for a bucket of chicken. ;)

Actually, I have never been really fond of running, although in High School I was forced to run 1.5 miles once, and felt really good afterward, which I think was the "runner's high". I have been too lazy to achieve that since.

I have thought about starting again. What do you recommend for a first timer?
 

imaplanner

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Back when my work was a 3 minute commute I used to run almost every day. Now that I work 9-10 hour days and have a 1 hour commute each way I have very little time to run. I generally try to run at least 1 mile one day each weekend - but I found that once you stop running regularly you very quickly start to really suck at it (i.e., no endurance).
 

donk

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With a lack of time for bike riding(hard to find 6-8 hours at a time) I am considering taking up running. I also have it in my mind that I have to do a marathon in my life, so I am thinking about working for next year's here ore maybe a vacation home for theirs.

As for planners and running each year at the CIP there is a fun run, that is pretty competitive.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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Way back when in HS I was on the cross country team.
Have not run since. :-$
 

natski

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I used to do a lot of running back at HS- was on the cross country team, made state etc etc, but i got bad knees and have been reluctant ever since to do a lot of running.

Since then i have run one 14km fun run (City to Surf in Sydney- awesome run!) but havent done anything since. I love running it is so addictive- i have started back at the gym and i get on the running machine thinking i will take it easy, but i cant help myself, go full pelt every time. I went for a walk the other day and wished i have run instead.

I guess i am a little nervous to go running with my bad knees- but i just have this need to run Downtown this thread has made me think i should just go for it and run again!
 

dandy_warhol

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i do a 5k every now and then but it is mostly to get the t-shirt. :r:

i've always wanted to be a runner. i like the idea of running. i admire people who love to run.

but i don't like running just to run. i'm horrible at it. i get winded after about 2 minutes.

but i love to run on the soccer field. give me a little black and white ball to chase after and i'm happy as a clam.
 

Jen

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cool! run downtown run.

I have to ask, what exactly do you find addicting about running/racing?
 
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I have been running the 2.5 miles to and from work almost every single day since the begining of August, which has been great, for a number of reasons.

1) I have lost about 12 pounds. When I went for a stretch of not drinking for about two weeks I ended up being down about 23 pounds from my starting weight. Once I started drinking again I got lazy and then ended up getting sick, so that combination of beer and not running made me put on some more pounds. I am tentatively planning to not drink between January 1 and the Super Bowl, just to see how much I can lose.

2) I have saved almost $200 that I would have paid to ride the Metro one stop each way. I do end up driving my car a little more because every night I go to my office to drop off the clothes I am going to wear the next day. But based on the miles and my car's average miles per gallon, I still net a total of about $160 on transportation costs.

3) I spend about as much time running each was as I would if I were taking the Metro, so my total transportation time per day is about the same. What is really nice is that since I no longer feel like I need to work out when I get home from work, I have a lot more free time.

I would definitly advise anyone for whom it is feasible to run to work to do so.
 

dandy_warhol

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I have been running the 2.5 miles to and from work almost every single day since the begining of August, which has been great, for a number of reasons.

1) I have lost about 12 pounds. When I went for a stretch of not drinking for about two weeks I ended up being down about 23 pounds from my starting weight. Once I started drinking again I got lazy and then ended up getting sick, so that combination of beer and not running made me put on some more pounds. I am tentatively planning to not drink between January 1 and the Super Bowl, just to see how much I can lose.

2) I have saved almost $200 that I would have paid to ride the Metro one stop each way. I do end up driving my car a little more because every night I go to my office to drop off the clothes I am going to wear the next day. But based on the miles and my car's average miles per gallon, I still net a total of about $160 on transportation costs.

3) I spend about as much time running each was as I would if I were taking the Metro, so my total transportation time per day is about the same. What is really nice is that since I no longer feel like I need to work out when I get home from work, I have a lot more free time.

I would definitly advise anyone for whom it is feasible to run to work to do so.

can i ask a slightly personal question: do you shower when you get to work?
 

dandy_warhol

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Yea, there is a weight room and showers at my office.
oooh. sweet. we don't have anything like that.

*shakes fist at guvm't*

i live about a mile from work and try to walk to work a couple times a week.

on the humid days i'm perspiring by the time i get to work.
 

Jaxspra

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I like to run, I don't do it quite enough on "real" ground bu I do enjoy it. The only "race" I have ever been in was a Frost Bite Series at Forest Park in STL. It was a series of runs (starting with 3k up to a 5k), it was in the middle of January at around 8 in the morn!! guhgughgu it was cold!
I run on the machines in the gym mostly but in the spring I try to get out on real ground about once a week. I can barely run an entire mile without stopping though :-$ (I do continue to run, its just often a mix of fast walking and running, I simply don't have the endurance)
It is addicting, its the feeling I have after pushing myself that hard (numbness, etc) that is so addicting. My best friend runs the Chicago Marathon every year. The training that leads up to it and the way she feels for about 3 days afterwards, I am not sure its worth it!! Three weeks before the marathon she runs 20 miles on a Saturday morning and thats just the end of training. But I am proud of her and try to get there each year to watch her run it, its VERY inspiring!
 

Greenescapist

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I like running, but sometimes I have a hard time staying motivated. I've run for years, since high school, but have not done a 10K race in a bit. I recently joined a gym to try to mix up my exercise routine a bit- add some lifting, spinning, yoga, etc- and that's helping. Hopefully, by the time spring rolls around, I'll be ready to run outside again. Now the nights are cold and dark.
 

dandy_warhol

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Now the nights are cold and dark.
this cold dark weather is doing nothing for my motivation to make it to the gym. when i get home from work i don't want to have to venture back out into the cold.

but, i have joined a raquetball league and an indoor soccer league to motivate me somewhat.
 
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I have thought about starting again. What do you recommend for a first timer?
Its all about the intervals. 5 min walking warmup, )1 min. jogging, 1 min recovery walk, ) x5, 5 min. walking cool down. Once you don't feel like you're going to die doing that - increase your running intervals.

cool! run downtown run.

I have to ask, what exactly do you find addicting about running/racing?
I think its a couple things. I always feel SO good after a run - physically and emotionally. Well, maybe not physically after a race where I've really pushed myself, but training runs - definitely. And after a race - I feel like I've challenged myself, in a way that I don't get to in the rest of my everyday life.

I think its also about appreciating my physical body in a way that's been really difficult post-partum with the twins. I'm done having kids, being pregnant, nursing, I was feeling like "ok - this is MY body for the rest of my life - what am I going to do with it, aside from be annoyed at how my kids have aesthetically ruined it?" and instead of focusing on the maddening skin pouch below my navel, I pay attention to my improving race times, and how good my lungs and legs feel. And strong and kick ass running makes me feel.

I think the other thing - running is exclusively MINE. It so selfish - I don't do it for my kids, or husband, or job, or to be a good friend or daughter. The only reason I do it is for me - I'm completely me in my own head for 30 minutes, thinking about what I need to do on that run. And that never ever happens to me otherwise, since the twins have been born. Its almost zen.
 

Jeff

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Once you run 26.2 you'll never be the same. Welcome to the dark side.
 

cololi

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Not much of a runner, very seldom do I do anything other than 15-10 minutes on the treadmill or around the neighborhood.

However, I am in training to do the wasatch powder keg race this year: roughly 6 miles, 6,000 vertical feet of climbing, 6,000 vert of skiing. Starting at an elevation of 8200 feet and going up and down several mountains, max out at 10,500 with the longest continuous hike of roughly 1800 vertical.
 

Bear Up North

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Back In The Day

You wouldn't know it to look at this lumbering bear now, but I was a distance runner for a number of years.

Jump in the "wayback machine" back to the early 1980's. I broke my arm, playing basketball. My twice-a-week basketball games were over, for awhile, so I thought I would try running. I started by just running around a city block. (I lived in north central Toledo.....traditional grid pattern streets.)

Each day I would try to run just a little farther. That technique worked for me, because within six months I was running in 10K races, 5K races, etc. I became so addicted to running that I would get pixxed-off if I didn't run. For about a five-year period I was running 6 to 9 miles, usually 5 days a week.

Because I am a stats geek, I tracked every mile on my predecessor to Excel.....yellow legal pads. :-$ I even gave "names" to the different routes I would run, often kicking-in local attraction names, etc. For instance, when I would run a certain route that included jogging past Westgate Shopping Center, that was my "Westgate Route". What a geek.

Eventually I tired of city streets and sidewalks and started to drive over to our area's great metro-parks. Often I would make the drive to Oak Openings (a huge metro-park near Toledo's airport) and run the different color-posts-identified trails. I would be so calm after running, I would cruise around the southwestern part of Lucas County and the northeastern part of Henry County. These "calm" cruises eventually led me on a path to move to the boonies. :)

Disaster struck, though. In the later 1980's I pulled a hamstring. That injury kept me off the trails for a while and when I returned I changed.....because of the discomfort of the torn hammy.....the way I ran. Eventually, running became a chore instead of an excitement.

During that running period of my life I dropped a ton of weight.....going from around 240 to about 205.

Now the disclaimer: I was the world's slowest runner. Well, not quite the slowest, but still pretty dang slow. I loved the distance and kept a steady (but slower) pace. In 10K runs I would finish in the second group of runners.

Yes, I did get a "runner's high". When I ran as often as I did I would start slow and after a bit something would kick in.....suddenly my pace would quicken, my smile would widen, my muscles would stop aching.

I miss those days.

Oh well. Back to my Twinkie.

Bear
 

Trail Nazi

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Unless my life depends on it, nope, I am not a runner. It is too hard on my joints. I do love running in the water as a part of water aerobics.
 

Jeff

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Some of the fastest guys I know are over 50.

One of them is a 2:30 marathoner, and another runs 15:00 5Ks in XC.

Running is one of those sports, I truly believe, you get better as you get older.
 

Jen

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baggy sweats or singlets?

Its all about the intervals. 5 min walking warmup, )1 min. jogging, 1 min recovery walk, ) x5, 5 min. walking cool down. Once you don't feel like you're going to die doing that - increase your running intervals.



I think its a couple things. I always feel SO good after a run - physically and emotionally. Well, maybe not physically after a race where I've really pushed myself, but training runs - definitely. And after a race - I feel like I've challenged myself, in a way that I don't get to in the rest of my everyday life.

I think its also about appreciating my physical body in a way that's been really difficult post-partum with the twins. I'm done having kids, being pregnant, nursing, I was feeling like "ok - this is MY body for the rest of my life - what am I going to do with it, aside from be annoyed at how my kids have aesthetically ruined it?" and instead of focusing on the maddening skin pouch below my navel, I pay attention to my improving race times, and how good my lungs and legs feel. And strong and kick ass running makes me feel.

I think the other thing - running is exclusively MINE. It so selfish - I don't do it for my kids, or husband, or job, or to be a good friend or daughter. The only reason I do it is for me - I'm completely me in my own head for 30 minutes, thinking about what I need to do on that run. And that never ever happens to me otherwise, since the twins have been born. Its almost zen.
Sounds like a great place to be, on a run. The interval method for getting started sounds doable for any novice, walk run, walk, run.
 

Jeff

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Here's what I always tell the peeps who come to me with the "I want to start running" questions...

1. Hardest part is getting out the door. Get off the couch, go outside, the rest will fall into place.

2. In the beginning, your goal should be to run, continuously, for 30 minutes. Dont worry about speed, pay no attention to "how far" you ran. Its all about time.

3. Start with 3 10:00 run/walk intervals to get you to your 30 minute goal. 9:00 walking, 1:00 running. 4 days a week. then next week 8:00, 2:00, etc. Adjust as necessary if too easy or too hard.

4. Come see me when you can run continuously for 30 minutes, and we'll go from there.

...nobody ever comes back :-(

The hardest part in starting a running program is the first 3 months. This is where you will decide to stick out the pain, suffering, and misery or give it up.

it does get easier after ~3 months!! The workouts may get HARDER, and they will, but your body is adept at teh training load you are putting on it.

Give me 3 months, I'll give you the world!!

Luncthime....out for an easy 6.
 

zman

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I go on beer runs and whiskey runs too.

Sometimes the run includes a stop for a bucket of chicken. ;)

Actually, I have never been really fond of running, although in High School I was forced to run 1.5 miles once, and felt really good afterward, which I think was the "runner's high". I have been too lazy to achieve that since.

I have thought about starting again. What do you recommend for a first timer?

What a Difference a Year Makes...

I knew there was a running thread somewhere here, but it took a good bit of searching to find it. Now that I have....
As I have alluded in a couple other threads, that because of a work-sponsored weight-loss competition I have lost 14 pounds, 4 inches, and I have become the fittest that I have ever been in my life. During this program I took to running on the treadmill as a warm-up. A quick 1/2 mile turned into 1 mile which turned into 1 1/2 which turned into 2 miles. Now I have been using running as a great form of exercise and have begun to entertain the thought of running a 5k (probably a winter one, as we Coloradoans are crazy). This past weekend was my first run off of the treadmills, a 2 miler with the dog (she has much to learn herself) and it was good. I did walk a bit (due to side stitches and dog behavioral issues), but other than that I had a great workout in the morning without purchasing a lot of equipment or driving the 6 miles to the gym.

The biggest issue facing me right now is side stitches. I was getting bad ones at first, then they went away, and then they are back-- which is now holding me back. I focus on my breathing (remember, I have less o2 up here than most Americans) and I try to focus on other things too. That doesn't seem to work. The only thing that works is stopping and walking for a short bit and then starting again (particularly when the pain moves to my right shoulder). What have some of the runners here done about this?

I also want to welcome myself to the Cyburbia Runner's Club. :-D
 

Hink

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Wow, I don't know how I missed this thread last year...

Running is kind of my thing. I am probably one of the few planners who ran in college too (meaning for the university). I have found that not many architects or planner type people ran in college.... not sure why.

I enjoy my mileage- 60-90 a week. Marathons are a different story though. 5k's and 10k's are fun and enjoyable... but marathons are bad.... ugh.
 

craines

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I use to love to run now I just do the stairmaster and pretend I am moving through a pristine enviorment. I then go home to a pretend meal and sit down to a no calorie age reducing, image improving, iq increasing meal of the finest whiskeys and all the while being served by all the women I have ever met cause they all want me, that is after they get to "really" know me..of course.

Somedays I reall enjoy my disconnect!!!!
 

Chet

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In my early 20's I ran about 5-8 miles a day. I even trained fo a marathon, and hit around 18 miles before I blew out a knee. I can't even do stairs now, [haven't had sergury]
 

natski

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Im currently training for my first triathlon (which is next week eek!) so i have been doing a bit of running too- i love the feel of being by yourself, some lovely scenery and the feeling of being totally buggered at the run of the run- the best feeling i reckon!!!

The biggest issue facing me right now is side stitches. I was getting bad ones at first, then they went away, and then they are back-- which is now holding me back. I focus on my breathing (remember, I have less o2 up here than most Americans) and I try to focus on other things too. That doesn't seem to work. The only thing that works is stopping and walking for a short bit and then starting again (particularly when the pain moves to my right shoulder). What have some of the runners here done about this?
I have always thought that if you get into a good pattern with your breathing, not over concerntrate, but be aware of it is what helps stitches- and if you ever get one you dont stop, you run them out- but i dont know how scientific/true that is...
 

nrschmid

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would love to do a marathon one day but my shoes feel like they loose their suspension after mile 5 or so, and all I feel is the pavement at that point. Any ideas?
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
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I used to love running and ran cross-country. Lots of untreated knee ligament injuries have sidelined that hobby because my knee tends to dislocate while I'm running. However, I really enjoy cycling and swimming (lower-impact so knee will tolerate it), so the idea of a triathalon has a lot of appeal. I've been thinking about going to a doctor to see about a good quality knee brace to prevent dislocation while I'm running and potentially surgery to see about repairing the damage present.
 

alex1

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I've been running ever since high school. However since I've been in uni I've stepped up my running to 15-20k 2 times a week. In terms of relieving stress, its great. Definately worth it after completing a big studio assignment. Some people say its hard to motivate yourself for running long distances, but my solution is using the Ipod nike+ counter. The stats and challenges are a definate motivator. If any of you guys have nike+ feel free to add me at alix_03@hotmail.com.
 

Michele Zone

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The biggest issue facing me right now is side stitches. I was getting bad ones at first, then they went away, and then they are back-- which is now holding me back. I focus on my breathing (remember, I have less o2 up here than most Americans) and I try to focus on other things too. That doesn't seem to work. The only thing that works is stopping and walking for a short bit and then starting again (particularly when the pain moves to my right shoulder). What have some of the runners here done about this?
I don't run. Running has always been a problem for me because of my respiratory problems. But I used to walk up to 6 miles in the Mojave Desert (not that many months before I ended up bedridden). If you don't get any suggestions from anyone else, I will suggest you try taking milk thistle as a supplement and see if that does anything for it. (It's kind of an educated guess, not something I did specifically for this issue. So if you try it, I would be interested in hearing if it actually helps.)

And congratulations on your healthier lifestyle. :)
 

Hink

OH....IO
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What a Difference a Year Makes...

I knew there was a running thread somewhere here, but it took a good bit of searching to find it. Now that I have....
As I have alluded in a couple other threads, that because of a work-sponsored weight-loss competition I have lost 14 pounds, 4 inches, and I have become the fittest that I have ever been in my life. During this program I took to running on the treadmill as a warm-up. A quick 1/2 mile turned into 1 mile which turned into 1 1/2 which turned into 2 miles. Now I have been using running as a great form of exercise and have begun to entertain the thought of running a 5k (probably a winter one, as we Coloradoans are crazy). This past weekend was my first run off of the treadmills, a 2 miler with the dog (she has much to learn herself) and it was good. I did walk a bit (due to side stitches and dog behavioral issues), but other than that I had a great workout in the morning without purchasing a lot of equipment or driving the 6 miles to the gym.

The biggest issue facing me right now is side stitches. I was getting bad ones at first, then they went away, and then they are back-- which is now holding me back. I focus on my breathing (remember, I have less o2 up here than most Americans) and I try to focus on other things too. That doesn't seem to work. The only thing that works is stopping and walking for a short bit and then starting again (particularly when the pain moves to my right shoulder). What have some of the runners here done about this?

I also want to welcome myself to the Cyburbia Runner's Club. :-D

I would suggest pickle juice. I know it is odd, and some would say it is an old wives tale, but I think it works. Just try like two tablespoons fifteen minutes before you go on your run. It doesn't work on everyone, but it has worked on many. It is worth a try, even if you hate pickles.

If that doesn't work, be sure to stretch your arms before you run. Many times it is the tightness in your shoulders or triceps that can lead to the tightening of muscles. Just some things to try. Good Luck!!
 

dandy_warhol

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I've been getting more into running. I even dragged myself out to do 2.5 miles yesterday. Up until a year ago I had not been able to consistently able to run a mile without hitting a mental wall. But I did a 5k in December and just did another one in May. At the May one I had an injured knee but still tied my PR for 5ks. (I like to imagine what I could've done if I hadn't been injured.)

Last night I took out my new little mp3 player to try to enjoy some tunes and spent most of my running adjusting the ear buds. Annoying!

Can anyone recommend ear buds/headphones to wear while running?
 

Hink

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Can anyone recommend ear buds/headphones to wear while running?
If you are running outside, I would strongly recommend against wearing earphones of any kind. No only do you open yourself up to being a victim, you can't hear cars, bikes, etc.

If you are running on a treadmill I would go with earbuds, but not if you run outside. It isn't worth the risk. I have been hit by two cars running (I run a lot though) and I don't wear anything.

Enjoy the weather, breeze, and air. Sorry to be a buzzkill.... :-$
 

imaplanner

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I'm going to assume Dandy likes to live dangerously Hink_Planner. And realistically alot of it depends on where exactly you are running.

The ones I use and really like are Sennheiser mm50's.

The nice thing about Sennhieser earbuds is they are made to have the cord wrap around the back of your head instead of your front, so they are more comfortable and don't get in your way when running.

They cancel out the noice really well also- so don't tell Hink_Planner ;)
 

beach_bum

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If you are running outside, I would strongly recommend against wearing earphones of any kind. No only do you open yourself up to being a victim, you can't hear cars, bikes, etc.

If you are running on a treadmill I would go with earbuds, but not if you run outside. It isn't worth the risk. I have been hit by two cars running (I run a lot though) and I don't wear anything.

Enjoy the weather, breeze, and air. Sorry to be a buzzkill.... :-$
Yes and you cannot hear a predator if they are coming at you from behind! I used to run with an Ipod, but now I run with clip-on mace spray :) I got a bright yellow one so people who might think to try something are fully aware of what I'm packing :p

If you are running inside, go look at the Nike brand ear buds, they have some with a wrap that keeps them on your ears.
 

Rygor

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I used to be a runner after having run track in high school, then tons of running in the Army, then did it on my own through college and a few years after doing countless 5k's and 10k's. Having flat feet, though, I always had tons of foot problems, plus my knees/shins always hurt. I stopped and now I lift weights heavy twice a week instead. Believe it or not my joints feel much better now and I look and feel way better than I ever did as a runner. Not saying that anybody shouldn't run if they want to.

Here are a few articles for the ladies out there on why weight training is way better for weight loss, however, if that is your goal:

http://articles.elitefts.com/articles/training-articles/strongher-university-the-female-psyche/
http://www.70sbig.com/blog/2011/04/confessions/
http://www.70sbig.com/blog/2011/04/70s-big-females/
http://www.stumptuous.com/lies-in-the-gym
http://primitivestimulus.com/2011/04/women-and-muscle/
http://graemethomasonline.com/ladies-cardio-sucks-for-weight-loss/

BTW, exercise science and nutrition science is one of my things I'm passionate about, in case you couldn't tell, and I could talk more about it intelligently than I probably even could about planning topics. I personal train on the side and have been a weightlifting coach for a collegiate team for the past 6 years.
 

dandy_warhol

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If you are running outside, I would strongly recommend against wearing earphones of any kind. ...Sorry to be a buzzkill.... :-$
Total buzzkill. :not::p But a good point.

I'm going to assume Dandy likes to live dangerously Hink_Planner. And realistically alot of it depends on where exactly you are running.
Danger is my middle name! Thanks for the suggestions. I do listen to my music quite low when running to be sure I can hear traffic plus I'm a look both ways, two or three times, kind of person.

Rygor, I'm a firm believer in cross-training. Right now my routine is a combination of pilates, yoga, soccer, and running, with some zumba thrown in. I do still have my gym membership but haven't been in a few months. It is difficult to be inside when it is so nice outside! I too like exercise science and nutrition and have thought about becoming a personal trainer, after I open my bakery and become a pilates instructor. :p
 

Rygor

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Dandy, absolutely cross training is a good thing. I do strongman stuff on the weekends for conditioning and overall strength work plus some interval training like sprinting and hill running. Also do some indoor rock climbing a couple times a month and have recently started learning yoga. All great stuff. Gotta hit all those energy systems!
 

SW MI Planner

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Happy to report that I survived my first triathlon training today - 30 minutes of laps, 30 minutes on the bike, and 20 minutes of running (which, I am fully ok with admitting I had to walk a few times). Next week we are in the lake. The cold, leechy, lake.
 

dandy_warhol

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Happy to report that I survived my first triathlon training today - 30 minutes of laps, 30 minutes on the bike, and 20 minutes of running (which, I am fully ok with admitting I had to walk a few times). Next week we are in the lake. The cold, leechy, lake.
Congrats on completing day one! That's more that a lot of people can say!
 

ofos

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Hate the 5K

Back a number years ago, I was pretty serious runner. Had run cross-country in HS and then reacquired the running bug in my 30's. I'd run nearly every day and raced most weekends throughout the year doing everything from 5K through marathons. In all that time, I don't remember ever enjoying the 5K. At other distances, there was the opportunity to reach a pace that balanced oxygen debt with speed until it was time for a finishing sprint. Not so with the 5K. For me, just about the time that I'd start to hit that comfort zone, the race was ending and the sprint would start.

It was just 5K of pain. Anyone else have a better experience at that distance?
 

Hink

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So I have been running competitively since 7th grade. Junior High, High School, College, Road racing. I have accomplished lots of goals 5k under 15, 10k under 31, marathon under 3 hours.

I don't think I have enough years left, time, or talent to get under 4 for the mile though. It is amazing when you think about it. 60 seconds per lap, 4 times. I have met two people who have ever gone under 4 minutes. When Sir Roger Bannister did it in 1954 no one ever had. Now 56 years later 250 Americans have gone under 4 minutes. With well over 1000 men beating it in the world. Steve Scott has run under 4 minutes 136 times.

4:00:0. What an amazing number. ;) :D
 

wahday

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Back a number years ago, I was pretty serious runner. Had run cross-country in HS and then reacquired the running bug in my 30's. I'd run nearly every day and raced most weekends throughout the year doing everything from 5K through marathons. In all that time, I don't remember ever enjoying the 5K. At other distances, there was the opportunity to reach a pace that balanced oxygen debt with speed until it was time for a finishing sprint. Not so with the 5K. For me, just about the time that I'd start to hit that comfort zone, the race was ending and the sprint would start.

It was just 5K of pain. Anyone else have a better experience at that distance?
With my new job, I have less and less time for more extended runs which I had been doing the last two years. Usually I would run 5 miles three times a week (with the ocassional 8 miler every few weeks). On a good week, I would also get 20-30 mile bike ride in. But lately, I am lucky to exercise 3 times a week (some combo of the above). And the time I have is less, so I have been running 5ks (3 miles) about twice a week and then a bike ride on a weekend day. Sometimes I don't get to the ride and do a run instead. But the thing that has changed is that my bike rides have become longer. A few weekends ago I went for a great ride way out of the city by some extinct volcanoes. A good 40 plus mile ride with over 1000 ft. of elevation. Great fun.

At first I did find the 5k to be a little too short, but I have quickened my pace now and run it pretty hard, so I hit the stride a little earlier and feel well worn by the end. I also changed my running style about a year ago. I now do more of a barefoot style with the strike somewhere between the ball of my foot and a mid-sole strike. It really changed my running and especially my speed - I can go faster and feel less tired as it engages more muscle groups. And its great for lower stomach muscles...
 

dandy_warhol

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I signed up for the Rock 'n' Roll Mardi Gras Half-Marathon in NOLA for March 2012. I want something positive to look forward to in March and figured running would be a good focus for me. I'm on day 4 of training and yesterday I ran 1.5 miles. Go me. 15 weeks and 4 days until I need to be able to run 13.1. My only goal is to finish.

I managed to talk the Hubby and my sister into running the half-marathon relay - that way I'll have company on my run. I hope. Neither of them are runners but they are doing it to support me. I think.

I realize it is a bit cliche but we'll be wearing shirts in honor of Sylvie.

As part of my training I'll be doing a 5k in December, a 5k in January, and a 10k in February. Finding a 5k and 10k in the winter in the north east will be a challenge.
 
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