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?'s re: joint degrees (Public Policy / Urban Planning)

2020planner

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17
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I am planning on going to grad school in the fall of 2005. Though I was originally leaning towards Public Policy (I studied history in undergrad and was always thinking of going to law school), my curiosity has been piqued by Urban Planning.

Is it possible to weave these two disciplines together? Ultimately, I would like to live overseas and combine these two foci, possibly providing a platform to help others build in eco / community-friendly ways.

Any advice is greatly appreciated!
 
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Cardinal

Cyburbian
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Sure it is possible. I have an undergrad degree in public administration and a grad in geography (planning/economic development focus). Many smaller communities require you to fill more than the role of planner. The more diverse your background, the better off you are.
 

ebeech121

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I'm getting a BS in Urban Policy Studies with a concentration in Planning and Economic Development.

So yes, they can be mixed.

:)

P.S. I go to Georgia State University and the Policy Studies is under the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies. I've heard it has a great grad program. Plus, Atlanta is a great city!

Come on down!
 

2020planner

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thanks for the replies, and thanks Elizabeth for the offer to visit Georgia!

what i am really curious about is how often people create their program with their own emphasis, but my intuition tells me this is probably more contingent on the school than the student
 

Suburb Repairman

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Check around. The school that I graduate from in 25 days has a MPA program with an emphasis in urban planning. If you don't mind taking a few extra hours, some schools offer a dual-degree program in public policy & planning.
 

ebeech121

Cyburbian
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Suburb Repairman said:
If you don't mind taking a few extra hours, some schools offer a dual-degree program in public policy & planning.

That's what I am doing. I started out as getting a BA in Sociology, then when I realized that the Soci department lied about using a soci degree in planning--long story--I applied to AYSPS* to do the dual-degree thing by adding a BS in policy studies.

*Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Since I probably would have gotten my Soci degree in about three and a half years and that all but one class of my core was completed, I just simply have to take the planning courses. Of course everyone is different and some schools are different.

I'm serious. Come check us out. Go to www . gsu . edu then click on colleges and schools (or something) and AYSPS. We're moving to a new building..new computer lab. ;) If I'm lucky there'll be Macs in that lab too.
 

2020planner

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1
good stuff, but I think that graduate programs are slightly different than undergrad programs.

from what i have gathered, it sounds like some programs have a public policy degree with a heavy emphasis on planning and some schools offer urban planning degrees with an emphasis on policy (and of course all of the stuff in between)
 

Masswich

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1,303
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Easy One

Rather than a joint degree, I would consider getting a planning degree (or a policy degree, for that matter) from one of the policy-oriented planning schools (or planning-oriented policy schools, for people who look at things from that end.)

Examples- the Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota (where I went), the Kennedy School at Harvard, NYU, Rutgers, etc.

I think getting one two-year degree that covers some of both subjects is more cost-effective than a joint degree. But if you just want to bide your time in grad school, by all means, get the joint degree...
 
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