Saving and repurposing grain elevators

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#21
I just noticed that you were probably looking at McHenry Point, a new development on the edge of the old neighborhood. It was completed in 2007.
They look nicely scaled, alley loaded garages. I'm guessing 3 units per entry stairwell.. or two units with the middle floor one being a duplex with the front end of the first floor (because of the garage). My guess is FAR 3 net, at close to 50 units an acre net. Affordable? Or some market rate too? Baltimore has some pleasantly surprising stuff...
 
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#22
They look nicely scaled, alley loaded garages. I'm guessing 3 units per entry stairwell.. or two units with the middle floor one being a duplex with the front end of the first floor (because of the garage). My guess is FAR 3 net, at close to 50 units an acre net. Affordable? Or some market rate too? Baltimore has some pleasantly surprising stuff...
Actually, they are all three-story townhomes, one unit per entrance. Each unit is between 2,200 to 2,400 square feet. All are market-rate. There are 121 units in the development, which covers about 6.1 acres if you include the streets, alleyways and open space (which cover 3 acres). Each unit sits on about 1100 SF of land on average. When they sold, each unit went for about $500K to $600K, but this was in the boom years of 2005-07. Now they seem to be selling in the $300-$400K range if they come up for sale at all. Interestingly, one of the units that came up for sale recently sat on a 1,307 SF lot, and that tiny lot was assessed at $160K (structure was $388K). Wow. The assessed value of the entire project in 2009 was $53 million, or $8.7 million per acre. The development was built by Pulte, and was their first in-city townhome project.
 
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#25
A project in Copenhagen converted a pair of silos into Condos. Some images can be found here: The Frosilo
That's pretty cool. However, it seems that most of these silo conversions don't really use the silo for much. The Frosilo hangs the condos off of the outside and just uses the inside for an atrium (which I assume contains stairs and elevator shafts). Silo Point (above) ended up ripping out the majority of the silos and just keeping a few on the outside corners for decoration. Very few (like the Quaker Square Inn) seem to be able to reuse the silos as an outer shell and create living or working space inside them.
 
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