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school smogasboard, Clemson to CalPoly

Tall Fella'

Cyburbian
Messages
56
Points
4
Wow,

People really read and respond to questions on here! I mentioned in a previous post that I'm looking at grad schools and have an interest in urban design and transportation planning.

I don't have an architecutural background, rather, I did journalism and environmental studies minor for undergrad.

So, I live in NC right now, but I'm thinking I might like a change of location for a while, which is why I'm looking at Cal Poly, Univ. of New Mexico, Portland State Unv. I've gotten lots of suggestions for northeastern and southern schools, but I also want to hear from people about western schools.

Thanks y'all!
 

Greenescapist

Cyburbian
Messages
1,169
Points
24
I looked at the University of Washington. It's beautiful and in a cool area of Seattle. They have a big focus on design. I'm not sure about transportation, but they have an engineering school - so that gives them some strength. I go to U of Wisc-Madison. Not a big design focus here, but they are trying to grow their transporation planning program. There is now a joint program with engineering and policy that you should look at. UW's engineering department and facilities are top-notch. GA Tech is big in transporatation, I think. It might be hard to find school that balances the two well. They are very different.
 

Kathie_WE

Cyburbian
Messages
34
Points
2
Before returning to grad school in '02 I was worried because the closest -- and most cost effective -- program for me was a small program at a HBCU. Well now that its 7 months from graduation, I am glad to be there and proud to be graduating from Morgan.

Having gone through the process, here's my advice on picking a planning school (for what its worth) -- pick an area you want to live in, meet with the professors and see if you are interested in their projects, talk to the students to see if you fit in, and finally talk to some professionals in the area to see what they say about the program. Also look at the school's other program -- in my case the professor who has been my primary advisor, professor, and mentor is from the landscape architecture program. Don't worry about the name -- so long as it is accredited it really doesn't matter!

Also do consider cost. Remember, planners don't make a lot of $$$ so you don't want have more student loan debt then you will be able to handle. I met Dr. Tom Daniels from U Penn as part of my thesis study and he said, "What you didn't want to get in debt for life by going to UPenn?" A consultant I met with today gave me this advice, "Planners need to be aware of the cost of school and the salary they will make."

In the end, grad school is what you make of it. The effort and commitment to the projects, studies, and assignment you put in will determine what you get out of the program and your education. Good luck on finding the right school for you. I hope you enjoy your educational experience!
 

Dharmster

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
Very few borrow for expen$ive schools

I think that their may some confusion as to who attends planning programs at private universities (such as Penn, Columbia, Harvard, MIT, and U$C) as to how much they actually pay.

First of all, underrepresented minorities that attend these universities may be eligible for diversity fellowships and aid so they may not be paying the full cost. Secondly, I suspect the majority of students probably recieve some non loan aid, as that's probably part of the marketing strategy (we'll give you 8K of merit aid, now just fork over the balance of the tuition). Finally, these private universities probably have a high proportion of international students who are sponsored by either their families or foreign governmens.

Also many of the people that attend these schools don't pay for them. They get help from their generous parents. In other cases, they managed to get their undergraduate educations without incurring debt or managed to pay it off so they don't feel overwhelmed by borrowing for their graduate studies.

In short, I'd have a strong hunch that only a fraction of students who went to private universities for masters degrees in urban planning come out with $60K of debt.

Kathie_WE said:

Also do consider cost. Remember, planners don't make a lot of $$$ so you don't want have more student loan debt then you will be able to handle. I met Dr. Tom Daniels from U Penn as part of my thesis study and he said, "What you didn't want to get in debt for life by going to UPenn?" A consultant I met with today gave me this advice, "Planners need to be aware of the cost of school and the salary they will make."
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
Dharmster:

Really, I'm not trying to flame or anything but please... What is your deal with private and Ivy League schools? The only threads you seem to post are those preaching the superiority of an Ivy League, or UNC and Georgia Tech, education. Do you work for Princeton Review or something?

Honestly, it's getting tiresome.
 

Dharmster

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
I wasn't preaching the superiority of any of the schools, just point out white I feel is misconception. I know some some graduates of private universities and NONE of them borrowed anywhere near the full cost.

I would actually agree with the original poster about the costs of attending a private school. In fact, I often urged people in prior posts NOT to go to a private university if they were having to pay/borrow it themselves.



biscuit said:
Dharmster:

The only threads you seem to post are those preaching the superiority of an Ivy League, or UNC and Georgia Tech, education.

Honestly, it's getting tiresome.
 
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