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Second careers: what to do next?

Joe Iliff

Reformed City Planner
Messages
1,441
Points
28
I know for most people, planning is their second career, at least in the sense that they get an undergraduate degree in something else and a graduate degree in planning, or switch into planning after years of working in a related field.

But, what about those of us who get an undergrad in planning and start working in the field right out of college. Where do you go for something different? Do you go to grad school for a different degree, or start working in a related field?

I'm not ready to stop planning yet, and even if I do study or work in related field, I'd probably come back to planning later. But, I've got a lot of my career still in front of me and like to think about these things?

Any ideas about good second degrees or careers for first degree/career planners?

Thanks!
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,853
Points
38
I'm with you Planzilla - my dream is to become a landu use attorney. But the cost of getting there......ouch!!
 

Planzilla

Cyburbian
Messages
45
Points
2
After over twenty years in planning, I am starting law school in August. Land use law looks like a growing field to me. Yeah, I know planners have lots of gripes about lawyers (and I bet I'm going to hear them all again), but I'm tired of beating my head against reality. Every controversial issue I have been involved in for the last ten years ended up in the hands of lawyers--who usually knew very little about planning and had to be briefed by us planners. So instead of fighting the legal profession, I say infiltrate them and take them over from the inside. Planners of the world, unite! And take the law school entrance exam. You have nothing to lose but that dingy office in the annex.
 

Planzilla

Cyburbian
Messages
45
Points
2
FLplanner, it may not be as bad as you think. The law school business is pretty competitive, and the way to improve your school's reputation is to attract the best students. If you do well on the Law School Admission Test, you will be inundated by law schools offering you financial aid. And even if you aren't too good at taking tests, there is still a surprising amount of aid available. Some schools will give you a discount on tuition if you agree to work in the public sector for a certain number of years. (So you go back to your old city and spend a few years suing mobile home park operators--could be fun.) Take a look at lsac.org to get more info.
 

Henry Daid

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
I wonder about picking your second career out of frustration? I tend to think those of us who have pursued intellectual careers overflowing with human interaction may need to go raise vegetables, carve wooden doors, weld, etc.
 

BR

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
I just interveiwed for a newly created City Administrator position in my hometown (pop. 5500) and think I might actually have a chance. I have a degree in planning and only two years of experience. I'm starting to wonder how sane I am for even considering a move like this. Anyone else agree?
 

biha

Cyburbian
Messages
25
Points
2
I think plumbing would be a great second career for planners. In planning, one can labor for days, weeks or months without seeing an appreciable product. Plumbing, however, requires technical competence and at the end of the day, there's a measurable and visible product. As for salary, the plumber wins hands down!
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
33
I'm thinking Train Conductor would be nice. Simple decisions.

forward

reverse

forward

reverse

break time

(repeat)
 
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