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Setback question - need help

mallen

Cyburbian
Messages
144
Points
6
Setbacks, setbacks.

Does anyone know a good way to effectively and consistently handle all of the potential setback interpretations? I have seen development handbooks that attempt to show some configurations. Does anyone know of these types of examples online?

My specific question relates to how to handle rear yard setbacks for odd shaped lots (very odd shaped, like pointed at the rear, or even curving lots)? Particularly multi-sided lots, corner and triangular-shaped lots?

Thanks for the help.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
As for your odd-shaped lots, it's pretty common to start measuring a setback only when the minimum lot width is reached. For example a flag lot, you don't measure from the street but on the flag portion. Same principles can be applied to any lot.

Multi sided?? Aren't they all? No I know what you mean. You shouldn't allow side lot lines to intersect the right of way at an angle which is not radial or perpendicular. It's just not good engineering. So that would establish your side lot lines and setbacks, and everything else is the rear property line. You can start getting into angles of intersection and deflection with the right of way to furhter define too.

Corner lots usually get a front yard setback on the 2 sides that front the street, rear yard on the remaining 2 if the house is canted, if not only the side hat faces the rear of the house
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
30
Determining the rear usually causes the most problems. Our code definition of Lot Line, Rear:

That property boundary that is opposite to the front lot line. For zoning dimensional requirements and where lot lines are irregular, the rear lot lot line shall be deemed to be a line not less than twenty feet long, lying within the lot and parallel to the front lot line at its midpoint.

A bit confusing when you read it, but try it out on few examples and it makes sense. It creates a straight line across the rear for measuring.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
29
We got around this by defining all of the types of lot lines(front, side, rear) using lehman's zoning dictionary, then having a requirement for "any lot line not specifically mentioned or defined". The setback for the "other" is the same as a side yard.

And as for MIkeD's suggestion, we actually do it backwards to that. We measure the frontage(width) of a lot at the minimum setback.
 

Rhys Rowland

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
Setbacks for Irregular Shaped Lots

In Davis, for the case of a triangular or gore shaped lot we define a rear lot line as "a line ten feet in length within the lot, parallel to and at the maximum distance for the front lot line.

Its a bit vague as much of our code is, but I hope that provides some help!

Rhys
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Re: Setbacks for Irregular Shaped Lots

Rhys Rowland said:
In Davis, for the case of a triangular or gore shaped lot we define a rear lot line as "a line ten feet in length within the lot, parallel to and at the maximum distance for the front lot line.

Its a bit vague as much of our code is, but I hope that provides some help!

Rhys
In a triangular lot there are no parallel lines.

Bad ordinance....bad.

How 'bout the line which is the furthest distance from the street right of way.
 
Messages
3
Points
0
I am not sure that I would find a way to handle the interpretation of setbacks through graphic representation unless your area in question is one that falls within a redevelopment area or some type of an overlay district - where you may be looking for more "different" setbacks. Regarding odd-shaped lots, in general, within typical subdivisions, I would recommend handling the problem via policy if it is not clear in your Code. In other words, if that triangular lot (one that points to the rear) has the rear of a home facing it on the left, and then the side of a home facing it on the right, then logically you would call out your rear setbacks for the subject property from the property line that faces the rear-facing home on the left. Make sense?? In other words, look at the existing character of the neighborhood to help you make those calls. In some instances, you can actually have 2 frontyard setbacks (for a lot that is pointed in the front), unless the house is situated in such a way that the front facade faces one plane more than the other, or if the garage is pulled to one side more than the other.
 

zonerlbc

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
In a triangular lot there are no parallel lines.

Bad ordinance....bad.

How 'bout the line which is the furthest distance from the street right of way.

No, what he's saying is that you DRAW a line parallel to the front line. This is common and is how several (most, in my experience) zoning codes deal with the rear line issue on a triangular lot.

Moderator note:

You do realize this is a 13-year old thread, right?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

zonerlbc

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
No, what he's saying is that you DRAW a line parallel to the front line. This is common and is how several (most, in my experience) zoning codes deal with the rear line issue on a triangular lot.

Moderator note:

You do realize this is a 13-year old thread, right?
I do, and when I am searching for an answer to something on the internet, even 13 year old information can be incorrect or be enhanced by clarification in the hopes that henceforth, anyone encountering this thread may be less confused about how this type of setback is often treated. :) :thumbsup:
 
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