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Home stuff 🏡 Show us the first house you lived in whether you remember it or not

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,621
Points
29
A social media post I recently saw of how many places in which you lived had me thinking of the first home I lived in until I was 10 years old. Great neighborhood to live, 1/2 acre lot, lake down the street, woods to play in and build treehouses. Trees are much larger and I have not lived here in 40 years. And my total count of places lived or that of my legal residence in 50 years is 19 locations. When I lived in this house, I thought it was so big. My parents were the first owners and I think paid $35k in 1970. Sold in 1981 for $108k. Most recent county records show a sale price of $343k in 2003. I did visit while at the nearby NPC and the owners let me walk through the house. Exterior the same for the most part. The bay window has been added and the windows and door have been replaced.

I thought I may have done a post similar to this years ago but did not find one. We can do it again.

185 (2).PNG
 

The Terminator

Cyburbian
Messages
1,736
Points
25
When I was brought home from the maternity ward in my parents MkII VW Jetta GL in April 1991, my first ever home was this apartment complex in Yonkers, NY. They owned a 1br here from 1988-1997. It was close to public transit, walkable to a hospital, bagel shop, candy store and a Grand Union grocery store. It was a good place to live, but they did not want to put me in City schools. That, and when my sister came along in '95, they needed to upgrade and that is what lead us to move further into Westchester County in search of better schools and exponentially higher property taxes :p


IMG_20210503_183958_981.jpg
 

ExRocketSci

Cyburbian
Messages
33
Points
2
My home for my first 22 years, and my current home. Classic 1926 Buffalo Double on the north side. Purchased by my grandparents in the 1940s, who lived upstairs with my mother and uncles. When my parents married, they lived and raised us kids downstairs. 3 bedrooms 1 bath per unit, I shared my 10 x 9.5 bedroom with 2 brothers. After my grandparents passed on, one uncle continued to live upstairs for several decades until he passed away, and my parents continued living downstairs after all of us kids had grown. The upstairs remained vacant for 20 years, until one of my siblings moved back after my father passed, and when my mother needed help right before she died. My wife and I then renovated much of the interior, and made the upstairs our permanent home, while the downstairs continues to be occupied by family members.

The neighborhood has changed quite a bit, as behind the yards across the street had been 3 active railroad lines and a coal company. It is now the most in-demand neighborhood in the city, with a bike path and apartments in the works for the long abandoned ROW.


IMG_0565 by Me, on Flickr
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,915
Points
73
My home for my first 22 years, and my current home. Classic 1926 Buffalo Double on the north side. Purchased by my grandparents in the 1940s, who lived upstairs with my mother and uncles. When my parents married, they lived and raised us kids downstairs. 3 bedrooms 1 bath per unit, I shared my 10 x 9.5 bedroom with 2 brothers. After my grandparents passed on, one uncle continued to live upstairs for several decades until he passed away, and my parents continued living downstairs after all of us kids had grown. The upstairs remained vacant for 20 years, until one of my siblings moved back after my father passed, and when my mother needed help right before she died. My wife and I then renovated much of the interior, and made the upstairs our permanent home, while the downstairs continues to be occupied by family members.

The neighborhood has changed quite a bit, as behind the yards across the street had been 3 active railroad lines and a coal company. It is now the most in-demand neighborhood in the city, with a bike path and apartments in the works for the long abandoned ROW.


IMG_0565 by Me, on Flickr
Let me guess..... photo taken in 1967?
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,831
Points
46
3 br 2 ba redbrick ranch - my late father replaced the original wrought iron porch posts with the squared wood columns...I had a bit of a, um, chat with him after I found out.

thumbnail
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,915
Points
73

Flint's better days already happened. :confused:
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,234
Points
55
My home for my first 22 years, and my current home. Classic 1926 Buffalo Double on the north side. Purchased by my grandparents in the 1940s, who lived upstairs with my mother and uncles. When my parents married, they lived and raised us kids downstairs. 3 bedrooms 1 bath per unit, I shared my 10 x 9.5 bedroom with 2 brothers. After my grandparents passed on, one uncle continued to live upstairs for several decades until he passed away, and my parents continued living downstairs after all of us kids had grown. The upstairs remained vacant for 20 years, until one of my siblings moved back after my father passed, and when my mother needed help right before she died. My wife and I then renovated much of the interior, and made the upstairs our permanent home, while the downstairs continues to be occupied by family members.

The neighborhood has changed quite a bit, as behind the yards across the street had been 3 active railroad lines and a coal company. It is now the most in-demand neighborhood in the city, with a bike path and apartments in the works for the long abandoned ROW.


IMG_0565 by Me, on Flickr

wow - this is so wonderful
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,778
Points
46
4 BR, 1.5 Ba, 2000 sq ft, fully remodeled basement, pretty solid house in Cheektowaga, just outside Buffalo. My parents moved in with my grandparents (who then owned the home) before I was born. My mom sold the house when I was in my 30s, a few years after my dad passed away. It was the only address I had when I left for college. The upstairs had a raised roof over part of the rear of the house (visible in the pic) where the fourth BR was. the third BR was 20 x 9 with sloped ceiling, which was the bedroom of two or three of us boys depending on how the other rooms were used over the years.

1620132783788.png
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
14,175
Points
57
Parents bought the house in 1960 & moved two blocks away into a condo in 1992.
Landscaping has gotten out of control & that pine was not there. We had darker color on the accent elements of the façade.
1620135415126.png
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,422
Points
60
Lived here from birth to 10 yrs old. My parents sold it in the late 1980s and the new owners put on the vinyl siding, enclosed the side sun porch (which had been all windows) and removed the glassed-in front entry porch...and promptly ruined the house.

334 house.jpg
 
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Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,820
Points
47

My parents rented this house until I was 4 years old when they moved to avoid mandatory school busing. I still have some very distinct memories from this home, including the time I got a thumbnail whacked off my hand while my brother and our neighbor were playing tetherball in the back yard.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,260
Points
35
So I don't know the exact housing unit. My first home was officer's housing on a military base. That specific housing area has since been privatized, updated, remodeled, removed, new construction, etc so I have no idea where my first home was/is anymore. I lived on this base for the first 9-10 months of my life.

https://www.google.com/maps/dir/current+location/21.4800732,-158.049857/@21.4981622,-158.066169,15z

The first house I remember was this one:

Childhood home

There were a lot more trees on the side, and we had a chain-link fence. The alley side had rosebushes when we were there.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,621
Points
29
So I don't know the exact housing unit. My first home was officer's housing on a military base. That specific housing area has since been privatized, updated, remodeled, removed, new construction, etc so I have no idea where my first home was/is anymore. I lived on this base for the first 9-10 months of my life.

https://www.google.com/maps/dir/current+location/21.4800732,-158.049857/@21.4981622,-158.066169,15z

The first house I remember was this one:

Childhood home

There were a lot more trees on the side, and we had a chain-link fence. The alley side had rosebushes when we were there.
Utility line box right in the middle of the sidewalk. Nice.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,814
Points
57
Screenshot 2021-05-04 153015.jpg


I had to reach out to my dad to get the info on this one. I have no idea on when it was built, but they rented this very humble two bedroom, one bath house in the town that I was born in. We moved away before I was two. My parents had almost no money (my mom got married the same month she graduated HS and I was born about 18 months later) She worked for a local drug store and my dad was working at a local radio station. Neither of them had taken any college classes and had zero savings.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,191
Points
52
1620157793751.png


Here's the 1920s cinderblock farmhouse I lived in until I was in 3rd grade when we moved about a mile down the road. I don't really remember much about the house but I recall it having a very large kitchen and mudroom. The mud room was large enough that I recall us butchering a bull in there one very cold winter day; the bull had slipped on ice in the barnyard and broken a leg. It was too cold to butcher it outside, couldn't do it in the milkbarn for sanitary reasons, and we couldn't get it quickly enough to the guy's facility where we'd normally take animals to be butchered and processed. So my dad lifted it with an endloader, and he and my older brothers and a Serbian neighbor brought it into the mudroom so the Serb could butcher it in the warmth of the house, pack everything up, and then let the blood drain down the floor drain. Country livin'!

My parents sold the house and about 10 acres of the property when we moved down the road but still own about 60 acres in this spot and grow hay and lease some of the land to a wheat farmer and we take the straw. They've got it parceled into roughly equal-sized lots for each of us kids. My oldest brother actually built a house next door to this one and he and his wife and kids live there. If and when a parcel ever becomes mine, I plan to sign it over to whichever of my nephews I like most that month. Or maybe if I don't like my siblings I'll keep my parcel and start mining gravel there...
 
Messages
3,006
Points
25
The Bronx, NYC
First floor apartment in this building on The Grand Concourse.
No trees around there at that time.
Grand_Concourse_Bldg_Bronx_NY.jpg

Walkable to almost anything.
Lower left corner of building had/has a major 24/7 bus stop in front of it.
Next to the bus stop was an entrance to a 24/7 subway station.


On Google Maps, 1st floor of building (upper right side) is not painted red:
^Must have been recorded during last autumn's 2nd wave of the pandemic, because
The Grand Concourse is usually packed with cars, public transit vehicles, and pedestrians.
.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,242
Points
71
My childhood house looks terrible in Google Streetview. Keep in mind it's in a neighborhood that changed a lot since I grew up there. The lift was added long after my parents moved out.

childhood_house.jpg


The house was one of hundreds of Kinsey bungalows in northeast Buffalo, all built in the 1920s, most to the same standard plan. It probably looked like this when it was first built.

kinsey_bungalow.jpg


Sometime in the 1950s, the facade was "modernized", with the front porch replaced by a vestibule and stoop, giving it a pseudo-Colonial look. The front had wood siding; the side and rear were clad in Insulbrick. My parents bought the house from the original owner in 1962. They reclad the house with vinyl siding in the early 1980s.

After I graduated from college and moved away, Mom and Dad moved to a much bigger house in suburban Amherst.

amherst.jpg


On October 20, 2014, my childhood house burnt down. The site is now a vacant lot.

fire_01.jpg
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,617
Points
44
In the Hyland Hills neighborhood in Beaverton, Oregon.

 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,915
Points
73
The first house I actually remember living in (moved into at age 2) was this one in Flushing, MI

 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,422
Points
60
NHP - Oh my gawd like how could you have lived in such horrible conditions and survived? How did you ever make it through life without joining a druggy gang and getting a tattoo and being a miscreant and....with such a small front yard?

You're one of the lucky ones for sure.

PHEW!
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
10,131
Points
45
NHP - Oh my gawd like how could you have lived in such horrible conditions and survived? How did you ever make it through life without joining a druggy gang and getting a tattoo and being a miscreant and....with such a small front yard?

You're one of the lucky ones for sure.

PHEW!

Dad: NHP, go mow the lawn.
NHP: Done (walking back in the house with scissors)
There's actually more yard than you would think...it was actually one of the larger lots in the neighborhood...

aerial.jpg
 
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