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Subservient chicken

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,439
Points
40
Try "cartwheel". For "Stand on one foot", he sat in the chair and smelled one foot.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
Is this really live? It's a bit disturbing...

Edit: It looks like a bunch of looped tapes for different key words. Or at least during the time that I tried it.
 
Last edited:

Doitnow

Cyburbian
Messages
496
Points
16
I asked for the chicken to be Roasted and then Grilled and there was no reaction at all.
I should try something else maybe.
:-\
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Words can not describe my feelings about this. Scary. I typed in that he should get himself a beer and he walked up to the camera and and shoke his finger saying no, no. Type in Michael Jackson.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
Rumpy Tunanator said:
Type in Michael Jackson.

Good call! Typing "YMCA" gets a good reaction as well. Despite looking like a rooster, he does respond to "lay an egg".
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
I'm sorry but that is just kind of disturbing. B-)


He will also do the obvious "Run around like a chicken with it's head cut off."
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
He squats pretty good. I love this site, but just think about it. Someone is getting paid to watch our commands and perform them in a chicken suit. I wonder what it pays?
 

Floridays

Cyburbian
Messages
769
Points
21
It sat on the chair when I typed in "sit down," but it just got up and moved around aimlessly when I told it to turn on the TV. Bad chicken! :eek:|
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
wonderful little ap. It is obvious that many of the actions were prerecorded and are queued up based up on some keywords and phrases.
 
Messages
5,352
Points
31
boiker said:
wonderful little ap. It is obvious that many of the actions were prerecorded and are queued up based up on some keywords and phrases.

I agree. The chicken didn't quite know how to do the "electic slide" or how to "drop it like it's hot." :-D
 

GeogPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,433
Points
25
"party like it's 1999" gets some air guitar
"go to burger king" gets a close-up thumbs up

"prepare a comprehensive plan" and the chicken does nothing...surprised?
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
Rumpy Tunanator said:
OMG, see what happens when you type in tacos. Is that his girlfriend? Don't worry, its work safe.

I don't want to know what possessed you to put in tacos. Ask him to turn off the lights? He has a clapper. Tuna, isn't the clap --- per your favorite thing.

Ask him to kiss and he swanks around.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,449
Points
25
boiker said:
wonderful little ap. It is obvious that many of the actions were prerecorded and are queued up based up on some keywords and phrases.

Yep - watch his feet at the end of an action - they 'jump' slightly as the clip ends, and the light in the room changes.

I have not been studying the chicken 8-!
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Budgie said:
What is he doing when you type in "stage"?

Don't know :-0 , but he also does something weird with "show". "Tacos" is still the weirdest. How does a guy dressed like a chicken performing on your demand get a girl to dance with him, let alone in his apartment B-).

The dancing with the girl also happens if you type in "random"
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,866
Points
61
Poultry-Geist
Print subtitle: If we're so sick of marketing, why are we watching this chicken?

Consumed By Rob Walker
Published: May 23, 2004 Sunday NY Times Magazine

Subservientchicken.com
A few weeks ago the market-research firm Yankelovich Partners released a study that will surprise almost no one. Some 61 percent of the consumers it polled agreed with the assertion that advertising is ''out of control,'' and 60 percent said they feel ''much more'' negative about it than they did a few years ago. ''Consumer resistance to marketing reaches all-time high,'' the report announced. The trade magazine Advertising Age soon published commentary from Gary Ruskin, executive director of Commercial Alert, a nonprofit devoted to curbing commercial culture. ''In the U.S. and across the planet,'' Ruskin wrote, ''there are myriad signs of a growing revolt against the advertising industry.''

And yet, at almost the exact moment that Yankelovich was releasing its findings, the latest e-mail craze zipping around the Web was to pass along a link to a site called subservientchicken.com. Once there, you were greeted with a Webcam-type view of a bland living room and a person in a chicken suit. You could type in commands (''sleep,'' ''moonwalk,'' ''do Pilates'') and this chicken would, subserviently, comply. Subservientchicken.com has received more than 215 million hits, according to its creator -- which happens to be an advertising firm called Crispin Porter & Bogusky, acting on behalf of a client, Burger King. The whole thing, in other words, is an ad, which is why you see the Burger King logo when the site is loading, and it's why there is a link on the site labeled ''BK TenderCrisp,'' which takes you to the fast-food chain's home page. According to Crispin Porter, the average visitor to the subservient chicken site spends seven minutes there.

So, if we're all so sick of advertising, why are millions of us spending our free moments interacting with an ad and then forwarding it to all of our friends?

The answer has to be more than just some latent cultural desire to dominate the chicken-suited. Another recent online ad -- actually, just the online version of a widely broadcast TV spot for Adidas, in which the magic of special effects enables Muhammad Ali's boxer daughter to hurl punches at her father -- has been streamed more than five million times. And American Express has run television ads starring Jerry Seinfeld and Superman that are essentially teasers for longer online ads with the same characters; the first ''Webisode'' has also attracted millions of viewers. In a postmodern move, Seinfeld actually hit the talk-show circuit to promote his new Web commercials. On ''The Daily Show,'' the host, Jon Stewart, skipped the truth-to-power irreverence that has made him a hero to media-savvy young people and politely quizzed Seinfeld about his new project -- a bunch of ads.

Where's the outrage? It turns out that even Gary Ruskin draws a distinction between the ads we hate and the ads we actively seek out. ''This is not coercive,'' he says; it's basically opt-in entertainment, rather than something you can't avoid or that ''clobbers'' you to get attention. ''That strategy is going to work as people get more and more fed up with advertising,'' he adds. Alex Bogusky, a partner in the ad firm that hatched the chicken stunt, says almost the exact same thing: ''It's not all that different from just regular entertainment.''

Perhaps, then, these little films and games don't really count as advertising at all. Bob Garfield, an Ad Age critic, gave low marks to both subservientchicken.com and the Seinfeld series for essentially that reason. It does seem worth asking if even an infinite number of e-mailed links actually sell any more TenderCrisp sandwiches. But Bogusky calls that critique ridiculous. ''If consumers like your brand, they're more likely to go experience your brand,'' he says. ''So it's no different than a charming television commercial -- except that, on average, people spend seven minutes with it.'' He also compares the project to Golden Age television, when ''Texaco Star Theater'' or ''The U.S. Steel Hour'' used a sponsorship model that presented quality entertainment and relatively subtle branding-by-association. Of course Burger King is not financing productions of Paddy Chayefsky or Arthur Miller -- it's financing productions by an advertising firm. But maybe the ad firms are the ones that really know how to create the kind of entertainment that draws a crowd these days. The success of the subservient chicken is, if nothing else, certainly a very powerful advertisement for that very idea.
 

Floridays

Cyburbian
Messages
769
Points
21
yep, we're basically supporting a big marketing campaign:

Having it their way. With 20-something men tuning out prime-time TV, how can advertisers reach them? Burger King has a new recipe: late-night TV and the Web. BK's new campaign, by hot Miami ad agency Crispin Porter & Bogusky, revived its "Have It Your Way" slogan with spots showing workers in a dreary office fighting for bragging rights over the most creative burger. Then, to introduce the TenderCrisp chicken sandwich, CPB created a vaguely seedy website where users can make demands of a person dressed as a chicken; the site garnered 168 million hits in just 17 days. So far, the campaign seems to be working: TenderCrisp sales have been rising 9 percent per week.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
14,026
Points
58
hahahahahahahahaha, this is classic advertising schtick.

[smug ad exec voice]This will sell tons of deep-fried chicken to dull-witted 20-somethings, they love this irreverent sh*t. They'll spend half the night commanding this silly chicken to dance. By the way, let's go see my new Aston Martin[/smug ad exec voice]
 

Wannaplan?

Bounty Hunter
Messages
3,219
Points
29
These words provide entertaining responses:

sleep
read
sneeze
jumping jacks
olympics
relax
paranoid
climb
pain
math
overdose
jive
waddle
swim
subservientchicken
burger king
blanket
flame broiled
 
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