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Suburban Attractions

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Monday morning conversations with co-workers typically contain the following question: "what did you do this weekend?" It has become more apparent to me that my suburban co-workers never venture out of the suburbs, especially on the weekend. This baffles me because there is absolutely nothing in the N.O. suburbs, other than the large malls, that would make a sane person want to visit there or never leave on the weekend. The zoo, aquarium, museums, large parks, the French Market, the French Quarter, etc. are all located in the city.

So my question is, what attractions do your suburban areas have?
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,852
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39
I live in a small city that is essentially a suburb of Orlando. Since I am not into the downtown nightlife, we stay fairly close to home on weekends, too. Here are some "attractions" in our immediate area, some of which we visit, some not:
the Central FL zoo, hiking on natural lands, canoeing, fishing, small local museums (more interesting for my son), organized youth sports (we do soccer), city/county festivals (art, food, historic, ethnic, etc.), movie theaters, golf and other sports.

Of course the biggest attraction in any suburban area is Home Depot!

We do occasionally go downtown on weekends to the science center, museums, sporting events, etc. but how much of that can you do/afford?
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
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I live in the City and do 99% of my eating and drinking :b: in downtown. I try not to go to the burbs but that is where most of the shopping is now. Aside from the malls (if you can consider those attractions) the burbs to my south and west have a number of small lakes for kayaking and some nature areas/parks/preserves for short hikes.

All the culture, art, plays, museums, etc are downtown and that is where I spend most of my time and money.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
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When I lived in Buffalo, Denver, and Kansas City, I spent much of my free time in the city.

Cleveland has "urban suburbs" - suburban areas with a built environment and vibe that are decidedly urban. The dense, bohemian Coventry area is Cleveland Heights is just a few minutes from my house. Those living in the western suburbs head to Lakewood, a suburban city just west of downtown Cleveland, with the highest population density in Ohio.

That's not to say I don't go into Cleveland; I do, quite a bit. However, I don't go to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Tower City, Ohio City, West Side Market or another large major attraction every weekend.

With regards to ZG, Orlando is a very small city, and apart from the nightclubs and restaurants downtown and in the surrounding neighborhoods, there isn't much in the central city. Orlando is also quite small compared to the region around it; Orlando has some 180,000 people, with a metro of 1,500,000. Disney, Universal Studio, and most of the major attractions are south of the city. The City of Winter Park (as opposed to Winter Garden, may the peace and love of Dale Earnhardt Senior be with you) is an urban suburb; there's a very vibrant downtown, and it's just a few minutes north of downtown Orlando.
 

teshadoh

Cyburbian
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435
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At least in New Orleans, Ann Rice thinks there is something to do in suburban New Orleans :-# Speaking of which, where are the high end suburbs of New Orleans - are they in Mandeville? I can't imagine Ann Rice eating at Chili's ordering a Durango Roundup appetizer w/ a Hot Springs Avalanche smoothie.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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I tend to drive into the Bay Area quite a bit. Just to get a sense of urban vibrancy-to see people not trapped in 3000 pounds of steel (I know I drive there, but once I get there I'll walk around for hours).

My town has a pleasant, but very sleepy downtown with restaurants, a few bars with music (not a big nightclub person), etc. The biggest amenities of my town include great rural countryside for bicycling, a nice regional park with hills and a lake, an active farmers market in the summer. It doesn't have a lot of "shopping," so when I (rarely) need to go to shopping, I'll usually go to downtown San Francisco, downtown Sacramento, or Walnut Creek, an urbanizing suburban downtown setting. I hate traditional post-war enclosed shopping malls. I don't think I've been in Fairfield's mall (a "Westfield Shoppingtowne" damn you, you Australians for your silly trademarks :) ) in two or three years.
 
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teshadoh said:
At least in New Orleans, Ann Rice thinks there is something to do in suburban New Orleans :-# Speaking of which, where are the high end suburbs of New Orleans - are they in Mandeville? I can't imagine Ann Rice eating at Chili's ordering a Durango Roundup appetizer w/ a Hot Springs Avalanche smoothie.
Most of the money has moved across Lake Ponchartain to the Northshore, ironically advertised as "North New Orleans." AS IF!!!!! Sprawl and growing pains is hitting that side of the lake extremely hard yet people are still moving over there in search of the "quiet, country life." Once the entire area is paved, most will come screaming back to the city.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
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Planderella said:
Most of the money has moved across Lake Ponchartain to the Northshore, ironically advertised as "North New Orleans." AS IF!!!!! Sprawl and growing pains is hitting that side of the lake extremely hard yet people are still moving over there in search of the "quiet, country life." Once the entire area is paved, most will come screaming back to the city.
Is that where Anne Rice is moving to? It must be cool if she is doing it. ;-)
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
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6,544
Points
30
Most of the little towns around Edmonton have something to do either in town or nearby.

St. Albert has the largest outdoor farmer's market in Western Canada. Many people come up from Edmonton just to go to the farmer's market. Also, there is the Big Lake area in St. Albert, which is considered a 'globally significant' "Important Bird Area". Riverside multiuse trails connect the Big Lake area with all parts of the City. A provincial recreation area is also located on the north side of the City, which is devoted to cross-country skiing and hiking (dependent on the season).

The town of Devon, a southwest suburb of Edmonton, sports the Devonian Botanic Gardens.

A lot of cities around here have *huge* multi-purpose leisure centres, which may have anything from indoor soccer, ice hockey, baskeball, huge swimming pools and water parks, to bowling, exercise facilities, etc. Often there are minor league (juniors) games associated with them.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
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Hmmm this is Phoenix.....so everything? Most recent: The Phoenix Coyotes and Arizona Cardinals moved their franchises to new stadiums built in the middle of farm fields in Glendale,AZ
 

pete-rock

Cyburbian
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1,550
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I've always thought that Detroit's suburbs had more in terms of attractions than any suburbs I know of. Conversely, the city lacks a lot.
 
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