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Super List of Planning Jargon

Wannaplan?

Ready to Learn
Messages
3,247
Points
30
Appropriateness

I used that frigging screwed-up word in some hand-written draft text that is now being word processed. I just consulted my thesaurus and I found a better word: suitability. I'm still not satisfied since I'm afraid it might confuse my client into thinking that I mean suitability analysis, which I certainly I am not trying to do.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,461
Points
29
Oh No! I just invented my very own piece of jargon

"A Common Thematic Public Art Element"

I am so ashamed!
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,448
Points
25
We call the area between the footpath and the kerb the verge or grass verge
 

Doitnow

Cyburbian
Messages
495
Points
16
NErudite
Scope creep happens so many times but usage of those terms...thats something new.

MIke I wish critical paths are followed. Do tell me where and how much they are followed.
:)
 

bud

Cyburbian
Messages
190
Points
7
Plannerspeak

Plannerspeak

We've heard of legalese or “Lawyerspeak”; have you heard of Archispeak? An article in Architectural Record, October 1999, p.79, "Critique" by Robert Campbell (also see letters to the editor following in December or January) discussed that (I guess you might call it, Orwellian) issue.

What about Plannerspeak: for example, words like, egress and ingress rather than off and on, or exit and entrance ramp?

bud...
:u:
 

tsc

Cyburbian
Messages
1,900
Points
23
Upzoning and Downzoning....it means something different to everyone.
 

geobandito

Cyburbian
Messages
509
Points
16
"Another tool in the ...."

.... toolbox

.... toolkit

and just when I was completely sick of those, I recently heard.... toolchest.
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,225
Points
25
^-- Looks like you need to buy some more stuff for the 'ole Tool Cabinet.

(there might be something in the Tool Closet.)
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
Points
45
If I never hear the phrase “proportionate share mitigation” again I will be happy.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,425
Points
71
Similar to what Bud said, around here, there's no such thing as a driveway. It's called an ingress-egress, used as a noun.

Nobody uses the word "use", either. Instead, planners utilize.

In other parts of the US, there are clear differences between a lot (a single legally defined and subdivided building lot), tract (an unbuildable lot, such as land used in a development for an entry feature or open space), and parcel (collection of lots, the term used in a specific context; "The parcel of two lots will be divided into 10 lots."). Here in Northeast Ohio, lot, tract and parcel all mean the same thing.

The area between the sidewalk and the street is universally called the tree lawn.
 

sisterceleste

Cyburbian
Messages
1,519
Points
22
BKM said:
This is way, way trivial, but the good ones have been taken!

Overall, I hate "verbing" good nouns: "prioritize" and the like. "Utilize" is the worst-why not just utilize "use"? :)

I also hate the term "signage"
I agree. I also hate the "verbing" of good nouns and always use the word "rank" instead of "prioritize". Did you know that "fed ex" is now a verb?????
By the way, signage is not in the dictionary.
 

CosmicMojo

Member
Messages
543
Points
16
Dan said:
The area between the sidewalk and the street is universally called the tree lawn.
Wow, I have never heard that one. In RVA we call it a landscape strip, planting strip or a grass strip. It's definitely a strip to me, not a lawn.
curious:)
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,165
Points
30
Dan said:
Similar to what Bud said, around here, there's no such thing as a driveway. It's called an ingress-egress, used as a noun.


IMO, the only time ingress and egress should be used is if it is one... or the other, but not both. We've had businesses where one entry is "ingress only". I can live with that. Otherwise, it's simply an access.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,449
Points
55
I hate the use of word "community" - like it's one happy Thanksgiving dinner - it's overused

and the use of the word architect to not describe what we formally know as an architect - as in the architect of the bylaw...

the one that sends me over the top is "functionality" - what the hell is that?

but my favorite acronyms that make me laugh are:

NIMEY - Not in my election year
NOPE - Not on Planet Earth
NOTE - Not over there either
NIML - Not in my lifetime
 

UKPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
42
Points
2
Here's some from the UK,

Amenity
Curtilage
Streetscape
Streetscene
Spatial qualities
45 degree rule
Apartments (they are flats!)
Overdevelopment
Obligations
Nimby (not in my back yard)
Banana (Build absolutely nothing anywhere never again)
PD rights
Affordable housing
Disproportinate
Detract
Dominant

I could go on and on...
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,762
Points
71
Adding to luckless pedestrian's list of favorite acronyms:

NIMTO - Not In My Term Office
and for those that are appointed and reappointed endlessly that can be a lifetime. :r:
 

bud

Cyburbian
Messages
190
Points
7
Honesty

Mastiff said:
IMO, the only time ingress and egress should be used is if it is one... or the other, but not both. We've had businesses where one entry is "ingress only". I can live with that. Otherwise, it's simply an access.

Why not simply say entry or "in"? Why use Latin terminology? That was to have ended with Vatican II. The idea is to get rid of pretentiousness so that we can better learn to be perfectly honest in our language and all our dealings with each other.

bud...
:l:
 
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Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,901
Points
48
Dan said:
The area between the sidewalk and the street is universally called the tree lawn.

I have taken it as my personal mission --after having been introduced to the term at this very website -- to introduce the noun *verge* for this so-called tree lawn, grass plat, planting strip, what-have-you?, area of no-man's land. Please stop and join me in this cause. streetguttercurbvergewalkpropertyline;-) ;-) ;-)
 

Joe Iliff

Reformed City Planner
Messages
1,435
Points
29
Gedunker said:
I have taken it as my personal mission --after having been introduced to the term at this very website -- to introduce the noun *verge* for this so-called tree lawn, grass plat, planting strip, what-have-you?, area of no-man's land. Please stop and join me in this cause. streetguttercurbvergewalkpropertyline;-) ;-) ;-)

So . . . you have the urge to verge ? . . . . :-D
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,425
Points
71
Four-sided design: architectural details on the front facade of a building are included on all walls, including back walls that normally aren't visible to the public.

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BKM said:
"A Common Thematic Public Art Element"
I am so ashamed!

I'll take credit for mechanical commerical, if it shows up elsewhere in print. I use the term to describe that not-quite-retail, not-quite-industrial mix of vehicle and contractor-related businesses like auto body shops, heavy equipment rental, auto parts stores, mini-storage, vehicle accessory sales, mulch and stone dealers, and other non-manufacturing businesses primarily related to the internal combustion engine and building trades. Think "Town Next Door."

UKPlanner said:
Curtilage

What's curtilage? "Doctor, I've been coughing up some nasty green and yellow curtilage lately." :D

I'd really like to create a US/Canada/UK/Australia planning term translation guide.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,425
Points
71
Old and busted: redevelopment
New hotness: refill
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,165
Points
30
bud said:
Why not simply say entry or "in"? Why use Latin terminology? That was to have ended with Vatican II. The idea is to get rid of pretentiousness so that we can better learn to be perfectly honest in our language and all our dealings with each other.

bud...
:l:

Because they mean different things, really. An entry can be in ingress, but it can mean other things as well (And "in" has numerous definitions). To me it's just an easier word to use, that frankly, needs no further explanation. I'm not writing a staff report for the general public, even if they have every right to read it. It's for my Planning Commission or City Council, and if they don't know what "ingress" means, they need to learn...

Now when I'm speaking or giving the staff report, I'd probably say somthing like, "If there is only ingress for the property on X Street, then there is no concern of vehicles exiting across traffic, yada yada..." But I tend to write in more technical terms.
 

bud

Cyburbian
Messages
190
Points
7
Ok

Mastiff said:
Now when I'm speaking or giving the staff report, I'd probably say somthing like, "If there is only ingress for the property on X Street, then there is no concern of vehicles exiting across traffic, yada yada..." But I tend to write in more technical terms.

But why not say, "If vehicles can only enter this property from X Street, then there is no danger of exiting across traffic."

bud...
:l:
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,859
Points
29
I may have been hanging around lawyers too much, but I am tired of the term "arbitrary and capricious'. Do people talk like this in real life??

Also, our City Next Door uses the term "knox box", which I'd never heard of -- to describe the Key-to-the-City-opened, box mounted on the outside of all businesses that supposedly contains the actual key to the business -- in case of an emergency. :p Has anyone else heard of this??
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,762
Points
71
RandomPlanner... said:
Also, our City Next Door uses the term "knox box", which I'd never heard of -- to describe the Key-to-the-City-opened, box mounted on the outside of all businesses that supposedly contains the actual key to the business -- in case of an emergency. :p Has anyone else heard of this??
Yes I have, most Firefighters know about them.
 

Mtn Woman

Cyburbian
Messages
148
Points
6
RandomPlanner... said:
Also, our City Next Door uses the term "knox box", which I'd never heard of -- to describe the Key-to-the-City-opened, box mounted on the outside of all businesses that supposedly contains the actual key to the business -- in case of an emergency. :p Has anyone else heard of this??


Absolutely!! It is a blessing for all firefighters and insurance companies! Knox is the name of the company that is best known for this little gadgets. Simply put, commercial establishments would rather have emergency services able to gain access using a key than breaking in a door. Many automatic alarm activations turn out to be false alarms due to electrical surges, burnt toast, etc. Knox boxes allow fire personnel to enter without destroying the place.
 

Joe Iliff

Reformed City Planner
Messages
1,435
Points
29
I find lots of communities that require Knox Boxes. Know that "Knox" is a brand name, but is regularly used as the term for the whole industry (like Xeroxing something on a copy machine made by Oce). They can also be called key boxes, lock boxes, and super boxes.
 

Plan-it

Cyburbian
Messages
995
Points
20
NHPlanner said:
Damn right we do! :) Always called 'em frappes.....you should have seen the look on the face of the server when I asked for a frappe in Muncie, Indiana. ;)

The reason is because there is a difference between a frappe and a milkshake. A milkshake is milk and flavoring only. A frappe includes ice cream.:-D
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,165
Points
30
bud said:
But why not say, "If vehicles can only enter this property from X Street, then there is no danger of exiting across traffic."

bud...
:l:

Because then my Planning Commission is liable to make a motion on the issue in those terms, which don't translate legally. "Enter" is on the little arrow sign by the driveway... "Egress" is written into the finding of fact and motion to approve so we don't have problems down the road. (No pun intended.)

I don't use most of the buzzwords that are being mentioned here, but if it concerns legal terminology, especially as defined by city code, it's a different story. I've had way too many peckerheads try and read code their way to try and circumvent the intent...

Planner Hottie said:
CHAIN OF COMMAND

Public sector only I assume.

No... but incredibly important. Just ask any department that doesn't have a good chain of command...
 
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bud

Cyburbian
Messages
190
Points
7
Lawyer-speak

Mastiff said:
Because then my Planning Commission is liable to make a motion on the issue in those terms, which don't translate legally. "Enter" is on the little arrow sign by the driveway... "Egress" is written into the finding of fact and motion to approve so we don't have problems down the road. (No pun intended.)

I don't use most of the buzzwords that are being mentioned here, but if it concerns legal terminology, especially as defined by city code, it's a different story.

Then it is legalese or "Lawyer-speak" which is generally the case and the root of the problem. Lawyers have always exercised undue control of society. What is the remedy? YHWH provides - http://www.geocities.com/douglas36601/yhwh.html .

bud...
:l:
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,165
Points
30
bud said:
Then it is legalese or "Lawyer-speak" which is generally the case and the root of the problem. Lawyers have always exercised undue control of society. What is the remedy? YHWH provides - http://www.geocities.com/douglas36601/yhwh.html .

bud...
:l:

We are shifting a bit off the topic, but I will digress for just a moment to disagree. Not with the fact that using "ingress" over "enter" may lie in the need to have a legal definition, but that legalese is the root of a problem and that lawyers have undue control of society. In fact, it's the lawyers turned politician who have that power... and politicians in general.

In Henry the VI, Dick the Butcher says, "The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers." Most people think that's a knock on attorneys, but the opposite is true, it's actually high praise. I know as planner, I wouldn't want to implement new code without a review by our City Attorney. Why? Because I want it as watertight as a frog's butt, and he'll see angles that I just don't.

If you intend to eradicate "legalese", prepare to re-write volumes upon volumes of law that led up to where we are today. Some things must be written in certain unequivocal terms to leave no room for other interpretation or misunderstanding.
 

bud

Cyburbian
Messages
190
Points
7
The roots of jargon

Mastiff said:
I disagree... that legalese is the root of a problem and that lawyers have undue control of society. In fact, it's the lawyers turned politician who have that power... and politicians in general. I know as planner, I wouldn't want to implement new code without a review by our City Attorney. If you intend to eradicate "legalese", prepare to re-write volumes upon volumes of law that led up to where we are today.

Congress is about 80% Lawyers, now. Jefferson said if there were more than 20% it would be our undoing. It is not to eradicate legalese or Lawyer-speak or other Orwellian signs of social degeneration (such as Jane Jacobs pointed out in her last book, Dark Ages Ahead ) but to simply limit it to absolute necessity. I too would want to consult a lawyer if they were available to me; they have made themselves almost indispensable. I meant to say that all jargon probably had its roots in the practice of law and was mainly for show or intimidation or to confuse the issue rather than for any real need.

bud...
:l:
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,165
Points
30
bud said:
Congress is about 80% Lawyers, now. Jefferson said if there were more than 20% it would be our undoing. It is not to eradicate legalese or Lawyer-speak or other Orwellian signs of social degeneration (such as Jane Jacobs pointed out in her last book, Dark Ages Ahead ) but to simply limit it to absolute necessity. I too would want to consult a lawyer if they were available to me; they have made themselves almost indispensable. I meant to say that all jargon probably had its roots in the practice of law and was mainly for show or intimidation or to confuse the issue rather than for any real need.

bud...
:l:

I agree on congress, and believe the entire system needs to be revamped. Not that it will, but it needs an enema in the worst way. However, you made one minor error in your assessment, Bud. They have not made themselves indispensible... we have. Personal reponsibility in this country has gone the way of the Edsel, and we're the worse for it. Everyone is looking for a payday. The reason I have an empty playground is because I had to take the equipment out for "safety" reasons. Was it unsafe? No... But it would never pass the legal test. So when poor Johnny falls down and breaks his arm, the City gets sued. Nevermind that Johnny can't balance on one foot without falling over, it's the S-hook on the swingset that had more than a 1/8" gap.

So, consider the jargon to be just like that S-hook. Have it off by just a little, and someone will misinterpret a meaning, purposely or not, and make a mess of things. Usually a very costly mess...

Sorry for the rant and the off-topic post... Oh hell, I'm not sorry, shoot me if you want, I don't care.
 

smarty

Cyburbian
Messages
88
Points
4
Disneyfication - the process of 'historic design review' in which you try to make everything new look very old and it looks very plastic and belongs in Walts World of Whackiness with the ducks that don't wear pants.............
 

hilldweller

Cyburbian
Messages
3,863
Points
23
RichmondJake said:
If I never hear the phrase “proportionate share mitigation” again I will be happy.
You have to remove that little chip in the back of your head that DCA put in :D
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,449
Points
55
from the random thread from kjelsadek, ready? this is great! ;):

level of douchery

is that measured on the Kelvin scale?
 
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