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Super Walmarts in Urban/Inner City Areas

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5,353
Points
31
I'm looking for information on Super Walmarts or other big box retailers that have located in urban/inner city areas. This information can be in the form of staff reports, TIA's, feasibility studies, pictures, personal testimonies, etc. Thanks in advance!
 
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5,353
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If they haven't, then New Orleans will be the very first to get a Super Walmart within its inner city.
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,884
Points
38
Try Rutland, VT

I know that Rutland, VT has a "downtown" Wal-Mart, but it's not a Super. It may be a start.
 

boiker

Cyburbian
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3,890
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26
East Peoria has a super wal-mart right across from the downtown Peoria. There is the Illinois River seperating the two towns.

I am extreamely opposed to super-walmarts in city/urban areas, it's like throwing an Ikea in there. it'll just generate a insane traffic problem, and de-densify a mass-transit orienated area. (as most inner city areas are)

opinions?
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
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10,624
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34
WalMart in "the core"

There is one going up right down the 'hood from me i Milwaukee. They tore down the City's first indoor shopping mall (which by rights was a good idea in itself), and they are replacing it with the Super Wal Mart and a variety of mom-n-pop stores. Neat thing is, it's ped-friendly and recreates the "downtown feel" even with the box!

article about it:

www.jsonline.com/bym/news/sep01/capitol21092001.asp

This is the firm that did the plan:

www.pdisite.com/
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Chicago started a program, "Retail Chicago," a few years back. They have had some good success attracting retail to all parts of the city, and are one of the best sources I can think of.
 

planasaurus

Cyburbian
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215
Points
9
I read a story in either the Chicago Tribune or Sun-times yesterday about a proposed wall mart in Chicago. The developers wanted several million dollars from the city to account for anticipated theft because it is being proposed in a low-income area.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,080
Points
34
Theft in Chicago? There are some people who would suggest the biggest source of theft in Chicago is the political system. At least that used to be true back in the machine days. I think things in Chicago have cleaned up. Now it is the State of Illinois which appears to be corrupt.
 

planasaurus

Cyburbian
Messages
215
Points
9
Yes, I think it is a quite insulting to demand money from the City on the assumption that there will be theft.
 

Mary

Member
Messages
127
Points
6
It's crazy to my way of thinking. They are the ones that want to put a store there and then they expect someone else to pay them money just in case they miscalculated so they wont have to risk loosing any. Their in business they can take the breaks like everyone else.
 

boiker

Cyburbian
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3,890
Points
26
Mary wrote:
It's crazy to my way of thinking. They are the ones that want to put a store there and then they expect someone else to pay them money just in case they miscalculated so they wont have to risk loosing any. Their in business they can take the breaks like everyone else.
didn't you pay attention to anything lately. All corporations need governement assistance. Enron made $200 million plus of taxes every year. They didn't pay a dime and took $200 million EXTRA from the government. Comparably, that means that i should have got ALL of my taxes back, PLUS about $1000 bucks.

Chicago seems smart with retailers, they denied an IKEA near the bucktown neighborhood because the amount of QOL issues and traffic problems it would generate outweighed its' return in taxes.
 

Mary

Member
Messages
127
Points
6
boiker

"didn't you pay attention to anything lately. All corporations need governement assistance. Enron made $200 million plus of taxes every year. They didn't pay a dime and took $200 million EXTRA from the government. Comparably, that means that i should have got ALL of my taxes back, PLUS about $1000 bucks."


What can I say I keep hoping that Capitalism has at least a little basis in reality.
 

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
5,401
Points
32
planasaurus wrote:
I read a story in either the Chicago Tribune or Sun-times yesterday about a proposed wall mart in Chicago. The developers wanted several million dollars from the city to account for anticipated theft because it is being proposed in a low-income area.

So, since we have a town of 10,000 and lower than average crime rate, they should pay us for what they don't lose? Sounds like fair logic to me, I may ask them that when they show up for their permit.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
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5,984
Points
29
Conservatives Against Corporate Welfare

This is another hot button of mine. In another thread we are talking about the loss of values. Corporations play one town against another. “If you give us this we may locate in your humble hamlet.” I would like to ban incentives nation-wide. Not very conservative...I know. Corporations should have to play by the rules I as a citizen have to obey – all of them. A large pork processor once flirted with a town I worked and lived in.

The locals couldn’t kiss enough hinney. When they were all discussing possible incentive packages I suggested we offer our wives and daughters for their carnal pleasure. We were offering everything else, why stop short. That would surely separate us from the other towns. Perhaps we could attract more jobs if we employed talented service personnel at the EcoDevo Office. For some reason I was not asked back to future meetings.
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,890
Points
26
yes.. and corps expect special treatment. What i was told by a vetern planner. If they really want to locate in your city, they'll do anything to make it a reality.

Usually most stores have invested so much money into demographics, growth trends, real estate, etc.. that they basically commit themselves to a location even before they talk to the city. I know this is how home depot operates. As an intern, i worked iwth a planner and we got them to use wrought iron around their store yard, add decoritive columns to the facade use multiple shades of color, reduce their sign size, etc.

for once, it seemed the corp jumped through hoops for us, and not the reverese.
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
30
elGuapo,
you weren't invited back because they had a picture of your daughter. the populus out here is up in arms because we don't have a (fill in a favorite store/restaurant) that our competing neighbor was able to land. problem is the neighbor doled out $600K in bribes (I'm sorry...incentives) to get it. economic development is total madness.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,984
Points
29
She's your daughter too...you heartless @^&^&*

Our little secret is out now. At least that's what you said when we went on Springer!
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
As an economic developer, I know how frustrating it is to work the incentives game. There are a couple nearby communities that I can talk to and we agree not to compete. Then again, there is one neighboring community, with no professional staff, only a committee of locals, who will approach companies in our cities with the "Free Land!" pitch. They are the only ones within at least fifty miles doing that. What complete idiots. Get a clue or get out of the game.
 
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SUper Walmarts in Urban Areas

The City of Dallas Plan Commission just defeated one that was planned in an urban neighborhood near Love Field (our inner city airport). It will now go to City Council. You might try the Dallas Morning News website to see if they have the story still. It was just last week.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
Re: WalMart in "the core"

bturk wrote:
There is one going up right down the 'hood from me i Milwaukee. They tore down the City's first indoor shopping mall (which by rights was a good idea in itself), and they are replacing it with the Super Wal Mart and a variety of mom-n-pop stores. Neat thing is, it's ped-friendly and recreates the "downtown feel" even with the box!

As much as I dislike Wal Mart, this project is needed in the area and I looks like something you would find in an upscale suburb, not the inner city.

I did find it funny that Milwaukee's mayor called the development patriotic. Does that mean that whenever a Plan Commisison denies big-box development that they are anti-American?
 
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UPDATE

When I first posted this message, the developers were preparing to submit the application for the Wal-Mart in addition to a myriad of other requests that I don't care to go into right now. The Commission staff worked long and strenuous hours to devise the best set of recommendations that we thought were possible given the circumstances. The Commission upheld the staff's recommendations much to the dismay of Wal-Mart, et. al. This issue split the community straight down socio-economic lines (read between the lines - black vs. white; rich vs. poor). The mayor appointed a so-called independent blue ribbon committee to make a recommendation to the City Council. They suggested ignoring the Commission's recommendation (as if they never existed). To make an extremely long story short, the City Council bent over and took it up the....by completely disregarding the Commission's recommendation and conceding to the developers.

Once the story about the Dallas Wal-Mart leaked across the state lines into New Orleans, everyone has been running around screaming "I told you so!!!" and so on and so forth. The CPC staff requested many of the same things that Wal-Mart offered to build in Dallas. They, Daphne Moore to be exact, stated before the entire city that a two-story Wal-Mart could not be built. The parking could not be reduced. A structured multi-level garage was not feasible....blah...blah....blah.

That was the last project I worked on before I left the CPC for the private sector and it was a HUGE learning experience for me.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Hee Hee, substitute a different national chain name, and I've got the same story (first half).

In the review stages we actully took the road trips (for the story sake we'll say to Dallas) to get the digital photos of their enhanced sites and used them to assert our point that a dryvit box wouldnt be accepted when they are using face brink in Dallas. The petitioner looked our Mayor square in the eyes - on TV - and said in snotty tone "Yeah, well it's not like you are Dallas" That statement was followed by "Motion to Deny" then "second" . It was a unanimous kick in the A$$ to the petitioner.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
Oh, I just love the "Well you're not _____" comment whenever you ask for something nicer.
 

dbarch

Cyburbian
Messages
52
Points
4
Target is planning a "Super Target" as part of a big-box complex, along with a Publix supermarket and a Lowe's home-improvement store in Atlanta. The site is at an urban edge along a railroad corridor. North of the railroad are several late-19th and early 20th century neighborhoods that have gentrified. South of the railroad is a mix of neighborhoods, mostly minority, which are gentrifying (and changing racial composition) rapidly.
The site is currently a mix of light industrial and warehouse uses, and I think the retailers want to get in before the land price goes out of sight.
Some of the gentrified neighbors want to fight the re-zoning, but many of the lower- and middle-class neighbors are desperate for retail that offers choice and doesn't require a car. Should be interesting to see what develops!
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
WalMart and Slave Labor

This is kind of off the subject, but here is an exerpt of something originally printed in the New York Times about Wal Mart forcing people to work for free after they had punched out.

Wal-Mart accused of labor violations
Workers claim pressure to work for no pay; firm says cases rare, forbidden
By STEVEN GREENHOUSE
New York Times
Last Updated: June 24, 2002
Kansas City, Mo. - After finishing her 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. shift, Verette Richardson clocked out and was heading to her car when a Wal-Mart manager ordered her to turn around and straighten up the store's apparel department.

Eager not to get on her boss' bad side, she said, she spent the next hour working unpaid, tidying racks of slacks and blouses and picking up hangers and clothes that had fallen to the floor. Other times after clocking out, she was ordered to round up shopping carts scattered in the parking lot.

"They wanted us to do a lot of work for no pay," said Richardson, who worked from 1995 to 2000 at a Wal-Mart in southeast Kansas City. "A company that makes billions of dollars doesn't have to do that."

But according to Richardson and 40 other current and former Wal-Mart workers who were interviewed over the last four months, Wal-Mart has done just that, forcing or pressuring employees to work hours that were not recorded or paid.

Federal and state laws bar employers from making their hourly employees work unpaid hours. Wal-Mart's internal policies forbid such work as well. But many current and former employees and managers said Wal-Mart's intense focus on cutting costs had created an unofficial policy that encouraged managers to request or require off-the-clock work and to avoid paying overtime.

Accusations like these are at the heart of a wide-ranging legal battle between Wal-Mart and employees or former employees in 23 states. These lawsuits contend that the company has cheated Wal-Mart employees and workers at its warehouse-store division, Sam's Club, out of hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

Wal-Mart officials insist that the off-the-clock phenomenon is minimal considering that the company has 3,250 stores and a million employees in the United States. The officials say the company, based in Bentonville, Ark., has a strong policy against such work that is spelled out in the handbook given to every worker.

"Off-the-clock work is an infrequent and isolated problem, which we correct whenever we become aware of it," said William Wertz, a Wal-Mart spokesman. "It is Wal-Mart's policy to pay its employees properly for the hours they work."

Wertz said managers who required or requested off-the-clock work were subject to disciplinary action, including dismissal.

Two years ago, Wal-Mart paid $50 million to settle a class-action lawsuit that asserted that 69,000 current and former Wal-Mart employees in Colorado had worked off the clock.

But legal papers and interviews with workers suggest that the off-the-clock problems go far beyond Colorado. In depositions and in interviews with The New York Times, Wal-Mart employees described some off-the-clock work:

Former employees at stores in California, Louisiana, New York, Ohio, Oregon and Washington said that many evenings when their stores closed, managers locked the front door and prevented workers from leaving - even those who had clocked out - until everyone finished straightening the store. Workers said these lock-ins, which aim to prevent theft, forced many employees to work an hour or two unpaid and enraged parents whose school-age children worked at Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart officials acknowledged that employees were sometimes locked in the stores but said the policy was to pay workers for every hour they were locked in.
Employees at stores in several states said managers ordered them to clock out after their eight-hour shifts and then continue working.
Some employees said they frequently took it upon themselves to clock out after their regular shift and then return to work, with their managers' knowledge and approval. These workers said they feared that if they did not finish their daily tasks before going home, they would be written up or fired.
A dozen Wal-Mart workers, including four in the payroll department, said managers deleted hours from employee timecards to avoid paying overtime. Wal-Mart officials said the company strictly forbid this practice and disciplined managers who did it.
Several current Wal-Mart employees said that despite the lawsuits, the problems continue.

Although company policy prohibits off-the-clock work, Wal-Mart has created a system of rewards and punishments that critics say gives managers strong incentives to demand such work.

Under one bedrock policy, described in a deposition by a senior payroll executive, store managers are ordered to keep payroll costs below a target that headquarters sets for every store.

Wal-Mart gives store managers another incentive to squeeze down labor costs by pegging their annual bonuses to the profits of their individual stores, a system rare among major retailers.

Wal-Mart officials played down the extent of unpaid work by saying that employees often came forward to complain only after calling toll-free numbers that lawyers had established.

But lawyers and union officials say that not only is the practice prevalent at Wal-Mart, but that the complaints against it are greater than at competitors.

To defend against such accusations, Wal-Mart officials have put forward dozens of employees who said they had never done off-the-clock work or been asked to do it.

Julie Rice, sales coordinator at a Sam's Club in Ohio, said in a deposition that she had been compensated for "every minute of work" she had done for Wal-Mart. Dianne Huston, a cashier in Ohio, testified that she was never asked to work off the clock and that she was "not allowed to do anything off the clock."

Retailing analysts, lawyers and Wal-Mart officials say it is hard to estimate the potential liability the company could face in all these cases. Wal-Mart's defenders estimate liability could run several million dollars, while plaintiffs' lawyers say the cost could reach several billion.

The official policy that Wal-Mart provides its store managers is clear: "It is a violation of the law and Company policy to work off the clock or for a Supervisor or Manager to request Associates work off the clock."

But eight former managers said headquarters set payroll and staffing levels so low it was nearly impossible to run stores properly unless some worked more than 40 hours a week.




Appeared in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on June 25, 2002.
 
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