Sweatshops, such as nike and gap

BKM

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#21
it seems silly to me to take people's land (or set up a system that redistributes their land) and then tell them they are unemployed and they need jobs. Give them their land/markets back and their won't be masses of rural (mexican) poor flooding to (US) cities in search of work because their system of land tenure was dismantled (under NAFTA).
You make some good points in your post, but from my admittedly shallow reading of Mexican history: 1. People have been moving to cities (and coming to the north) well before the destruction of the ejido system, and 2. the ejido system didn't work very well, anyway, at creating a life with any comforts or chance of advancement at all-large families tend to dilute the land base per person.

Of course, recent studies I've seen (God, I wish I'd kept the article/study/reference) about the impact of the maquiladora on Mexican economics has been pretty negative, overall. How that study's conclusions relate to the (growing?) middle class in Mexican cities like Guadalajara and Monterrey, I don't know.
 

jresta

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#22
The ejido system was flawed (it was a compromise that did not meet the demands put fwd. in the revolution) but it was something that could've been fixed . . . or at least improved.
You can't set up a communal system of anything and not include continuing education as part of it. Education on how the system is supposed to work as well as general education. If people understand that large families will cause the system to break down they can at least make the appropriate choices. (From what i hear the birthrate in mexico is starting to level off)

People from poorer places will always be attracted to wealthier places. I'm not denying that. It's one thing when the migration is voluntary and another entirely when it's forced. You also have to admit that since '92 a steady trickle has turned into a serious flood. It may not necessarily be the rural folk that are coming to the US directly but the fact that they are moving around within Mexico causes a ripple effect.

When you shift from a plantation economy to an industrial one a middle-class becomes necessary and mexico did a good job at creating one post 1917 but as you shift to a post-industrial economy that traditional middle class is not so necessary. So i wouldn't call these people in Monterrey a growing "middle-class" like you and i might consider ourselves middle-class. This is more like the definition of bourgeois - the owners of the means of production. Nouveau riche if you prefer. As far as Jose six-pack is concerned his numbers are shrinking just as they are here.

The mexican middle-class used to be strong - a result of everything won in the revolution but things were severely mismanaged (reminds of this other country . . .), debt skyrocketed and education and healthcare spending were cut to the bone (ringing any bells?). If you don't have a good school system you don't have a middle class (insert name of big american city here). Things started to fall apart in the 70's and leveled off in the 80's before getting worse again post '92. You're not going to find too many households anywhere in Mexico with purchasing power equivalent to $60k a year. There's a huge gap between $25k and less and $100k+. The people that have the entrepreneurial streak move here. The people with the education go to Spain. But the opportunities to clear out a MIDDLE class space for oneself in mexico are slim.
 

jresta

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#23
I was just thinking about that "middle-class"

The "real" middle class - that portion of households that straddle the 50% mark (10% on either side)- earn an average of $42k per year.

what most people mean when they say "middle class" seems to me to mean the 75%-95% bracket

95% earn less than $150k
75% earn less than $60k
50% earn less than $44k
25% bring in less than$22k

but that's just income - throw in assets and the whole thing gets skewed even more b/c plenty of us have negative wealth (myself included).
 

boiker

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#24
jresta said:

If labor was just as free to cross borders as capital there would be no sweatshops. The reason they are able to do what they do is because they have a captive audience.
i have reached a new level of enlightenment.
 

BKM

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#25
There was an interesting article in the New York Times??? this past weekend about the labor movement in Indonesia. It seems that post-Suharto, the violence and legal prohibitions against organized labor have weakened. However, the company owners are now, according to this article, firing their unionized workforce and/or moving the plants to China, where independent unions are still forbidden.

I don't like his PROscriptions. But, marx's DEscriptions seem more and more prescient.
 

jresta

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#26
BKM said:
There was an interesting article in the New York Times??? this past weekend about the labor movement in Indonesia. It seems that post-Suharto, the violence and legal prohibitions against organized labor have weakened. However, the company owners are now, according to this article, firing their unionized workforce and/or moving the plants to China, where independent unions are still forbidden.

I don't like his PROscriptions. But, marx's DEscriptions seem more and more prescient.
Hahaha - so much for "red" China. Unions outlawed for maximum profits!

Don't get me started on Suharto. Bush goes after some punk like Saddam for being a "brutal dictator" when Suharto easily killed 10x as many people as Saddam.

-> excellent book on the Globalization project from the Breton Woods Conference to the present. Development and Social Change: A Global Perspective by
Philip McMichael . . . he writes a lot of great stuff on the world economy.
 

The One

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#27
Battle Ready...

Jresta:

I agree about Indonesia, but, unless you and I (literal meaning) were to armor up :-c for one helluva jungle fight, we're not doing anything about it....oh, and Indonesia doesn't have as much oil.....ha ha ha..... :-D
 

The One

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#28
Earthy Clothing

DEVA Life wear (North Dakota Clothing Company) is what all planners should strive to adorn themselves with.....
 
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