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Tacos!!!!

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
646
Points
27
hard tacos are just an attempt to have an organized plate of nachos so just eat nachos
The only reason I ever thought hard taco shell = taco is that the Ortega kit was the only kind of tacos I ever had until my mid-20's. We didn't even have a taco bell nearby growing up.
 
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michaelskis

Cyburbian
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20,157
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51
I never had tacos growing up. At all. My introduction to them came in the freshman cafeteria in college.
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I grew up in what can accurately described as parts north of Canada... and Tacos were still a regular food in our home.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,575
Points
46
We had tacos at least once every couple of weeks. Yes, usually they were the crunchy Ortega or Old El Paso taco shells, but I enjoyed them then and still enjoy them now.

There was a very good authentic Mexican restaurant in the tiny little farm town near where I grew up. It was there in the '60s when my parents moved to the area and was in an old feed store that a Mexican immigrant family bought a few years before my parents moved out there. They started by just continuing the feed store, then began selling candy and homemade tacos and tamales from a counter in the back to the farmers (and their kids) who would come in each day. The food proved so popular that by the time my parents moved to the area, they had turned the place fully into a restaurant.

Growing up, that was always my favorite restaurant and would be what I would pick for going out to eat if it were up to me. My dad would like to order the menudo. I always thought it sounded disgusting but it was actually really good.

The same family ran it until about 7 or 8 years ago when some meth addict broke in one night, cut himself on something, and decided to burn the place down so the police couldn't use DNA evidence to track him down over the $40 he stole. :r: :mad: The police still caught the guy.

There was a huge outcry from the community trying to get the family to rebuild and reopen, but the matriarch who ran the place for decades had died a couple of years earlier, the kids were already old and were unsure if they'd want to continue for the long haul, and the grandkids didn't want to run a restaurant at all. So no more Poncho's. :(

I still have about $50 in gift certificates that I'll sadly never get to spend as my parents had gotten some for me for my birthday shortly before it burned down.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,396
Points
40
We had tacos and some bastardized Tex-Mex when I was growing up. My dad did his hitch in the air force in San Antonio and developed a taste for it. My mom, who was used to making a mix of German and American food, did her best. Let's just say the results were interesting at best.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
Points
30
We had tacos and some bastardized Tex-Mex when I was growing up. My dad did his hitch in the air force in San Antonio and developed a taste for it. My mom, who was used to making a mix of German and American food, did her best. Let's just say the results were interesting at best.
I had decent Mexican food in . . . Celle, Germany
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,644
Points
71
View attachment 48941

I grew up in what can accurately described as parts north of Canada... and Tacos were still a regular food in our home.
Never had tacos until I was a young adult about 19. I think I ate at a Mexican restaurant for the first time in San Francisco when I had them. I liked them immediately.

I recall one or two "mexican" chain restaurants (e.g. Taco John's, Mister Taco) opening up in the area in the 70's but if you asked the average resident in the area what salsa was in 1974 you'd likely have gotten a blank stare.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
Points
30
The family tried the old Ortega box taco kit for the first time in maybe 1970, 71, 72. I thought these are weird . . . . no, these are AWESOME
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,943
Points
51
I grew up in southern California (El Centro), and Phoenix. Tacos have always been a thing in my life. Tacos are awesome! Lengua isn't my thing, but I love baracoa and a good al pastor

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AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,154
Points
40
We have a pretty substantial Hispanic community here, so we actually have a few legit traditional taco places locally. There's one just down the road from one of the med bases that I'll be going to fairly regularly when I work over there. I prefer lengua tacos (beef tongue) to anything else. Chorizo and Al Pastor are my two other top ones. They have a pork skin one there too, but they don't cook the pork skin to order so it has a tendency to sit under a heat lamp and get real soggy after a while. It's still good, I would just prefer it to be crispy.

IMO, hard tacos are garbage and shouldn't exist.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,575
Points
46
I used to love to sit around and ask my dad when he had his first taco or pizza or bagel or other "ethnic" food. Growing up in the '30s and '40s the Detroit area was still pretty segregated by different ethnicities. The neighborhood he lived in was primarily German and Irish but he said the first Italian food and pizza he ever had was when an Italian family moved to their block and turned the front half of their house into a restaurant.

My dad was a soda jerk in the early '50s and he says the first Chinese food he had was when a family opened a laundry next to the pharmacy my dad worked at and the owner would come in and occasionally trade my dad the plate of food he had brought for lunch for an ice cream soda or a malt.

The Detroit area never really had a big Hispanic population (even now, it's still a relatively small minority) but he and his buddy would take the streetcar down to baseball games at Tiger Stadium (it was Briggs Stadium at the time) and they new a stop where they could get off and buy tamales and tacos and chiles from a vendor and still have enough money for tickets to the game. I'm sure my dad would say they left the house with $0.40 and that was enough to pay their streetcar fare, buy their food and tickets, and still have money to get home.

Keep in mind that my dad loves to make up stories so a lot of these may only be about 60% true.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,656
Points
32
The Detroit area never really had a big Hispanic population (even now, it's still a relatively small minority) but he and his buddy would take the streetcar down to baseball games at Tiger Stadium (it was Briggs Stadium at the time) and they new a stop where they could get off and buy tamales and tacos and chiles from a vendor and still have enough money for tickets to the game. I'm sure my dad would say they left the house with $0.40 and that was enough to pay their streetcar fare, buy their food and tickets, and still have money to get home.
My mom and dad say the same thing about SF giants games, and how they could go to the game, eat, and still have money left over with 2 bucks or something to that effect.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,157
Points
51
Did spicy steak tacos with onions, cilantro, and lime juice today for lunch. They were awesome.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,575
Points
46
I had a shrimp salad sandwich for lunch today. I had mine on a roll. Maybe I should have wrapped up that shrimp and mayo and Old Bay seasoning in a tortilla and called it a taco...
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
7,413
Points
33
I have tacos in some format at least once a week. You can make them in so many different ways with so much different content--that kind of perfect food delivery system. We've got several legit good holes-in-the-wall that were frequent flyers. I like every type of tortilla, crunchy or soft or puffy, etc. I'm a sucker for good, homemade corn tortillas. I can make my own, but I'm not terribly fast and it is harder with an electric stove (rather than gas). There's a great panaderia down the street that I'm hopelessly addicted to their conchas pan dulce, and they happen to make damn good flour and corn tortillas.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,924
Points
40
I'm out of sync. We had gyros tonight. But wait.... aren't gyros just Mediterranean tacos?

Based on the people picking up orders while I was there, my gyro hookup is doing more business as takeout only than they did as a full service restaurant. They had more employees working than I've ever seen before.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,439
Points
27
Since April, or so, I have been in the office once a week with my four staff each taking one of the remaining days. My lunch on my office day is always a local taco place. Never gets old.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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Moderator
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18,699
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69
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There’s Bitmoji for everything now.
 
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