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Tasty Local/Regional Foods

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What are some of the local/regional foods that you enjoy but it will take a certain amount of convincing for those not familiar with the cuisine to eat because of the name or orgin (ingredients)?

For example:

Boiled Crawfish - besides eating the tails, we also like to suck the heads ......all of the flavor is concentrated right there in the juice. Mmm mm good!

Raw oysters - best slammed down with hot sauce, horseradish and an ice cold beer!

Hogs Head Cheese - gelatinous substance, not really a cheese, but best with crackers.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
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3,904
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25
Planderella said:
Boiled Crawfish - besides eating the tails, we also like to suck the heads ......all of the flavor is concentrated right there in the juice. Mmm mm good!

Raw oysters - best slammed down with hot sauce, horseradish and an ice cold beer!
Both really good and are perfect with cold beer. :b: However, those oysters should be steamed, never raw... ;)

Being a somewhat new transplant to PA, I'm learning to like the Eastern European "Hunky" food they eat up here.
Halushki - egg noodles with cabbage and some kind of sauce.
Halupkies - cabbage leaves stuffed with seasoned beef or sausage
Perogies - big potato filled pasta. Boiled and smothered in buttter.

No wonder there's so many overweight people in this town.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
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2,549
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Wisconsin Favorites:

Around here we have "Cannibal Sandwiches" which are basically raw ground sirloin, onions, and pepper on a small piece of pumpernickel rye. You will find them at just about any Christmas party in the state.

Butter Burgers - Come on Mike D, you know you want one.

I don't like these, but they are also regional foods that people love:

Smelt - basically fried minnows. Yuck

Pickled Herring or Pickled Northern - come in a variety of sauces, none of which can mask the disgusting flavor of vinegar soaked fish.

Not from here, but from Canada...the frequest topic on Cyburbia...Poutine. Fries topped with gravy and cheese curds. Yum!
 

martini

Cyburbian
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678
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19
Lutevisk!~actually kinda good. I don't make a habit of eating it though...

Hotdish~ noodles, meat, tomato sauce, cheese. blaaaand!

Friday Fish fries for Wisconsin. Repo, how can you forget the fish fry???
 

Big Easy King

Cyburbian
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1,361
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23
boudoin (pronounced, "boo-dan") balls - combination of seasoned rice and boudoin sausage deep-fried that's enclosed in a ball-shaped, battered shell. Good!

dirty rice - a mixture of seasoned ground beef and rice. Very tasty!

blackened redfish - seasoning and spices added to redfish while on the grill to give it a "blackened" effect. Damn good!
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
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Scrapple .... everything they don't put in the hot dogs.
 

ilikefish0

Cyburbian
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204
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Planderella said:

Boiled Crawfish - besides eating the tails, we also like to suck the heads ......all of the flavor is concentrated right there in the juice. Mmm mm good!

Raw oysters - best slammed down with hot sauce, horseradish and an ice cold beer!

Hogs Head Cheese - gelatinous substance, not really a cheese, but best with crackers.
Now that I'm located in Arizona, I sudenly have this craving for seafood...
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,080
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34
Most of Wisconsin's signature foods, like beer, bratwurst, and kringles, don't require much persuasion. Cheese does come in many varieties, including some very pungent-smelling ones.* Wisconsin has the only cheese factory in the US that makes Limburger.


[OT]* Just like the Eskimo are said to have hundreds of names for snow, the French have hundreds of names of cheeses. Yet Mark Twain points out that the French have no word for "soap." Maybe that is why they like the strong cheeses.

Sorry, but I can't pass up an opportunity to take a shot at the French.[/OT]
 

SW MI Planner

Cyburbian
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3,194
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26
We've talked about these before, but PASTIES!

No, not these pasties....


*these* pasties.... a pastry filled meat and potato meal. Kind of like a pot pie without the sauce. They are all over the UP, and northern MI (and other upper midwest places, I'm sure). Chad and I make our own, and that is actually what we are having for dinner tonight.

 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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18,313
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44
Cardinal said:
Wisconsin has the only cheese factory in the US that makes Limburger.
Thanks for being the only one.

Big up here: BBQ buffalo.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
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2,449
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25
A New Zealand specialty is the hangi, which is a traditional Maori method of cooking meat and veges (such as beef, kumara, potato) over warmed stones set in the ground. I've only tried it once I think but it was pretty good.

SW MI, we have pasties here. Yummy! A local bakery does a great bacon and mushroom variety.
 
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Plannerbabs

Cyburbian
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1,037
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23
No one does a pork tenderloin like a Hoosier. They should be about 1/3" thick, breaded or grilled (breaded is traditional), about the size of a dinner plate, and served on a hamburger bun, preferably egg.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,852
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I am sure that Central FL has many tasty seafood specialties (seeing as how we're almost on the east coast), but since I don't eat seafood in any way, shape or form...

Hmmm.... we have fresh orange juice all over the place.

Disney World has those huge smoked turkey legs I see so many tourists devouring. Does that count?
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
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4,853
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26
Hum.. Chilean foods are quite diverse.. in a more regional perspective, we've got the delicious cousine from Chiloé and bits from the mapuche cousine too.. Also the german cousine brought by the german inmigrants in the mid/late 1800s is wonderful...

One tasty "dish" from Chiloé is the 'Curanto', that's cooked in a hole in the ground, and is mostly seafood. It's steam cooked in a hole, and there is also the modern variant called 'Pulmay' and it is prepared in any common cooking pot.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
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2,449
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25
SkeLeton said:

One tasty "dish" from Chiloé is the 'Curanto', that's cooked in a hole in the ground, and is mostly seafood. It's steam cooked in a hole
Sounds very similar to our hangi! Which can have seafood, and is cooked in the ground by steaming/smoking.

One of the places I lived in for a few years is called Paraparaumu, which means used/dirty (parapara) earth ovens (umu).
 

steveanne

Member
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176
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7
Rochester, NY has it's Garbage Plates (mmmmm, grease), meat hot sauce (used just like regular hot sauce, except with meat), and Zweigle's hot dogs (the best hot dogs I've ever had - encased in skin!) Famous beers of the area ---> Genny, Genny Light, JW Dundee's Honey Brown Lager, and Michael Shea's. All brewed in downtown Rochester.

Chicago has it's deep dish pizzas, italian beef, and tamales.

Orlando.... Well, Like Zoning Goddess said... Disney has those turkey legs. And I swear they are not emu. What about churros? Those are pretty famous in Orlando, too.
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
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3,241
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27
I can't think of much food local to Arizona, but I can tell you the prickly pear margaritas are the best!

I second the raw oysters in NOLA, they were so big! I swear though, ACME had better oysters than the guy around the corner- theirs were the size of half dollars and Acme's were nearly the size of my palm.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,080
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34
Habanero said:
I can't think of much food local to Arizona, but I can tell you the prickly pear margaritas are the best!
Fry bread and Navajo tacos.
 

Kathie_WE

Cyburbian
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34
Points
2
MMM.. Local specialties are my favorite kind of foods... Here are some of my favorites from a few of the places I've lived --

From my hometown region -- White Hots (preferably either Hoffman's or Zweigel's), Salt Potatoes, & Grandma Brown's Baked Beans. White Hots are hot dogs made of pork & veal -- the best! Hoffman's are very skinny and the best Syracuse has to offer. Zweigel's are short, fat, & are the best of Rochester's hot dogs. Salt Potatoes are new (very small) potatoes boiled in lots of salt -- usually served with butter unless you are in my house. Grandma Brown's are not your common baked beans. They have a thick sweet gooey syrup & are best served hot out of the oven with bacon. YUM YUM!!!!

From South Central PA -- Love the PA Dutch cooks -- some of my favorites Chow Chow, Pepper Slaw, Sweet Bologna, Chicken Pot Pie, & Chicken Corn Chowder. Chow Chow is pickled summer vegys. Pepper Slaw is cabage & caraway in a brine. Sweet Bologna is a sweet deli sausage. Chicken Pot Pie is kinda like a chicken stew with large pieces of noodle in a thick broth. Chicken Corn Chowder is Chicken Soup kicked up with corn & a thick broth.

From MD -- Blue Crabs -- of course. Unfortunately they have been over harvested & are hard to come by.

Edit note -- Of course you can get blue crabs just about anywhere here -- but most are from the Carolinas, Texas, or Louisiana not the Chesapeake Bay.
 
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3,690
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Kathie beat me to the White Hots. Steveanne forgot Beef on Weck - roast beef served on salty Kimmelweck rolls.

We pick up Webers mustard when we visit Buffalo - best horseradish mustard ever.

And you cannot beat Fish Fry Fridays!!! Especially Beer Battered Haddock Fillets. You'll typically wait at least 45 minutes to get in the door at any fish fry joint on a Lenten Friday.

My favorite Wisconsin local delicacy was deep fried cheese curds. In my prego horomone altered state, I actually had a dream about them last week. sigh.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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7,915
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36
I think someone already mentioned Poutine....Mmmmmmmm....

Maple Baked Beans

Tourtiere (ground veal and pork pie)

Donuts!!!!!
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
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3,838
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25
Rhode Island

Dynamites (spicier sloppy joes), coffee milk, frozen lemonade, quohaugs (type of clams native to Narragansett Bay) lots of seafood and italian food, and like our Canadian friends - lots and lots of donuts.

Coffee ice cream used to be a local thing but now everyone has it.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
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SW MI Planner said:
We've talked about these before, but PASTIES! QUOTE]

Interesting. I thought pasties were a Montana thing - brought over by Cornish miners working in the Butte mines. Regardless, I like them.

Montana has little regional foods. We eat pretty much what everyone eats. Our only diversion from the norm would be Indian fry bread, Indian tacos and Rocky Mountain oysters.
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
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19
Seabishop said:
Rhode Island

Dynamites (spicier sloppy joes), coffee milk, frozen lemonade, quohaugs (type of clams native to Narragansett Bay) lots of seafood and italian food, and like our Canadian friends - lots and lots of donuts.

Coffee ice cream used to be a local thing but now everyone has it.
Seabishop - how about chowder with clear broth (never had it anywhere but RI) and french fries with malt vinegar and salt (ditto). These seem pretty unique to RI, in my experience...
 

Seabishop

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El Feo said:
Seabishop - how about chowder with clear broth (never had it anywhere but RI) and french fries with malt vinegar and salt (ditto). These seem pretty unique to RI, in my experience...
Yeah, those too. I thought everyone used vinegar on fries. :-$ We've also got weird terms for things like "grinders" for subs, and "cabinets" for milkshakes. "Hero" is never used here.
 

Howard Roark

Cyburbian
Messages
276
Points
10
In St. Louis –

St. Louis style pizza - razor thin, with “provel” cheese – a combination of provolone and swiss. Most people who are migrants to the area gag on it. But, it was the thing I missed most when I left the area.

Toasted ravioli and cannelloni - invented on the Hill, but I have seen it on menus outside the metro, usually served w/ a marinara sauce.

Brain sandwiches – hard to find even around here now, for obvious reasons, use to be a staple in southside taverns

Raw Hack – basically the German working mans version of steak tar-tar, once again a fast disappearing tavern staple

The Slinger – 2 hamburger patties covered in cheese, w/ 2 eggs served any style on top, then covered in Chili, raw onions and Parmesan cheese – best served at 3:00 am at the Eat-Rite diner on 7 and Chouteau after a few beers. God help you the next day.

Gooey Butter Cake – pretty much is what it sounds like, so rich that you can’t eat that much of it, consistency is somewhere between cake and pudding, served w/ powdered sugar on top.

Ted Drewes frozen custard, I know a lot of places have frozen custard, but I have not seen anything like Ted Drewes

Those are the things that seem exclusive to STL. There are a few others that seems like you should be able to find elsewhere, pork steaks, salcicita sausage (SP) bratwurst wrapped in a pretzel, etc…
 

jmf

Cyburbian
Messages
594
Points
17
Donairs - hard to find the same thing elsewhere these are not the same as gyros - meat in a pita with onion, lettuce, tomato and a sweet evaporated milk based sauce - especially good at 3 am

Lots of fish and lobster things - chowder; fish and chips...

Some acadian foods
- rappie pie (grated potato, starch removed, baked with chicken stock and beef, chicken, pork and sometimes clams)
- tortiere - meat pie
- fricot - a thick chicken soup

Boiled (Jiggs) dinner - Corned beef and cabbage
 

biscuit

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25
Seabishop said:
Yeah, those too. I thought everyone used vinegar on fries. :-$
They do here in Western PA. I quess because fries come on everything you order in resturaunts in the region...sandwiches, salads, everything.
 

Wannaplan?

Bounty Hunter
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3,212
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29
SW MI Planner said:
We've talked about these before, but PASTIES!

Ummm, yummy! Ever been to Albie's in Grayling? I know, there are better pasties elswhere, but if there was a pasty fast food joint in our hometown, well, they might just make a killing from me!
 

steveanne

Member
Messages
176
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7
Downtown said:
Kathie beat me to the White Hots. Steveanne forgot Beef on Weck - roast beef served on salty Kimmelweck rolls.
I can't believe I didn't mention Rochester's own "white hots". I know folks from Florida who smuggle them back down into the state and sell them to friends.

And Beef on Weck. Totally Buffalo. I freaking love Anderson's Roast Beef and I need to go there every time I am in the Buffalo Area.

I can't believe I forgot about salt potatoes too. I thought that was just a normal thing everywhere. I get so mad when it is barbeque time and there are no salt potatoes to be had.

And while I'm at it, I think Wegmans should invade the Chicago area. I want my WPOP. And I really hate Dominicks (sorry Dominicks).
 

H

Cyburbian
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2,850
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24
Here in Miami, I don’t know even where to begin. The food here is insanely good. I guess the most “popular” local treat is the Cuban sandwich, but I enjoy the fresh exotic locally grown fruits like papaya, mangos, and limes. I am a newbie smoothie addict (but only with fresh fruits at a stand, I don’t want any filler like ice cream, yogurt, or even ice in there, and heaven forbid if a place uses ‘concentrate’, yuck). I am becoming very spoiled here, food wise.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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25,770
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61
Old Kentucky Hot Brown -
Smoked turkey and sugar-cured Virginia baked ham, on toast points, smothered in Mornay sauce and melted cheddar cheese and topped with crisp bacon and tomato.

Bugoo - a soup made from mutton, chicken, and a variety of vegetables. cooked a long time.

Brain Sandwiches - 'nough said.
 

tsc

Cyburbian
Messages
1,905
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23
I was just thinking about dinner....

Long Island Clam Chowder... a scoop of Manhattan mixed with a scoop of New England

Utica,,, Pusties... sound disgusting... but is a tasty italian creme filled pastry

Binghamton, Speidies... basically Soulvaki only served on Italian Bread.

Westchester..... wedges are not pizza... but sandwiches. Pizza is a slice.

Ithaca... Boburgers.... fried egg on burger

Love Rochesters Sal's Birdland Sauce... a mustardy orange spicy sauce served on BBQ Chicken.

NYC... White Castle burgers. and best thin pizza and bagels on earth and... home to the Fried Twinkie from the best fish and chip place... The Chip Shop in Brooklyn (of course malt vinegar for the chips!!)
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
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39
Seabishop said:
Rhode Island
Coffee ice cream used to be a local thing but now everyone has it.
I'm from FL and I've been eating coffee ice cream since I was very young. It can be the BEST, made correctly (store brands like Breyers suck). Mmmmm... Howard Johnson's was so good, so "coffee-like", served in those heavy, chilled silver dishes. Ooooh, and over a brownie, with hot fudge on top.....

Excuse me, I need to take a moment to compose myself...
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,970
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30
My favourite regional food is pickled pears with french fries. Developed a taste for this in Belgium. Good pickled pears are hard to find.

Repo mentioned smelt, it is really big here especially in February.

Then there are plain sugar donuts people here will go on and on about, even Tim's.
 

Kathie_WE

Cyburbian
Messages
34
Points
2
steveanne said:
I can't believe I didn't mention Rochester's own "white hots". I know folks from Florida who smuggle them back down into the state and sell them to friends.
My mom knows when she comes to Baltimore if there are no white hots, salt potatoes, and g'ma browns then she needs to find another place to stay. After all I am a starving grad student.....
 

Cirrus

Cyburbian
Messages
303
Points
11
In Colorado we have Rocky Mountain Oysters... But I won't say what they are. The whole point is to dupe unsuspecting outsiders in to eating them.

... They're a freshwater thing... From mountain streams... Yeah... We'll go with that. :)
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,080
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34
Cirrus said:
In Colorado we have Rocky Mountain Oysters... But I won't say what they are. The whole point is to dupe unsuspecting outsiders in to eating them.

... They're a freshwater thing... From mountain streams... Yeah... We'll go with that. :)
Bull.
 

BiteMeElmo

Cyburbian
Messages
324
Points
11
Cirrus said:
In Colorado we have Rocky Mountain Oysters... But I won't say what they are. The whole point is to dupe unsuspecting outsiders in to eating them.

... They're a freshwater thing... From mountain streams... Yeah... We'll go with that. :)
Around here we have similar things...prairie oysters.

Other regional yummy stuff:

Donairs (If you're ever in Edmonton, go to Queen Donair on 156 St....you won't be disappointed)

Poutine - ubiquitous Canuck heart-stopper

Bannock - flatbread-type stuff that you can eat with just about any topping. Jam is delish on it when it's still warm.
 

steveanne

Member
Messages
176
Points
7
Not only is this post making me hungry, but also homesick. I saw a Sal's Birdland mention. Boy is that stuff ever good.

Anybody else here a Nick Tahoe fanatic too? Schallers? Abbotts Ice Cream? Bill Gray's?

They make some good vittles up in Rochester, NY.
 

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
Points
22
Here in Central Illinois, we have a concoction called a "Horseshoe" This consists of a single slice of bread topped open faced with your choice of ham, turkey or hamburger, followed by a layer of french fries and smothered with melted cheese. I have never seen these anywhere else. Actually, the hamburger one is not bad.

Gotta put a plug in for the pasties at the Red Rooster Cafe in Mineral Point, Wisconsin, which had one of the largest concentrations of Cornish immigrants in America. You also gotta try the Cornish Saffron Cake.

I sure wish we had a Culver's. I want butterburgers!
 

noottamevas

Cyburbian
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2,095
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22
The ethnic foods thread got me wondering about regional foods. I'll be darned if it hadn't been talked about before.

DecaturHawk said:
Here in Central Illinois, we have a concoction called a "Horseshoe" This consists of a single slice of bread topped open faced with your choice of ham, turkey or hamburger, followed by a layer of french fries and smothered with melted cheese. I have never seen these anywhere else. Actually, the hamburger one is not bad.
It was the horseshoe I was wondering about. Is this available anywhere but Central Illionois? DH describes what we call the lesser "Ponyshoe". Horseshoe's are twice this amount. A good addition to the horsehoe is to top it with chili. Talk about heart attack on a plate;-)

Also, are biscuits and gravy widely available? Every breakfast restaurant has them around here, but they seem hit and miss in other places.
 

Jaxspra

Cyburbian
Messages
3,516
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24
Howard Roark said:
In St. Louis –

St. Louis style pizza - razor thin, with “provel” cheese – a combination of provolone and swiss. Most people who are migrants to the area gag on it. But, it was the thing I missed most when I left the area.

Toasted ravioli and cannelloni - invented on the Hill, but I have seen it on menus outside the metro, usually served w/ a marinara sauce.

Brain sandwiches – hard to find even around here now, for obvious reasons, use to be a staple in southside taverns

Raw Hack – basically the German working mans version of steak tar-tar, once again a fast disappearing tavern staple

The Slinger – 2 hamburger patties covered in cheese, w/ 2 eggs served any style on top, then covered in Chili, raw onions and Parmesan cheese – best served at 3:00 am at the Eat-Rite diner on 7 and Chouteau after a few beers. God help you the next day.

Gooey Butter Cake – pretty much is what it sounds like, so rich that you can’t eat that much of it, consistency is somewhere between cake and pudding, served w/ powdered sugar on top.

Ted Drewes frozen custard, I know a lot of places have frozen custard, but I have not seen anything like Ted Drewes

Those are the things that seem exclusive to STL. There are a few others that seems like you should be able to find elsewhere, pork steaks, salcicita sausage (SP) bratwurst wrapped in a pretzel, etc…
AAAAHHHH Slingers!! My FAVORITE...try as I may, they never taste as good when I make them as they do when visiting Curtousy Diner around 3 in the morn!!

One other that may not be only in STL but aren't all THAT common is White Castles...and I didn't know that about Gooey Butter Cake, I thought it was everywhere :-$
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
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6,241
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27
Detroit has Coney Island Hot Dogs that are different than the ones sold in New York. These are Kosher Dogs, steamed buns, chili, onions, and mustard.

Vernor's Ginger Ale and Faygo Red Pop are considered staples here along with Coke and Pepsi.
 

jmello

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2,583
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22
Seabishop said:
Rhode Island...Coffee ice cream used to be a local thing but now everyone has it.
You mean coffee milk (made at home with Autocrat syrup). Not a true Ocean Stater, huh? In elementary, middle and high school we had coffee, chocolate and plain milk. My aunt in Florida grabs a bottle of coffee syrup everytime she's up here.

Other Rhode Island specialities:

New York System Wieners (not really from NY): steamed wiener, chopped onions, spiced meat sauce, steamed bun

Del's Frozen Lemonade: lemonade sluch with pieces of lemon rind served from roadside trucks and trailers on the way to and from the beach

Stuffies: Quahogs (very big littlenecks) stuffed with bread, onions, peppers, spices and the secret Portuguese chorico.

Rhode Island Style Calamari: battered and fried squid rings and tentacles tossed with butter, black olives and sliced cherry or banana peppers (spicy).

Real Italian Grinders: (in order) mortadella, capicola, salami, peperoni, sliced tomatoes, pickles, sliced onions, peperoncinis, lettuce, topped with provolone cheese and TOASTED open-faced in the oven. NO where else have I had them made the same way, NO WHERE! Not Philly, not Boston, not Florida, not New York, no where.

Edit: I forgot the Real Clam Bake: steamers, lobsters, corn, new potatoes, cod, and chorico cooked on hot rocks in a pit on the beach covered with seaweed. An open fire is used to heat the rocks first and the moisture in the seaweed steams the food.
 

Floridays

Cyburbian
Messages
769
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21
South Florida has become such a melting pot -- influx of people from Cuba & Carribean islands, and from the Northeast/New York.

Cuban food: V. popular here. Usually consists of grilled or breaded meat served with rice and black beans, plantains.

"Island Food" -- curried goat, ox tails (there is an Oxtail's Depot around here)

The Keys food: key lime pie, mango salsa, conch fritters (YUM!)

Seafood: lots of dolphin (not Flipper), grouper & stone crab claws (in season).

Italian: awesome Italian grocery stores and restaurants.

Jewish: the large Jewish population means lots of Jewish delis (knish, etc). Oy vey!

The BBQ is OK here and the Mexican is so-so.
 

cololi

Cyburbian
Messages
1,185
Points
22
In Utah, we have Jello, with your favorite vegetable. Absolutely disgusting.

Mormon Potatoes: diced potatoes cooked caserole style with cream of chicken soup, cheddar cheese, and corn flakes on top. Actually pretty good if you can find someone who doesn't use condensed campbells soup.
 
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