NEVERENDING ♾️ Teh NEVERENDING Google Earth Planner Olympiad

Maister

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Have you always wanted to be an Olympic competitor, but lacked the skill, fitness, coordination, and dedication required to be a champion? Fear not, for this type of Olympic games relies on knowledge (and more than a little luck). Points will be awarded for finding the BEST examples on Google Earth of various phenomenon. The first event in the Olympiad will be .....

1. - find a location on earth which best exemplifies the concept of a woonerf

Copy and paste a link in your response. On your marks....get set....GO!!
 

luckless pedestrian

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This is so funny as I was just commenting earlier in Facebook on a friend who lives in Maastricht about her photos of this new resort town she visited today.

Here is the website for the developer - slightly antiseptic but she said it was nice - she went there because it was open space when she was a kid so she wanted to go see it
 

Maister

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This is so funny as I was just commenting earlier in Facebook on a friend who lives in Maastricht about her photos of this new resort town she visited today.

Here is the website for the developer - slightly antiseptic but she said it was nice - she went there because it was open space when she was a kid so she wanted to go see it
Judging panel awards.....9.5
 

dandy_warhol

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HTB1Mgv_RVXXXXahXpXXxh4dFXXXt.jpeg
 

Maister

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Planit

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Okay, this one truly conveys shared space and importantly has barriers..... 9.8. This one gets the gold. Now's your turn to issue a challenge.

Not so fast - there are barriers that separate the vehicular and pedestrian areas. A true woonerf "include shared space, traffic calming, and low speed limits. Under Article 44 of the Dutch traffic code, motorised traffic in a woonerf or "recreation area" is restricted to walking pace" as described in Wikipedia.

Also...The entire locality of Emmen in the Netherlands was designed as a woonerf in the 1970s.
 

Maister

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Not so fast - there are barriers that separate the vehicular and pedestrian areas. A true woonerf "include shared space, traffic calming, and low speed limits. Under Article 44 of the Dutch traffic code, motorised traffic in a woonerf or "recreation area" is restricted to walking pace" as described in Wikipedia.

Also...The entire locality of Emmen in the Netherlands was designed as a woonerf in the 1970s.
Okay, you convinced me. You win. You get to pick the next challenge.
 

Dan

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Is it too late to play?

A woonerfed main drag:

And just down the street:
 

Maister

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Most hovercrafts are military. All the good ones I know are in places like Camp Pendleton, and of course google earth doesn't usually have views of military bases available.
 

JNA

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The Isle of Wight Hovercraft is the last remaining commercial hovercraft service in the world.

The opposite end of the Hoverport

And the Museum
 

Planit

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The opposite end of the Hoverport


Good job! You receive a bonus points for the hovercraft actually landing in the hoverport.

You get to pick the next challenge...go.
 

Maister

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Is it too late to play?

A woonerfed main drag:

And just down the street:
Wow, the Icelanders seem to get it even more than the Dutch if that's possible. .
IOC rule change: one no longer needs to 'win' a competition to post a challenge. Anyone can at any time!
 

Maister

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Next challenge.....find us the most obvious adaptive re-use possible. Go!
 

jsk1983

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I'm not sure it was its original use very long, have not memory of it there going back 30 years...
 

Maister

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Check it out, condos! What could it have been previously...a fire station? Tool and die factory? Restaurant? Who can say!
 

Maister

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Here's a new challenge. Find the most American-looking place in Europe. Ugly suburban commercial strips in Austria, France, Germany, and Eastern Europe don't count. Bonus points if it's not a suburb of Reykjavik.
Ah, gay old Paree ....just like in 'Murica
Okay, that's cheating I confess. Let's see if I can come up with something more authentic...

Here we go - Sweden
vs the Yoopee

What's that? "built environment?" You didn't specify. Alright, I'll give it one more go.

EDIT: Holy carp this is difficult! I know this much - you won't find it randomly. There's plenty of crappy commercial and industrial areas that could maybe pass, but so far as residential goes, I got nothin so far!
 
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Dan

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EDIT: Holy carp this is difficult! I know this much - you won't find it randomly. There's plenty of crappy commercial and industrial areas that could maybe pass, but so far as residential goes, I got nothin so far!
Residential is going to be a challenge, because you're going to have to find the right combination of the following.

* Detached single family housing - not too difficult to find. The trick to looking really American is (1) frame construction, and/or (2) a neutral style that wouldn't seem too jarring if it was plopped into a Midwestern or Northeastern suburb. Frame ranch houses are fairly easy to find in Norway. Many single family houses in Iceland, or at least those that aren't too contemporary, could easily fit into an American context, even with their concrete construction. A brick house in a UK suburb might fit, but the small windows that many have would still mark them as foreign.

* Building setting - front yards open to the public realm, without fences, walls, gates, or shrubbery borders enclosing them. Uncommon outside of Belgium, Denmark, and Iceland.

* Building setback - 25' / 8m from the right-of-way. Good luck.

* Sidewalks with tree lawns - surprisingly rare. There's some in Denmark and Belgium. Otherwise, most residential streets will have either sidewalks adjacent to the roadway, often with cars parked on them (common in France), or no sidewalks period.

* Roadway - curbs or concrete gutter, not too rustic (e.g. rural-like cross-sections in suburban areas in Sweden, Norway, and Finland), not too polished (e.g, streets surfaced in paver blocks in the Netherlands). Right-of-way widths between 45' and 60' (14 - 18 meters) could be a challenge.

* Lack of weird Eurostuff - light poles with hat-like reflectors on the top, front of the house is oriented to the side yard, bollards, something like this, etc.

I say "bonus if it's not in Iceland" because a lot of that country's suburban development, even though it follow Danish suburban design principles, could seem almost Southwestern-ish at first glance.

As a stretch, this could be an alley somewhere in the US.
 

Maister

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Residential is going to be a challenge, because you're going to have to find the right combination of the following.

* Detached single family housing - not too difficult to find. The trick to looking really American is (1) frame construction, and/or (2) a neutral style that wouldn't seem too jarring if it was plopped into a Midwestern or Northeastern suburb. Frame ranch houses are fairly easy to find in Norway. Many single family houses in Iceland, or at least those that aren't too contemporary, could easily fit into an American context, even with their concrete construction. A brick house in a UK suburb might fit, but the small windows that many have would still mark them as foreign.

* Building setting - front yards open to the public realm, without fences, walls, gates, or shrubbery borders enclosing them. Uncommon outside of Belgium, Denmark, and Iceland.

* Building setback - 25' / 8m from the right-of-way. Good luck.

* Sidewalks with tree lawns - surprisingly rare. There's some in Denmark and Belgium. Otherwise, most residential streets will have either sidewalks adjacent to the roadway, often with cars parked on them (common in France), or no sidewalks period.

* Roadway - curbs or concrete gutter, not too rustic (e.g. rural-like cross-sections in suburban areas in Sweden, Norway, and Finland), not too polished (e.g, streets surfaced in paver blocks in the Netherlands). Right-of-way widths between 45' and 60' (14 - 18 meters) could be a challenge.

* Lack of weird Eurostuff - light poles with hat-like reflectors on the top, front of the house is oriented to the side yard, bollards, something like this, etc.

I say "bonus if it's not in Iceland" because a lot of that country's suburban development, even though it follow Danish suburban design principles, could seem almost Southwestern-ish at first glance.

As a stretch, this could be an alley somewhere in the US.
The problem with folks like us that have spent decades of our lives directing pattern recognition skills towards the built environment, is that there's always going to be some little 'tell' - some niggling detail - that causes dissonance in its context.
 
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Dan

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The problem with folks like us that have spent decades of our lives directing pattern recognition skills towards the built environment, is that there's always going to be some little 'tell' - some niggling detail - that causes dissonance in its context.
That's true. There's even little tells that are a giveaway for conventional suburban development in Canada versus the US, even when you don't look at flags or license plates. The lines really get blurry with some TND projects, or much of the Vancouver and Victoria areas, compared to the Seattle and Portland metros. The bulk of conventional suburban development around here has more in common with the far western off-island Anglophone suburbs of Montreal than with suburban Buffalo.

But even in Norway ...

A view like this could be something out of Colorado. This, on the other hand ...

In my Googledriving experience, parts of suburban Brussels and Copenhagen come as close to the American R-1 zoning landscape as I’ve found. Suburban Oslo can be kind of Pittsburgh-ish in areas.
 
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