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Tell Me About Your God

Tell me about your God

  • God is loving

    Votes: 16 31.4%
  • God is vengeful

    Votes: 1 2.0%
  • "God" who? I'm an atheist

    Votes: 12 23.5%
  • Let me tell you more below...

    Votes: 7 13.7%
  • Agnostic

    Votes: 15 29.4%

  • Total voters
    51

pete-rock

Cyburbian
Messages
1,547
Points
24
Re: Re: My two cents

Alan said:
...if one were to extend this logic to other sections of the Bible, then what does "Thou Shalt Not Kill" mean? What about not coveting your neighbor's wife? What about worshipping graven images? What about that whole resurrection thing? Did that really happen, or is the Word of God really that vague?

I mean, if God didn't really rest for one day after six days of work, then did Jesus really die on the cross?

This is long, and a little scholarly and academic. Please bear with me.

I recently read a book for my book club on this very topic. It is called "The History of God" by Karen Armstrong. The author is a former nun from England who left the Catholic Church but became a religious scholar. The book provides the historical basis for the growth of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and how their histories influence their practice now.

In reading this book I found that there were many Biblical scholars who questioned the happenings in the Scripture, going back 1700 years. There were many scholars and philosophers, trained in the Platonic Greek tradition, who found fault in the Bible.

For example, the book points out that there is scholarly research that suggests that the divinity of Jesus was not even accepted by Christian followers until some 400 years after his death. There was a lot of disagreement regarding the Bible's claims (not Jesus' claims, since it was already known at that time that much of what Jesus "said" in the Bible could not be attributed to Him) that Jesus was the Son of God and had been risen from the dead. The Council of Nicaea was convened by Eastern Roman Emperor Constantine in 325 AD to address those issues. It was at that time that the bishops at the Council developed the Apostle's Creed, the first statement of beliefs in the Christian faith (I believe in God the Father Almighty, Maker of Heaven and Earth...). It was at this Council that the doctrines of Jesus being risen from the dead, the Trinity (Father, Son and Holy Spirit) and others came to be.

Even after the Council of Nicaea, other Biblical scholars tried to reconcile what the Church said against the evidence. St. Augustine, for example, reconciled the Trinity as three human qualities -- memory, understanding and will.

My own personal belief is that Jesus is an historical figure, whose life was very much akin to Martin Luther King, Jr.:

- They were both young prodigies;
- They both became religious activists;
- They both came from oppressed groups;
- They saw religion as the vehicle for bringing their people out of oppression;
- They both had devoted followers who sought to keep their memories alive long after their deaths;
- They both united their respective peoples and spurred them to action;
- They were both persecuted by the government; and
- They both met tragic early deaths.

I believe everything else we know about Jesus -- the healings, the claims of direct divinity, the Resurrection -- were written by St. Paul and others some 50 years after Jesus' death (when most of the New Testament was written), principally to gain followers and keep the "movement" going among the tribal peoples in Greece, Turkey, Palestine and Syria.

I believe this, and still firmly believe in the existence of God.
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,165
Points
30
Duke Of Dystopia said:
Heathen- Closley associated with todays reconstructionist multi diety faith of the Germanic or Scandanavian pre-christian beliefs. This group self identifies itself specificly as "heathen" as a subset of pagan. NEVER to be closely associated as or with wicans. Actual practitioners call themselves internaly "Asatruer" or something close to that.


Pagan- Associated with worship of non-middle eastern origin faiths and worshiping multiple(s) of dieties. Many subsets thereof....

Sorry pagans! :)

Main Entry: 1hea·then
Pronunciation: 'hE-[th]&n
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English hethen, from Old English h[AE]then; akin to Old High German heidan heathen, and probably to Old English h[AE]th heath
Date: before 12th century
1 : of or relating to heathens , their religions, or their customs
2 : STRANGE, UNCIVILIZED

I was referring to definition #2...
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,699
Points
24
Mastiff said:
....akin to Old High German heidan heathen, and probably to Old English h[AE]th heath
Date: before 12th century
1 : of or relating to heathens , their religions, or their customs
2 : STRANGE, UNCIVILIZED

I was referring to definition #2...

JesseJ won't come out to play unfortunatly! :)

I think she is a Pagan but not a Heathen by the way she reacted :)

I was refering to #1 and the prelude of its Germanic origins.

Pagans tend not to understand Heathens because they are new age in general. Politicaly they tend to far left wing of the democratic party. Only 150 years old or so.

Heathens have a tendency to be VERY conservative to the constitutionalist side, have a strong sense of right and wrong, usually scholarly in historical matters, actually have written texts that existed in prechristian europe. All in all, very WASP like. Without the need for groveling at the foot of some midle eastern vengefull father figure that hates women.

Definition #2 can be fun too though! :)
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,165
Points
30
Duke Of Dystopia said:
JesseJ won't come out to play unfortunatly! :)

Damn... And the rituals can be so much fun!


(I fit into the #2 context of the word "heathen", though...)
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,463
Points
25
Beer God took its toll on me sunday for not making it to the 6 am worship. Chunks everywhere by 12 noon. I confessed my sins but Vodka God got me later that night.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
What if God Smoked Canibus? Would he imagine I was his God? Or would he just eat a Twinky so large even he couldn't eat it?
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,266
Points
25
What if God Smoked Canibus? Would he imagine I was his God? Or would he just eat a Twinky so large even he couldn't eat it?

Dude, bong water through the stem, stop blowing my mind away,.
 

Wannaplan?

Ready to Learn
Messages
3,252
Points
31
Update

Interesting poll so far. "Agnostic" and "God is loving" are both at about 33% each.
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,065
Points
32
My God is a personal God. I go to church to keep peace in the family. Once I was president of the church council...if you want to be turned off by orgainized religion, get involved in the politics.
 

Wannaplan?

Ready to Learn
Messages
3,252
Points
31
mike gurnee said:
...if you want to be turned off by orgainized religion, get involved in the politics.

What if you are turned off by both, like myself? I don't see politics as a suitable replacement for faith. Like myself, if you see no need for faith in your life, then there is nothing needed to replace something that doesn't exist.
 

Jen

Cyburbian
Messages
1,702
Points
26
What would happen if God committed suicide? Would the universe collapse?
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,463
Points
25
Somebody has been thinking about us.
http://channels.netscape.com/ns/news/package.jsp?name=fte/notbelieveingod/notbelieveingod

Guess Who Doesn't Believe In God?

Ten percent of Protestants, 21 percent of Roman Catholics, and 52 percent of Jews do NOT believe in God.

That's the surprising word from a new survey by Harris Interactive of 2,306 adults that shows belief in God varies quite widely among different segments of the American public. How often do we go to a place of worship? Not much. Most people attend a religious service less than once a month. Still, Americans are far more likely to believe in God and to attend religious services than people in most other developed countries, particularly in Europe.

Who believes in God?
While 79 percent of Americans believe there is a God, only 66 percent are absolutely certain of it. Nine percent do not believe in God and 12 percent aren't sure. And weirdly, not everyone who calls himself or herself a Christian or a Jew actually believes in God.

Who worships at a religious service?
Just over half (55 percent) attend a religious service a few times a year or more. Thirty-six percent attend once a month or more often, and just 26 percent say they attend every week. Forty-one percent of women and 31 percent of men attend once a month or more. Protestants (47 percent) are more likely to go to church once a month or more often than are Roman Catholics (35 percent). Jews are least likely to go with 16 percent saying they go to synagogue once a month or more. Church attendance is highest in the Midwest and lowest in the West.

Belief in God by geography and age
Eighty-two percent of Midwesterners and Southerners believe in God, compared with 75 percent in the East and West. Our beliefs get stronger as we age. Of those 25 to 29 years old, 71 percent believe in God. That number jumps to 80 percent for people over 40, and hits 83 percent for those 65 and over.

Other fascinating facts about who believes in God:

84 percent of women believe in God, compared with 73 percent of men.
91 percent of African Americans believe in God, compared with 81 percent of Hispanics and 78 percent of whites.
87 percent of Republicans believe in God, compared with 78 percent of Democrats and 75 percent of Independents.
82 percent of those with no college education believe in God, compared with 73 percent who went to college.
 
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