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Texas place names ... what is it about them?

Dan

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I'll admit to reposting this from the Band Name Generator thread, but I thought it's worthy of it's own thread.

There's a certain ring that real Texan place names have. I can't quite explain it. Consider the imaginary city of Arlen, Texas, where King of the Hill takes place. "Arlen" just has a certain Texan sound. "Arlen, North Carolina" or "Arlen, Michigan" don't sound right.

Following are some random names off the top of my head that may or may not be cities or towns in Texas, but they certainly sound like they could be in Texas, and only Texas, to my ears.

Borine
Blayloch
Culberson
McNutt
Hereford
Lock n' Load
Spur
Burnett
Buckshot
General
Reload
Gus
Schreckenbacker
Hoss
Ricochet
Agua Muerto
Hebert
Buell
Thirty Aught Six
Charley
Rex
Pilsen
Caliente Tanks
Hawk n' Spit
Arbach
Schoop
Drip Gap
Burdine


You could imagine some cowboy saying to you, without moving their mouth, "I live on FM 2543 in Borine" or "I gotta' pick up some feed at the co-op in Thirty Aught Six." You don't imagine them saying "I live off of Northland Drive in Lakewood Heights." Why does "Clint" seem so perfect as the name of a community outside of El Paso, but seem so out-of-place if it was the name of a DC suburb? (Yes, Clint is really a suburb of El Paso.)

Lock n' Load, Texas? Definitely. Lock 'n Load, Ohio? Nope. Not even a Lock n' Load Heights outside of Cleveland.
 

giff57

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Have you ever been to nack a dosh ish ? No.... well pardon me
 

Budgie

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Here are three Texas towns I've played football in (all near Hereford).

Earth
Muleshoe (hometown of David Hasselhoff)
Lazbuddie

I also like Buffalo Gap, Texas.
 

otterpop

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Here in Montana, we have, as you might guess, town with names related to ranching. such as Two Dot and (named for the brands of nearby ranches), and Roundup. Towns named for geographic features (Coffee Creek, Sand Coulee, Pompey's Pillar (named for Sacjawea's son), Moccasin (near the Moccasin Mountains). The circus used to stop in Ringling to unload the animals from the train and let them rest. Happy's Inn and Eddie's Corner are located at intersections of major roads. Some towns are named for places elsewhere - Harlem, Kremlin, and Sumatra (try and figure that one out). The town of Froid (meaning cold in French) is pronounced Freud). I like Ekalaka, that sounds pretty.

The town of Alzada used to change its name to Joe during the football season, so there was a Joe, Montana.

There is also a mountain named after a frontiersmen called Bloody Dick. Not many people want to go hiking there for some reason.
 

Dan

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Zoning Goddess said:
Puh-leeeze, Dan, you know from living in FL that Burdine('s) is for SHOPPING. ;-)

Maybe, but it still sounds like a town in Texas ... maybe an hour south of Dallas or something.

What sonds more natural?

"I'm gonna' go to the Whataburger down in Burdine."

or ...

"I'm gonna' go to the Whataburger down in Overland Park."
 

JNA

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Related / A bit OT
Interesting Analysis of Place Names

Place names in southern Indiana, like the state generally, fall into 13 categories (one example of each follows):

1. Names for a person (the most common). For example, William Henry Harrison
2. Names for other places (Switzerland County)
3. Locational names (West Fork White River)
4. Descriptive names (Tunnelton)
5. Inspirational names (Patriot)
6. Humorous or fanciful names (Santa Claus)
7. Indian and pseudo-Indian names (Wyandotte)
8. Names from languages other than English (Vincennes)
9. Incident names (Treaty Creek)
10. Folk etymology (Gnaw Bone, from Narbonne, a French city)
11. Names created by errors made by the Post Office Department of local clerks (Moores Hill, not the intended Moores Mill)
12. Coined names (Loogootee, from Lowe and Gootee)
13. Legends and anecdotes (Waterloo)


More at: http://www.usi.edu/HSI/trivia/placenames.asp
 
Last edited:
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JNA said:
11. Names created by errors made by the Post Office Department of local clerks (Moores Hill, not the intended Moores Mill)
I think your list would apply to just about anywhere (in the U.S. at least). "Fort Valley, GA" was supposed to be (or was originally) "Fox Valley". And my sister did sometimes see foxes in the area when she lived there. I don't think there has ever been a fort in the area. I don't remember where the mistake originated -- with the post office or a surveyors map or what.
 

The One

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Other real Texas Names

Cut
Sorghumville
Bald Prairie
Zipperlandville (falls county)
Pancake
Schoolerville
Heckville
Twitty
Arlie
Loco
Punkin Center
Swearingen
Hoot and Holler Crossing
 

B'lieve

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There's a Hereford here in Maryland. Tiny place in farm country halfway between Baltimore and the Pennsylvania line.
 

Kiltie

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What do you expect in a state that has drive-thru liquor AND gun stores (same store!) 8-!

Or my favorite: the drive-thru funeral home! "Yes, I'm here to see Uncle Bob" "Drive thru aisle #3 Sir, have a good day!". The scary part is that this actually exists.
 

BKM

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California has a few good ones that shout "Old West":

Hornitos
Volcano
Sutter Creek
Hangtown (Now the more prosaic, but still colorful. "Placerville.")
Malakoff Diggings
Bodie
Calistoga
 

H

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There is a Whynot, Mississippi.

Maybe if the History Channel did a documentary on the town it would start off with two weary frontier travels going along in a carriage and it would go something like this…..

“Honey, yew whawna stop hur?”

“Sure, Whynot”
 

freewaytincan

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Kiltie said:
What do you expect in a state that has drive-thru liquor AND gun stores (same store!) 8-!

Or my favorite: the drive-thru funeral home! "Yes, I'm here to see Uncle Bob" "Drive thru aisle #3 Sir, have a good day!". The scary part is that this actually exists.

Yes, and wherever you folks are from is perfect and has nothing strange or odd or downright stupid. No way. Only those backwards hicks in Texas.
 

Zoning Goddess

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freewaytincan said:
Yes, and wherever you folks are from is perfect and has nothing strange or odd or downright stupid. No way. Only those backwards hicks in Texas.
But always remember, there are many more threads about why FL is going to hell, than Texas! ;-) We seem to generate the dumbest stories on a daily basis.
 

freewaytincan

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Zoning Goddess said:
But always remember, there are many more threads about why FL is going to hell, than Texas! ;-) We seem to generate the dumbest stories on a daily basis.

Well, I do have family there, but still...

No comment. You figure it out.
 
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