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The abandoned farmhouse thread

Super Amputee Cat

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I've been taking pictures of abandoned and barely habitable farmhouses in my area during the past few months. I want to get as many as possible before they all are demolished. Some of these are already gone.

It's one thing if the house is abandoned and left to the elements, quite another if it's demolished for new subdivsions. Quite a few of these are being demolished (or have been demolished) for sprawl.

Fulton County
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Near Hudson, MI
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Clayton, MI
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Near Adrian
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Riga Township
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Blissfield Township
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Richfield Township
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Sylvania Township
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Perrysburg Township
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Rossford
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Hessville
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Henry County
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Swanton Twp.
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Spencer Twp.
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Monclova Twp.
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Waterville Twp.
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Luca

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Laudable documentary/archival effort.

I noticed there are some brick buildigns and even some of the englected wooden structures look fairly solid. Why not renovate them? It seems so wasteful to build new ones from scratch.

I guess the attitude to built form / urban form is probably the one thing I always found the most antithetical to my views in the US.
 

boilerplater

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That's a very evocative set of pics. I've always thought old farmhouses are poignant symbols of loneliness and isolation. They also remind you of their past life, all the generations that grew up there, the kids that ran through its halls...now abandoned to mice and spiders. Some of those scenes are worthy of an Andrew Wyeth or Edward Hopper painting.

I was shooting a lot of old farmhouses and barns years ago. I should scan some and post. I often find myself around old farms in my work. Occasionally you will hear of a farmhouse being preserved and moved or actually incorporated into a new developement in the form of a community building or something, but usually they are just demolished.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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Such beautiful despair.

Nice set, SAC.

I particularly like that you photographed them in winter (I presume). It just adds to the sadness and preceived loneliness of the images. If you had taken them in the summer, they would have looked like majestic ruins (akin to 16th century images of Roman ruins) rather than the desperate discards of 20th century technology and "progress".
 

michaelskis

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Next time I go up to the UP I will take some pictures for you. There are tons of them up there.

I would like to see some type of salvage effort made for some of those structures. The older ones have some amazing woodwork that might be salvageable, and some of the beams used in barn construction have wood that can be re-cut and are far better than a lot of the high quality lumber today.
 

Gedunker

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Nice photos, SAC. Have you done any research on the "T-form" plan that seems so prevalent in these images? It's not a very prevalent form here in southern Indiana -- we most commonly see the I-House (common to Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa, hence the name).
 

vaughan

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335
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11
Great set of pictures. Thanks.

I used to work as a field archaeologist in eastern Wyoming several years ago and we did some work on some abandoned homesteads out there... beautiful, but lonely. If ever there are places in the world that are haunted, its old homesteads and farmhouses on the plains.
 

Senior Jefe

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Great photos but quite sad. These places do feel haunted when you visited them. You can't help but think of the families that took shelter in these homes for the past 8 to 10 decades. You might think about donating copies to a local archive so future generations has some idea of what was lost. I took a back road tour across western Kansas this summer. There are small towns there that look much like these farm houses. Once proud stone and brick commercial buildings are falling into ruins onto broken sidewalks. Whole downtowns are boarded-up. One would think these buildings could be rehabed until you look at the local economy and study the population loss of these rural areas. No one is left but the elderly and a few farm workers and farm service workers. All the young people have moved to Kansas City or Denver (me included). Some counties in the Great Plains has only a fourth or less population compared to 100 years ago. A great book that documents these changes in eastern Montana is by a Brit, Jonathan Raban, in his book "Bad Land".
 

Super Amputee Cat

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Luca said:
Laudable documentary/archival effort.

I noticed there are some brick buildigns and even some of the englected wooden structures look fairly solid. Why not renovate them? It seems so wasteful to build new ones from scratch.
.
Many are located in fringe areas of the suburbs and the land is now being subdivided into housing tracts and condos. I found three farmhouses, two shown below, within a half-mile of each other that were vacant and no doubt being razed for new houses.





boilerplater said:
That's a very evocative set of pics. I've always thought old farmhouses are poignant symbols of loneliness and isolation. They also remind you of their past life, all the generations that grew up there, the kids that ran through its halls...now abandoned to mice and spiders. Some of those scenes are worthy of an Andrew Wyeth or Edward Hopper painting.

I was shooting a lot of old farmhouses and barns years ago. I should scan some and post.
Please feel free to add them here. After all, this is called "The Abandoned farmhouse Thread"

I often find myself around old farms in my work. Occasionally you will hear of a farmhouse being preserved and moved or actually incorporated into a new developement in the form of a community building or something, but usually they are just demolished.

True, they just bulldoze them into oblivion. But it wasn't always this way. In the 1910s and 1920s, many areas of West Toledo that were previously dairy farms were turned into large residential plats to keep up with the enourmous growth that was taking place in the area. One such plat, Homeville, was put together with a patchwork of three or four farms. At least three of the old farmhouses were preserved and incorporated into the addition, albiet they were modernized and realigned to the new street that they now had frontage on.

In another plat nearby, the farmhouse, shown below, was also retained. What's diffrerent here is that the developers even kept the original alignment (parallel to the old section road but perpendicular to the new street it now fronted on.

The house was set so far back from the old section road that one couldn't even see it anymore from that road when newer houses were built around it during the 1910s and 1920s. It's somewhat jarring to see this old brick homestead on a street of much later homes but at least it was preserved.

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Super Amputee Cat

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28
mendelman said:
Such beautiful despair.

Nice set, SAC.

I particularly like that you photographed them in winter (I presume). It just adds to the sadness and preceived loneliness of the images. If you had taken them in the summer, they would have looked like majestic ruins (akin to 16th century images of Roman ruins) rather than the desperate discards of 20th century technology and "progress".
Thanks, Mendle. Actually most were taken in the late winter or early Spring, just after I got my digital camera. I like taking pictures in the winter too, not only for the reasons you mention, but because so many of these houses would be obscured by foilage by summer.


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The above picture for instance, was taken in the summer and the ruins are obscured by trees. If the house (or remaining wall, rather) is still standing, I'll go back up there and reshoot this winter.

michalskis said:
Next time I go up to the UP I will take some pictures for you. There are tons of them up there.
Please do, I would love to see them!

We were up in the northern L. P. just last month, but I couldn't find my digital camera before we left for vacation. I'm still pulling my hair out realizing how many old farmsteads I passed by and was not able to document, some of which will no doubt be gone next time I ever get up there.

I would like to see some type of salvage effort made for some of those structures. The older ones have some amazing woodwork that might be salvageable, and some of the beams used in barn construction have wood that can be re-cut and are far better than a lot of the high quality lumber today.
I agree completely, but the developers are only interested in fresh and new and would just as soon put these things into the landfill. Never mind that the new pop-and-fresh subdivisions will probably last only a third as long as these grand old homes that they are replacing would have lasted had they not met such an early demise.
 
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mgk920

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I could take oodles of similar images here, too, especially in nearby southern Waupaca County.

BTW, the house in the 16th image from the top looks to me like it is being re-enovated.

Also, many main streets here in Appleton (Mason St north of Wisconsin Av is a great example) have most of their old farmhouses still intact and occupied, surrounded by the newer houses that came later as the city grew after WWII.

FASCINATING images, too. Someday, I want to spend a few weeks roadtripping throughout the upper Great Plains just to explore some of the kewl ghost towns that dot that area.

Mike
 

Super Amputee Cat

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Gedunker said:
Nice photos, SAC. Have you done any research on the "T-form" plan that seems so prevalent in these images? It's not a very prevalent form here in southern Indiana -- we most commonly see the I-House (common to Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa, hence the name).
I have not done any specific research on the T-Plan or Gabled Ell house type in relation to settlement patterns of farms. The builders seemed to be emulating what was popular at the time, as these house types were also common on Toledo city lots as well. The farmhouses were designed much like their city counterparts, but usually larger for having not been confined to narrow city lots.

Most were built during the period from ca 1875 to 1895 and definately started to fade from popularity after 1900 as the Foursquare grew in prominance. There are also many Gable Front and Wing houses in this area (such as the very first photo). These houses are older and not much survives in the City, although there are still quite a few in the surrounding rural areas. They seem much more prone to alteration than the T-Plan and I wouldn't be surprised if they had three or four layers of siding on them.

There were never many I-Houses around here. I found evidence of a couple of them that once existed in the City (but were later added to and modernized, like in the photo below), but so far I have not seen one true I-House my photodocumenting journey.

Moderator note:

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Super Amputee Cat

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mgk920 said:
I could take oodles of similar images here, too, especially in nearby southern Waupaca County.
Please do :)



BTW, the house in the 16th image from the top looks to me like it is being re-enovated.
If you're taking about the white one with all the windows removed, it is actually being demolished, I'm fairly certain. :-@ :-@ . There is a new house in the back of the lot and they are in the process of taking this one down by hand, it seems.
 

RandomPlanner

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The photos you've taken are interesting to us now, and will definately make people sad in the future, when none of these great structures are left. You can see from these photos that many of the homes still have potential - they can be saved now, but won't have that option within a year or so. (Some of those roofs look amazingly straight.)
I also have did a photography project on abandoned farm houses several years ago (in Central NY). I'll have to take some time to digitize them and add them to the thread. Here, in the midst of the native american land claims, many of the old farms were bought up by the Indians and then fell silent - demolition by neglect. It breaks my heart to see old homes like this - many of these buildings were build MUCH more soundly than what's replacing them.
And looking at the photos, I have to wonder what story these homes have to tell. Several of the abandoned farmhouses I went into looked as if the people had left for the day, and then just never returned. One house had toys and dishes in the kitchen. One barn had bags of seed in a wheelbarrel, with an instruction book lying open on top. Makes you wonder -- what happened??
 

otterpop

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A friend of mine lives in an old farmhouse. He lived next door to it for years and when the family came upon hard times they sold it to him. The farm was long ago subdivided for single family homes and is in the middle of West Plains, MO. It is a beautiful old house, with marvelous hardwood floors and large, airy rooms.

Wonderful pictures. The kind of neglected places you see all over the country. It is a shame they rot away, because so many of the structures are of a design we no longer build. Simple but also handsome and obviously sturdy.
 

noottamevas

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Great thread.
I will try to contribute as well. We constantly survey old farmsteads in central Illinois.
 

Super Amputee Cat

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RandomPlanner... said:
The photos you've taken are interesting to us now, and will definately make people sad in the future, when none of these great structures are left. You can see from these photos that many of the homes still have potential - they can be saved now, but won't have that option within a year or so. (Some of those roofs look amazingly straight.)
I also have did a photography project on abandoned farm houses several years ago (in Central NY). I'll have to take some time to digitize them and add them to the thread. Here, in the midst of the native american land claims, many of the old farms were bought up by the Indians and then fell silent - demolition by neglect. It breaks my heart to see old homes like this - many of these buildings were build MUCH more soundly than what's replacing them.
And looking at the photos, I have to wonder what story these homes have to tell. Several of the abandoned farmhouses I went into looked as if the people had left for the day, and then just never returned. One house had toys and dishes in the kitchen. One barn had bags of seed in a wheelbarrel, with an instruction book lying open on top. Makes you wonder -- what happened??
I share much of the same fascination that you do. When I go and take my next batch, I'm going to concentrate on taking some interior shots if the windows are open and accessable.

Moderator note:

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This house looks like it's been abandoned since the Eisenhower Administration; still standing, no doubt, due to the metal roof. I really have no problem with a house falling into ruins by itself. Abandoned farmhouses have been a part of the North American landscape for over two centuries and seeing them in a various stages of neglect and decayed states actually adds to the ambiance of the rural landscape and heritage.

However, when a perfectly good farmhouse is being torn down for new subdivisions or commercial sprawl, (or road widening to ease the traffic created by that sprawl) that's an absolute abomination. I see it as nothing more than outright Cultural Vandalism. These houses are being demolished (and burned) at unprecendeted rates around Toledo, all for the neverending insatiable demand for new housing and new roads.
 
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jread

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I don't like looking at those pictures... they make me feel really depressed. It reminds me of visiting Oklahoma when I was a kid and all the loneliness one could feel being in those old farming towns. I would completely go insane in a place like that.... *shudder*.

Beautiful pictures, though.
 

Super Amputee Cat

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jread said:
I don't like looking at those pictures... they make me feel really depressed. It reminds me of visiting Oklahoma when I was a kid and all the loneliness one could feel being in those old farming towns. I would completely go insane in a place like that.... *shudder*.

Beautiful pictures, though.
I was in the Panhandle of Oklahoma (and Texas) about nine years ago, near Boise City. It was one of the most lonely, desolate areas I had ever seen in my life...quite fascinating really. In the Rita Blanca National Grassland, I saw several abandoned farmsteads that looked like they'd been abandoned since the Great Depression.
 

jread

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Super Amputee Cat said:
I was in the Panhandle of Oklahoma (and Texas) about nine years ago, near Boise City. It was one of the most lonely, desolate areas I had ever seen in my life...quite fascinating really. In the Rita Blanca National Grassland, I saw several abandoned farmsteads that looked like they'd been abandoned since the Great Depression.
Yes, I'll do anything to avoid driving through the panhandle of Texas.... it will make you want to hang yourself. You'll see ONE tree that's miles down the road. You will eventually pass it, then you'll see it for miles in your rearview mirror..... very exciting.
 

Mud Princess

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This really is a great thread.

There's an old abandoned c. 1800s farmhouse that my husband and I pass on our way to his mother's house. Every time we pass it, we both sigh and look at each other... wishing we could buy it and fix it up. I don't know how long the building will last, structurally. The area where it's located is somewhat depressed, though, and I don't foresee the farmhouse being demolished for new development.
 

BKM

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Great thread! I love old farm houses and barns. Northwest Ohio and northern Indiana seem to have a particularly fine vernacular tradition. I even photographed an old barn (in pristine condition. This farm was NOT a failing operation in any way) when driving along the Maumee River earlier this month.

My town of residence (Vacaville, CA) has many examples of old agrarian properties now surrounded by newer housing. There is an especially fine Colonial Revival property (maybe 1920?) about a mile from me-difficult to photograph well because it is so surrounded by lush, overgrown farmyard vegetation.
 

spokanite

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Last fall I visited my Great Grandfather's homestead in Northern Idaho. Nobody in my family, myself included, had been there in over thirty years and everyone kind of forgot where it was. I got some directions from my aunt and after a number of attempts my girlfriend and I found it. It was so incredible to visit this place for the first time. This place is fairly remote now; about a thirty minute walk to the nearest main road, so nobody goes up there much. My Great Grandfather built it in around 1919 and was last used as a home in the 1950s I later found out.

The first two pictures are how the house looked in 1970.
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The next pictures are from the same angles but 34 years later.

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Richmond Jake

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Wonderful photographs. Related topic: I had a photo class in high school in which the topic for the week was barns. Mine were all abandoned. Damn, I wish I had those pics (I'll call my mom). I earned an 'A' on that assignment.
 

Dashboard

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Its true what they say: A picture tells a thousand words. You can actually just sit and study those pictures and almost begin to experience the battles they have endured – the bitter cold winters, gusting winds, and thrashing rains…and that is just the exterior. Think of the stories, the lives, the triumphs, and disappointments that were staged within its walls. Now wake up…and picture what is replacing them.

Those are great pics. Some of them are so intriguing they could be used as sets for horror flicks or a Tim Burton spook story.
 

Jaxspra

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Those pics make me sad. One of the last abandoned farmhouses here within the City limits just came down to be replaced by a bank and Walgreens (like we dont have more than 7 just in the city alone :-@ ). I did manage to save the old smokehouse that was next to the main building. What will happen to it?? Who knows, the developer jacked it up on crates and moved it across town. It is sitting in a vacant field right now until we figure out what to do with it, no one seems to want it (and why would they, its too small to be used for residence, the only thing I can see it being used for is a concension stand or retrooms at a park).
We used to have several farmhouses here (and throughout Missouri there are a ton, this one was smack dab in the middle of the City, surrounded by a Home Depot, Target and new development across the street) and so many have been lost.
Those pics are great, it seems that there are groups or someone, anyone that would want to save and rehab those buildings.
 

Cardinal

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Jaxspra said:
...I did manage to save the old smokehouse that was next to the main building. What will happen to it?? Who knows, the developer jacked it up on crates and moved it across town. It is sitting in a vacant field right now until we figure out what to do with it, no one seems to want it (and why would they, its too small to be used for residence, the only thing I can see it being used for is a concension stand or retrooms at a park)...
I had a similar thing happen with a stone barn. It was only about 20x30 feet, one and a half stories high, and still had all of the original stables, flooring, hayloft, stairs, etc inside. We had the state historical society recommend someone to mark it and take it apart so that it could be reassembled somewhere else. I suggested using it in one of the parks along the trial going through the downtown. My thought was that it would be good for housing historical exhibits that could be part of an attraction to lure tourists.
 

ahughes798

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Old Farmhouse in Hainesville, IL

On Rte. 120. People still live there, but the property is for sale. I've been in love with this house since the first time I saw it. Archtop windows...big side porch...and a root cellar.

I'm sure it will be knocked down.
 

WSU MUP Student

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I loved the collection of photos, in fact, think I saw the house I grew up in in those pictures! Well, not really, but like has been stated before, many of those houses seem to look alike... I guess that throws a wrench in to what we think of as these new cookie-cutter homes; it's been going on for over 100 years like that!

I know some people have wondered why these homes cannot be salvaged and renovated and restored to their original grandeur but having grown up in a house like this one here:

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I just cannot imagine that it would be economically feasible. The plumbing in these houses inadequate to say the least and much of the electrical system would need to be re-wired to bring them up to today's codes and many of the rooms will have only one actual outlet. Generally, there is absolutely zero interior insulation and if you're lucky, somebody may have added some exterior insulation sometime along the way. Inside the rooms, there are likely 10 coats or so of lead based paint with a few layers of wall paper thrown in between them for good measure. Lastly, without the proper maintenance over the past 100 years or so, the plasterwork is probably just crumbling away.

If somebody wanted a house with similar architecture in one of these locations, they could probably build from scratch for much cheaper and still get a design that looks like these do. If you are lucky and there isn't much warping due to water and freezing and thawing, you could salvage some of the wood materials from these old homes to put into a new one (e.g. wide wood floorboards, solid wood doors for the interior, bullseyes and frames from interior doors/windows, etc...) and still end up ahead of what it would cost to actually rehab one of these homes.
 
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wahday

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I was in the Panhandle of Oklahoma (and Texas) about nine years ago, near Boise City. It was one of the most lonely, desolate areas I had ever seen in my life...quite fascinating really. In the Rita Blanca National Grassland, I saw several abandoned farmsteads that looked like they'd been abandoned since the Great Depression.
My family came from Oklahoma and, during the dustbowl, lost the farm and everyone but my grandfather left to go to Arizona and some on to California (he had an opportunity to go to college at Texas Tech in Lubbock). Grapes of Wrath stuff all the way.

Visiting Oklahoma in my youth, I also found this area desolate and lonely. I don't have any details on what happened to their land exactly. Did they sell it? Or, like so many others, did they just pack it all up and simply abandon the property altogether?

I think that's why I like these pics so much. These structures are like gigantic question marks - who lived there? whats the story of this place? The implied narratives are just full of possibility. Very cool thread...
 

Linda_D

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I loved the collection of photos, in fact, think I saw the house I grew up in in those pictures! Well, not really, but like has been stated before, many of those houses seem to look alike... I guess that throws a wrench in to what we think of as these new cookie-cutter homes; it's been going on for over 100 years like that!

I know some people have wondered why these homes cannot be salvaged and renovated and restored to their original grandeur but having grown up in a house like this one here:

I just cannot imagine that it would be economically feasible. The plumbing in these houses inadequate to say the least and much of the electrical system would need to be re-wired to bring them up to today's codes and many of the rooms will have only one actual outlet. Generally, there is absolutely zero interior insulation and if you're lucky, somebody may have added some exterior insulation sometime along the way. Inside the rooms, there are likely 10 coats or so of lead based paint with a few layers of wall paper thrown in between them for good measure. Lastly, without the proper maintenance over the past 100 years or so, the plasterwork is probably just crumbling away.

If somebody wanted a house with similar architecture in one of these locations, they could probably build from scratch for much cheaper and still get a design that looks like these do. If you are lucky and there isn't much warping due to water and freezing and thawing, you could salvage some of the wood materials from these old homes to put into a new one (e.g. wide wood floorboards, solid wood doors for the interior, bullseyes and frames from interior doors/windows, etc...) and still end up ahead of what it would cost to actually rehab one of these homes.
What you say is so true. I also grew up in a house much like this ... it was in northern Cattaraugus County in western New York State. When I moved back to the area, I considered buying my old home, but I couldn't come to an agreement with the owners considering that it would need a new septic system as well as major structural repairs -- probably about $30,000-50,000 in work at 1998 prices -- in a depressed rural area where similar homes were going for maybe $ 50,000-$70,000 at the time.

It was just as well -- the county eventually got the property for unpaid taxes and took down the house because they wanted to straighten the road, which would have put the roadbed about two feet from the house.
 

katieee

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wow they are adorable, but it would probably take some wealthy person with a lot of time and money to renovate them and save them from suburban sprawl. places like these don't even hardly exist in California.
 

Ace22257

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Abandoned Farmhouses

Hello everybody!!! I did a search on Wisconsin abandoned farmhouses and stumbled upon your beautiful pictures. I haven't had any luck finding any links like yours for Wisconsin...not yet anyways. If any of you out here might know of any pictorial links like this for Wisconsin it would be greatly appreciated.
I love this type of photo-taking!!! I've always been attracted to these structures that have withstood the test of time and wrath of Mother Nature.
I first dabbeled with photography back in my mid-20's with a Pentax K1000 35mm "film" camera. I didn't have the best of luck getting decent photo's, having to do manual focusing and having bad eyes, my photo's were quite often blurred or i just didn't like the way they looked. Digital technology has changed all of that for me. I've had this nice plain-jane Kodak EasyShare digital camera for just over 2 years now but i've never used it for anything otherthan to take pictures of the crafty things i make to picture and sell on craigslist. I have an Aunt who's a professional photographer and as of lately she's been sharing 100's of her photograph's with me from her worldly travels.
I was looking at her beautiful picture's one day and for some reason or another i started taking more of an interest in my camera and the world around me. I pass thru very rural Wisconsin farmland (15 miles) to get to work. I just suddenly started to REALLY look at some of the old wethered and beaten barns i pass by every day that sit somewhere along this beautiful route i travel...hence my interest in photography has been re-born.
Back in my early days (23 years ago) when i traveled around Wisconsin using my "film" camera i came across just a couple places...a long abandoned farm & small town country home. I didn't jot down my locations at that time (DUH). I can recall only the location of one of them. Whether or not the structures are still there today i wouldn't know. This was back in 1981.
If anybody happens to be looking for weather beaten structures in Wisconsin, if it's still there today(?) off Hwy 14 W from Madison, Wisconsin is a VERY small farming village called Bosstown that had (at that time) MAYBE 3-5 homes. I cant recall any types of businesses. They're might be an abandoned small general store. Bosstown is clearly marked with a state issued sign, it's unincoporated. This place MIGHT be a city block long if that. Hwy 14 will take you right too it. Back in 1981 there use to be a light yellow/brownish colored stone home. 23 years of weathering the wrath of nature i would imagine it's roof has caved in. Being a stone structure the skeleton of the house should still be there. The interior would be very unsafe to enter as parts of it were caving in back in 1981. It sat on the right hand side just a few yards from the hwy clearly visable...or was, back in 1981.
If the structure is still there today it would be well worth the drive. The farther west from Madison you get on Hwy 14 you'll be passing thru some VERY scenic countryside and many small vilages and farming communities...some of Wisconsin's prettiest hill country that's stunningly beautiful in the Autumn.
I could ramble on and on LOL...if anybody can help me with a direct link to these kinds of places in Wisconsin i'd be enternally grateful.....happy house hunting everyone.....
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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Between Whitewater and Ft. Atkinson, on the north side of the road, was an old motor court. There was a sign atop one of the cabins that said "Haven", I think. I don't know if it is still there since they put in the bypass on Highway 12, but it was a wonderful old abandoned building. We tend not to have many of these abandoned structures in Wisconsin. The exceptions are some crumbling industrial buildings. The old farmhouses tend to get torn down.

If you are ever out west it is wothwhile to seek out some of the more remote mining towns in the mountains, or to get off the interstate to visit some of the small towns in western Nebraska and the Dakotas. Come to think of it, I know some good examples from eastern Colorado too.

I came across an image of the Haven Motel at http://personalpages.tds.net/~oldtoivo/Wisconsinosity/Jefferson/haven_motel.htm

Here is another great site I stumbled upon: http://www.opacity.us/locations/#site2
 
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Ace22257

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Haven Motel

I'll have to put this on my list of stops for the coming weekend. You wouldn't by any chance know what village it might be nearby...hwy 12 east runs quite a distance. I'd hate to pass it by. I moved to a rural Oregon location 2 years ago and i've just started searching all the backroads but all i've been able to find is old weathered and beaten barns. I did find one abandoned ghost house that's hidden mostly by folige. I'll be going back too the house to photograph it during the Winter. If you're interested it's a 2-story house located at 6152 County Hwy A just west of Oregon a few miles. Thank you so much for the info....


I came across an image of the Haven Motel at http://personalpages.tds.net/~oldtoivo/Wisconsinosity/Jefferson/haven_motel.htm

Here is another great site I stumbled upon: http://www.opacity.us/locations/#site2
 

mgk920

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4,202
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I'll have to put this on my list of stops for the coming weekend. You wouldn't by any chance know what village it might be nearby...hwy 12 east runs quite a distance. I'd hate to pass it by. I moved to a rural Oregon location 2 years ago and i've just started searching all the backroads but all i've been able to find is old weathered and beaten barns. I did find one abandoned ghost house that's hidden mostly by folige. I'll be going back too the house to photograph it during the Winter. If you're interested it's a 2-story house located at 6152 County Hwy A just west of Oregon a few miles. Thank you so much for the info....
It's along US 12/WI 89 between Fort Atkinson and Whitewater. The US 12 Whitewater bypass starts a short distance southeast of its location.

See:
http://www.bing.com/maps/default.aspx?v=2&FORM=LMLTCP&cp=42.875256~-88.810601&style=h&lvl=15&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&phx=0&phy=0&phscl=1&encType=1

It is in the heavily wooded area on the right side of the highway in the center of the image.

A clearer closeup image, taken during a different time of the year (no leaves on the trees), showing the layout of the site is at:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=k&ll=42.874985,-88.810411&spn=0.001024,0.002747&z=19

It looks like it would have been a neat place to stay during a roadtrip in its day.

A Google Streetview image of it is at:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=42.874816,-88.810601&spn=0,359.978027&t=k&z=16&layer=c&cbll=42.874942,-88.810924&panoid=pdSvckRUK3sMbZJgcnqhbQ&cbp=12,59.77,,0,5

I've always thought that it would be kewl if someone could give a try at restoring at least part of it to usable condition, as often building shells of that era were very well built.

Enjoy!

Mike
 
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Linda_D

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Nice photos, SAC. Have you done any research on the "T-form" plan that seems so prevalent in these images? It's not a very prevalent form here in southern Indiana -- we most commonly see the I-House (common to Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa, hence the name).
The t-form is ubiquitous in WNY, especially in the rural areas, but also in many small towns as well. They seem to have been built from the 1840s (as the one I grew up in was) into the early 1900s. They are always special to me
 

Ace22257

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3
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0
Thank you Mike. That google link was quite helpful in locating the place. I cant wait to see it as it is now. I'll definately be stopping by the place this coming weekend.


It's along US 12/WI 89 between Fort Atkinson and Whitewater. The US 12 Whitewater bypass starts a short distance southeast of its location.

See:
http://www.bing.com/maps/default.aspx?v=2&FORM=LMLTCP&cp=42.875256~-88.810601&style=h&lvl=15&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&phx=0&phy=0&phscl=1&encType=1

It is in the heavily wooded area on the right side of the highway in the center of the image.

A clearer closeup image, taken during a different time of the year (no leaves on the trees), showing the layout of the site is at:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=k&ll=42.874985,-88.810411&spn=0.001024,0.002747&z=19

It looks like it would have been a neat place to stay during a roadtrip in its day.

A Google Streetview image of it is at:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=42.874816,-88.810601&spn=0,359.978027&t=k&z=16&layer=c&cbll=42.874942,-88.810924&panoid=pdSvckRUK3sMbZJgcnqhbQ&cbp=12,59.77,,0,5

I've always thought that it would be kewl if someone could give a try at restoring at least part of it to usable condition, as often building shells of that era were very well built.

Enjoy!

Mike
Every time i come back here and look at the ghost houses you have pictured here i think i see something different in each one of them. Does anyone know of a web link where you can post your photographs of old weathered barns? I have some great photo's of old barns i'd love to share....
 
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Cardinal

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Another site you may try is www.ghosttowns.com. There are some horrible blinking ads that you have to put up with, but the site has some useful information. Definitely stop back to give us an update on the Haven, and a picture or two.
 

mcitton

Member
Messages
10
Points
1
Some methods to save these from development

Where demolition is for new development, Ft. Collins, Colorado has had some luck requiring these homes be fixed up and incorprated into the new development. If its a singel-family type development, it makes perfect sense that you can fix up this house and leave it standing on a lot in the new street network. We've even seen farmhouses and barns preserved as HOA community centers. When you're building dozens or hundreds of homes, it should be feasible to fix up the old one, given it can then be sold.

We've even had interest in moving homes where they are in the way of commercial development - say along the old highways that sued to be rural and are now beign developed. Moving houses - esepcially wood frame - and palcing them on a foundation eslewhere is nothing new and was more common in earlier eras. Often it can be done for about $25,000 (if the mvoe is local) plus of course the cost of land, development fees, and foundation for the new lot.

Of course, the cost of housing in Colorado is relatively high compared to much of the midwest, say. But, old homes in growing areas fetch a good price on the market. It's supply and demand - they simply don't build any more historic homes.
 

RockyMtnGuy

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5
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This brings back memories

These look a lot like houses I lived in when I was younger.

When I got a older I had an interesting experience. I bought an 80 year old Victorian-style house in a nice neighborhood. More precisely, it was a style called "Greek Revival", which was popular 80 years ago. There were only two 2-story houses on the block, mine and the one next door.

Over the next 25 years, the whole area started to look like my house. The whole neighborhood ended up being two or two-and-a-half story Victorian style houses that looked a lot like my house.

At that point I sold out at an incredible profit and retired to the mountains to devote the rest of my life to skiing.

However, the last time I checked, my old neighborhood had gone so far upmarket that I got nosebleeds just looking at it. It was all 3-story Victorian yuppie mansions with underground parking. However, despite my assumptions that they would just bulldoze it (it was 100 years old) and build something huge, my old house was still there and the roof was original. Everything else about it was new. I guess they just liked the design.

Anyhow, I guess the moral of this story is that people just love the old classical designs. You can't beat them for architectural beauty.
 

tilia2

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
Great Thread. My Grandmother used to live in Lancaster Co., Va. and we would drive around and she would comment on these old falling down places "if I was rich, I would buy all these places and tear them down" I would say "if I was rich. I would buy all these places and fix them up". It seems that many places only persist for one generation, or two, from simple farmhouses to large mansions in our inner cities. We are so mobile and land and homes are just another commodity. You see a lot of old falling down farmhouses in Ohio and Indiana with the newer one story vinyl home built on the same property. I have been noticing at a lot of 'L" shaped houses lately.
 

TerraSapient

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Messages
2,588
Points
17
Some extraordinary photographs here! I recognize some of the places too! So exciting to see pictures of my old hometown area. :)
 

indiajpp

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
Hi Super Cat! I visit Souther Illinois quite often, Mt. Vernon area. Could you tell me where to find some of these homes? I would love to photograph them. Are all of these beautiful pictures you took in Mt. Vernon area? Are these the counties you have listed?
Would appreciate any feedback you could give me.
Thanks!
Cyndi
 

Linda_D

Cyburbian
Messages
1,725
Points
19
Not an abandoned farmhouse but a glorious abandoned barn in the little town of Sheffield, PA which is in NW PA south of Warren. If I had beaucoup bucks, I'd have it taken apart piece by piece and resurrected on my land in Cattaraugus County. Maybe I'd make it into a house. I just love it.

4446164141_e08e437be7_s.jpg

Here's a link to more images of this wonderful barn: Old Barn
 

Super Amputee Cat

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Messages
2,119
Points
28
In the upcoming weeks, I'll be updating some of my old pictures plus adding some new ones:

Here are the first two:

DSCN0772-02-1.jpg
2005

OttawaLakeYankeeRd2b2010-2.jpg
2010

OttawaLake12700YankeeRd12005.jpg
2005

OttawaLake12700YankeeRd22010-2.jpg
2010
 
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Dan

Dear Leader
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Moderator note:

2019-10-06: Replaced watermarked images with clean images from the OP's Photobucket album.
 
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