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The end of an era - Wisconsin Dells welcome sign

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
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34
The end of an era

I found this in The Business Journal of Greater Milwaukee.

"The mammoth Wisconsin Dells welcome sign on I-90/94, the largest outdoor billboard in the nation, has been demolished to make room for an addition to the Kalahari Resort & Convention Center.

Since 1980, the 6,300-square foot billboard was the gateway to Wisconsin Dells and showcased businesses on behalf of the Dells area visitors and convention bureau.

Todd Nelson, the owner of the Kalahari, demolished the billboard to build 120 luxury condominiums and double the size of his 70-acre convention and vacation facility.

The billboard was originally erected to direct travelers to a new interstate exit, exit 92. While the Dells billboard was slightly smaller than several electronic boards that appear in Times Square, New York City, it was the biggest traditional board made of wood and paint, said a spokesman for the Kalahari."


(Sigh.) I guess we just lost another piece of the Wisconsin landscape to sprawl.

[OT] The Kalahari is a desert-themed water park (huh?) in lush and wooded part of Wisconsin (huh?).[/OT]
 

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
2,251
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30
Re: The end of an era

Cardinal said:
I found this in The Business Journal of Greater Milwaukee.

"The mammoth Wisconsin Dells welcome sign on I-90/94, the largest outdoor billboard in the nation, has been demolished to make room for an addition to the Kalahari Resort & Convention Center.

Since 1980, the 6,300-square foot billboard was the gateway to Wisconsin Dells and showcased businesses on behalf of the Dells area visitors and convention bureau.

Todd Nelson, the owner of the Kalahari, demolished the billboard to build 120 luxury condominiums and double the size of his 70-acre convention and vacation facility.

The billboard was originally erected to direct travelers to a new interstate exit, exit 92. While the Dells billboard was slightly smaller than several electronic boards that appear in Times Square, New York City, it was the biggest traditional board made of wood and paint, said a spokesman for the Kalahari."


(Sigh.) I guess we just lost another piece of the Wisconsin landscape to sprawl.



We were in the Dells a couple of years ago, the first time I had been there since 1976.

Though I barely remember the town from my first visit, I could tell that a lot had changed. A lot of big motels, ugly condos and relentless creeping crud-sprawl that I am sure only had been there for less than ten years. The sheer cartoon scale of the place was depressing. I kept thinking...what the Hell did they tear down for that piece of $hit!

I also found it more than a little bewildering that a place could have so many outdoor water theme parks when their season can't extend much past late June to Labor Day. I mean, this is Wisconsin, not San Diego. We were there in early June and it was cold as Hell.

This Todd Nelson guys sounds like a real prick. I can just picture him now: Cocky little 30-something with a smug look on his face and cell phone in hand, leaning over the door of his SUV and oozing with arrogance from a sucessful day of greasing up the local politicians to shoehorn in his crap project.

I hate land developers. Might as well call them land "rapers" because that is exactly what they do. Yet because of lax zoning laws, land use standards that encourage wastefulness, and ridiculous bankruptcy laws, they will continue to get away from this kind of crap in perpetuity. Thus it's pointless to wish this guy will go bankrupt, because he will just file Chapter 7 and go through the whole process again.
 
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