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NEVERENDING ♾️ The NEVERENDING Bicycle Thread

nuovorecord

Cyburbian
Messages
444
Points
13
donk said:
In honour of the Tour and a local rider who has actually worn the yellow jersey, combined with my new digital camera, here are a few pictures of Steve Bauer, one of North America's greatest cyclists.

Wonder if Lance will be doing this in 15 years?

Bauer was one of my favorite racers back in the day. He had a couple of major disappointments in his career: Second place in the Olympics and a crash with Claude Criquelion in the final sprint of the '98 World Championships. Great sprinter!

I don't know about Lance doing races in 15 years, but he's doing this ride in September...and my wife signed me up for my birthday present! Whoo Hoo! I can't wait. Of course, if the ride sells out, there's 3,500 people vying to get close to Lance, so who knows if I'll get to actually meet the dude.
 

michiganplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
472
Points
14
What's wrong with my Wal-Mart bike?

The girlfriend got a bike this weekend. You could maybe call it a bike, but it is a cheap Wal-Mart one. (Which has left me with pangs of guilt and personal anguish ever since)

It has two wheels and looks like any other bike i've seen so what's wrong with my bike?

It has taken me to these places and navigated them with ease.
http://www.mmba.org/trails.php?trail=11
http://www.mmba.org/trails.php?trail=1

This is my first foray into serious biking and before I spent the big bucks, I had to know if biking was going to stick. I will admit to thinking that my Wal-Mart bike was beneath others on the trail at first, but as I bike more and build relationships with other trail riders and burn passed some of them I know now its not all about the bike.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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31
michiganplanner said:
It has two wheels and looks like any other bike i've seen so what's wrong with my bike?

I'll be the first one to answer this, others please chime in.

There is nothing wrong with that bike per se, it is being ridden, but in the long term it will cause you much grief. The primary cause is going to be replacement parts and how the parts wear as well as how much you enjoy the sport. While there is no need for a $5000 bike, a $500 bike rides noticeably bettter, even to novices than a $150 bike.

Also recognize that just because it looks like a mtb does not make it one.
 

nuovorecord

Cyburbian
Messages
444
Points
13
michiganplanner said:
It has two wheels and looks like any other bike i've seen so what's wrong with my bike?

This is my first foray into serious biking and before I spent the big bucks, I had to know if biking was going to stick. I will admit to thinking that my Wal-Mart bike was beneath others on the trail at first, but as I bike more and build relationships with other trail riders and burn passed some of them I know now its not all about the bike.

I think you made a wise decision on a first bike. I've seen so many people spend $800 or more on a first bike, only to ride it three times and put it away. But donk is correct, as you ride more and get "into" the sport more, you'll discover the limitations of your $150 bike. Parts break or wear out much more readily on cheap bikes and they can be more difficult to keep in proper operating order. Wal-Mart typically doesn't provide any service and local bike shops are loathe to work on low-end bikes. So in the long run, you may be looking at another bike purchase in a few years.

But, bottom line is, if you're out riding and having fun on it, it's all good! You're right...it's not all about the bike.
 
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michiganplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
472
Points
14
Oh yeah, I am already aware of the limitations. I've sampled a few other trail bikes and certainly know where my bike stands. I've pretty much determined that this bike will be good for the rest of this summer and probably half of next summer as I ride and look for the bike at the next level.
Originally posted by donk
Also recognize that just because it looks like a mtb does not make it one.
After some of my friends and I completed a fairly difficult trail we met up with a more seasoned rider that was impressed by our skills and stamina. He was completely floored that Wal-Mart carried bikes with suspension and even disc brakes. He then pointed out that a real mtb usually doesn't have a kick stand, but he agreed with our ride it 'til we make sure we like it and are good enough to deserve a more suited bike rationale.

I just wanted to point out that you don't necessarily need to feel ashamed by sporting a Wal-mart special. My fiance' is griping about a new bike and I'll bet hers will come from there too. Of course she has to ride her current pos a little more to make sure she too is really into biking.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
Welcome
Ride your bike with pride my friend for you have just taken your first sip of the Coolaid that is cycling. We need fresh blood in the cult and you'll know when to upgrade. Until then, thrash that POS bike of yours like you stole it from a rich kid! I started on a POS and $3000 worth of bike crap and 6 bikes later I still ride my Schwinn. Its all good. :)
Welcome.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
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michiganplanner said:
I just wanted to point out that you don't necessarily need to feel ashamed by sporting a Wal-mart special. My fiance' is griping about a new bike and I'll bet hers will come from there too. Of course she has to ride her current pos a little more to make sure she too is really into biking.

Hint number 1, if she is about your size, give her yours and then you go and buy a better one from a bike shop. Having a partner close to your size can work wonders for rationalizing gear upgrades, at least that is what I've been told, I'm too tall to have first hand experience.
 

noj

Cyburbian
Messages
516
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16
donk said:
2 awesome sources of coverage

www.eurosport.com and www.cyclingtv.com

I for one hope the race unfolds in one of 2 ways. Ullrich steps up and wins OR armstrong wins, by wearing the yellow jersey from start to finish and takes a few of the other jerseys like Merkx would. I would prefer for Armstrong to lose. Maybe Levi will step up this year?

Its turing out to be a belting tour this year. Two great stages over the weekend.
It looks like Lance is in a bit of trouble now, depending upon what happens tomorrow.

The key was not yesterday, when he dropped the jersey. It was not when Kloeden took time out of him the previous day (how close was that finish?).

It was when Vino attacked him repeatedly, and three things became clear. One his team went to pieces. Two, T-Mobile can do this all fortnight - have Vino attack until Lance is tired. If he gets away, he makes time. If he doesn't, they soften Lance for a Klodi attack. Meanwhile, Ullrich can sit on Lance's wheel all day, taking time where he can.

But the third, and most major, sign IMO that Lance may lose was that he was climbing out of the saddle. He very rarely does so, except attacking an uphill finish. Staying in the saddle, it's much easier to recover for the next day. Lance does so wherever he can. And yet here he was, dancing on the pedals, on a category two climb.

Great rides from Rasmussen, Moreau, and Voigt. Great to see a madman attacker get his reward. And great to see a long range attack by a proper, honest-to-God climber in the Mountains jersey.

Tomorrow should be great.
 

prana

Cyburbian
Messages
565
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17
Great summary noj. We'll see how Lance does tomorrow in the real mountains. I would loved to have listened to the Discovery team discussion after Sunday! I bet Lance ripped into them pretty good.
 

mileage2762004

Cyburbian
Messages
150
Points
7
Back on the bike buying thread; DON'T buy one a Walmart et al. The assembly is probably wrong or badly done, lose nuts and bolts, not adjusted, cables messed up, and any number of other problems.

Anyone's best bet is to go to a bike shop and let the folks know what you can afford to spend, usually they will guide you to the best bike for your money. Additionally, bike shops often have trade-ins at very reasonable prices for a couple of year old bike. And they will fit it you, adjust it and often have good advise on how to keep it turned up (and sometimes will offer a yearly turn up).

I bought my road bike (only one) in 1999. The shop still sends my a post card every year telling me its time for a turn up. Okay, if something is wrong and needs to be replaced, they charge for the part, but labor is free. Walmart won't do that.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
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31
Back In The Saddle Again

Last Saturday, this Bear dropped his bike off at the Bowling Green, OH, shop for a few minor things. Picking-up the bike on Thursday. Really looking forward to getting back in the saddle again.

It's a 1983/1984 Myata 12-Speed Racer. What a great set of wheels. Weighs about as much as the period at the end of this sentence.

Fun fun fun. Oak Openings bike trail system here I come!

Bear With Protective Cup
 

mileage2762004

Cyburbian
Messages
150
Points
7
Bear - My bike is a Trek 2120 carbon fiber 27 speed, like yours it weights in at 16 pounds (frame), campy componants, ultralight wheels, my basic junk, total weight is 21 pounds. Love the beast.:)
 

noj

Cyburbian
Messages
516
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16
prana said:
Great summary noj. We'll see how Lance does tomorrow in the real mountains. I would loved to have listened to the Discovery team discussion after Sunday! I bet Lance ripped into them pretty good.

Thanks prana. Todays stage is looking a good one; Discovery are looking far better today than they did over the weekend.

Edit: Looks like its going to be a frantic last hour. Discovery are setting a fantastic pace. Mayo dropped off already

Another edit: Wow. What a day's racing. Armstrong takes minutes off all his rivals and disproves all the rubbish I wrote yesterday. Discovery were fairly blistering today and rode everyone else off the road. Great win at the end for Valverde - tipped by many to be the next Lance.
 
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Gedunker

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47
Thrilling ride today by Rasmussen. Boy looks to have a future.

Question: I always had center-pulls and see fewer and fewer of them these days. I'd like to hear the benefits of side-pulls. Thanks so much!
 

mileage2762004

Cyburbian
Messages
150
Points
7
For Mountain Bikes I believe center pulls have more stopping power, for road bikes side pulls have less weight and simpler. I've always used side pulls, but the kids and SO have centers on their bikes. Adjusting centers can be difficult.
 

donk

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Gedunker said:
Thrilling ride today by Rasmussen. Boy looks to have a future.

Unfortunately he is in his 30's and an ex mtb world champ. his future is now.

I know a few guys who were on his mtb team and they still keep in touch. How does this sound for "fun" 5 hour road ride, with 1/2 water bottle and a banana. he is about 6'2 and weighs in the 140's.
 

Gedunker

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mileage2762004 said:
For Mountain Bikes I believe center pulls have more stopping power, for road bikes side pulls have less weight and simpler. I've always used side pulls, but the kids and SO have centers on their bikes. Adjusting centers can be difficult.

Thanks. I'm looking at a road (touring) bike so it seems side pulls are in my future. My only experience with them was waaaaay back and I seem to painfully recall a fall when the brakes were applied a little too agressively. Hopefully this old dog can learn new tricks...:)

donk: 33 is young! Perhaps not in le tour, but to me;-)
 

mileage2762004

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Gedunker said:
Thanks. I'm looking at a road (touring) bike so it seems side pulls are in my future. My only experience with them was waaaaay back and I seem to painfully recall a fall when the brakes were applied a little too agressively. Hopefully this old dog can learn new tricks...:)

donk: 33 is young! Perhaps not in le tour, but to me;-)

Basically, side pulls are simpler to maintain and have more stopping power, and old statement on biking, 'Its not if you're going to fall, but when"
 

nuovorecord

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444
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13
noj said:
Thanks prana. Todays stage is looking a good one; Discovery are looking far better today than they did over the weekend.

Edit: Looks like its going to be a frantic last hour. Discovery are setting a fantastic pace. Mayo dropped off already

Another edit: Wow. What a day's racing. Armstrong takes minutes off all his rivals and disproves all the rubbish I wrote yesterday. Discovery were fairly blistering today and rode everyone else off the road. Great win at the end for Valverde - tipped by many to be the next Lance.

My hunch is that DC just took the day off on Sunday and that Lance was putting on a show. He clearly was the class of the field today and there's little doubt who is in charge in this race now.

Food for thought: If Lance does win his 7th TdF this year, would you say it's the greatest individual sporting accomplishment of all time? Or, has he already achieved that status with 6 wins? I'm trying to think of something that's comprable, but nothing's coming to mind at the moment. What do ya'll think?
 

noj

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nuovorecord said:
My hunch is that DC just took the day off on Sunday and that Lance was putting on a show. He clearly was the class of the field today and there's little doubt who is in charge in this race now.

Food for thought: If Lance does win his 7th TdF this year, would you say it's the greatest individual sporting accomplishment of all time? Or, has he already achieved that status with 6 wins? I'm trying to think of something that's comprable, but nothing's coming to mind at the moment. What do ya'll think?

I think that's an incredibly hard question to answer, nuovorecord. It certainly has to be up there, but to compare sport with sport is very tricky. It's difficult to say how he would have competed in different times (aside from very well). For instance in the time of Merckx, Merckx competed in all events throughout the year, not just le tour and it could also be argued that the competition was harder then. Of course to be a successful cyclist you also have to have a great team helping you along which Lance has had.

All I can say that he is an incredible athlete and cyclist and his achievements are one of the greatest sporting accomplishments of all time. He is a great competitor and his career is an incredible story.
 

JNA

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Recumbent cyclists are hardly laid back about their bikes
Headline and Article in the Louisville Courier-Journal:
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050724/SPORTS09/507240381/1038

Highlights:
"Cyclists claim recumbent bikes offer a more enjoyable ride with less pressure on the hands, wrists, shoulders and rear end.

But regardless of materials, recumbent bikes offer a more aerodynamic ride, allowing the rider to maintain high speeds on flat roads and down hills with less effort than a traditional bike."
 

michiganplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
472
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14
So with my previously mentioned bike purchasing habits aside, one of the cool and exciting things that I have fallen into since I started riding was being asked to aid the city I live in garner support/plan/execute for a bike path/trail throughout town.

Most of the major work was done by my friend while he was in a community leadership forum/class. But we still need to raise awarness and support for our cause. We want to start a bike team and host rides throughout the city and other places. Our issue now is what to name our bike team. Any suggestions on team names. I will try to post some links on news stories that detail my friends efforts and a little bit about the city.
 

BKM

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29
Hey. I notice on his website that Kunstler went for a little bicycle ride. Maybe he will mellow out some now! ;-)
 

Rumpy Tunanator

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Ever since the SS Tuna Bike broke in Buffalo and was left to rust behind my old apts. garage, I need to get a new bike. Any suggestions for a cheap bastard like me? Is Huffy or Murray still around?;)

Seriously, any recommendations?
 

donk

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Rumpy Tunanator said:
Ever since the SS Tuna Bike broke in Buffalo and was left to rust behind my old apts. garage, I need to get a new bike. Any suggestions for a cheap bastard like me? Is Huffy or Murray still around?;)

Seriously, any recommendations?

huffy still exists, but barely.

http://www.bicycleretailer.com/bicy...article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000990695

My only advice is to go tot a real bike shop and buy the cheapest thing they have there. Considering where you live is relatively flat, I'd consider going for a cruiser/single speed type bike that can be found for cheap at a garage sale.
 

nuovorecord

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444
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Rumpy Tunanator said:
Ever since the SS Tuna Bike broke in Buffalo and was left to rust behind my old apts. garage, I need to get a new bike. Any suggestions for a cheap bastard like me? Is Huffy or Murray still around?;)

Seriously, any recommendations?

Check around for a good used bike...better bike, less money.
 

PlannerByDay

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Messages
1,825
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24
WOW finally the humidity and heat has lifted. So I rode into work to day. What a great morning for a ride.

For those of you who don't rely on your bicycle as your only means of transportation do you still ride into work when it is 70+ degrees and humidity is 60%at 7:30am?

Boy I miss riding into work in the AM. It jumpstarts my morning.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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7,937
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39
PlannerByDay said:
For those of you who don't rely on your bicycle as your only means of transportation do you still ride into work when it is 70+ degrees and humidity is 60%at 7:30am?

I have not ridden into work in 3-4 weeks now because the heat, smog, and humidity have been so bad here this summer. Didn't ride today because, well - I'm tired from the heat, smog, and humidity...
 

Wulf9

Member
Messages
922
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22
Temperature is not relevant when you live close enough to work. Our mornings are about 60-70 degrees and very clear. Ride home is often 100 degrees.

I put fenders on the bike, so I can ride on wet roads if there is a break in the rain (happens often enough to be a viable option.)
 

Boru

Cyburbian
Messages
235
Points
9
Temperature is not very relevant here. Ireland is a very (sometimes frustratingly) mild country. The temp is never really freezing and never over 30 C (in fact the highest this summer has been 26 C, and that was only for one day). It does rain quite a bit, but their are usually enough breaks in the rain for me to cycle the 40 minutes to work.

The main problem weatherwise is wind. My God is this country windy. Ireland is the windiest country in Europe (which the government is starting to wake up to in the promotion of windfarms). The wind generally blows from the south-west. Which happens to be the direction I have to go to get to work:-( . It wouldnt be so bad, but the wind seems to have changed direction when I go home in the evenings. So I end up feeling as if I have my own personal wind blowing in the opposite direction to the one I am cycling in. I'm sure I'm not the only one who thinks this though.
 

BKM

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Boru said:
Temperature is not very relevant here. Ireland is a very (sometimes frustratingly) mild country. The temp is never really freezing and never over 30 C (in fact the highest this summer has been 26 C, and that was only for one day). It does rain quite a bit, but their are usually enough breaks in the rain for me to cycle the 40 minutes to work.

The main problem weatherwise is wind. My God is this country windy. Ireland is the windiest country in Europe (which the government is starting to wake up to in the promotion of windfarms). The wind generally blows from the south-west. Which happens to be the direction I have to go to get to work:-( . It wouldnt be so bad, but the wind seems to have changed direction when I go home in the evenings. So I end up feeling as if I have my own personal wind blowing in the opposite direction to the one I am cycling in. I'm sure I'm not the only one who thinks this though.

I work in an area that basically is the transition between the San Francisco Bay region (65-80 degrees) and the Sacramento Valley (95-105 degrees). This difference creates a serious wind tunnel effect.

Of course, living in the next town up the freeway, where the wind has been absent for six weeks, we were 109 on Friday and 107 on Saturday. Not fun. Would rather have the wind :)
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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26,673
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70
President sets pace at Tour de Crawford
Bush takes some media along for ride, proves to be strong on mountain bike

Headline and Article from USA Today:
http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/sports/20050815/b4int_focus15.art.htm

Highlight:

I love exercise. Prior to learning about mountain biking, I was a jogger. And then, like a lot of baby boomers, my knees gave out. I believe that mountain biking is going to be an outlet for a lot of people my age. I'm 59, and people are going to realize you get as much aerobic exercise — if not more on the mountain bike — without being hobbled.”

His observation is borne out by the experts. According to University of Pittsburgh Center for Sports Medicine's Freddie Fu, one of the nation's leading orthopedic surgeons, boomers are suffering knee and other leg injuries brought on by years of pounding the pavement. Fu recommends that they take up soft-contact sports such as cycling. Fu even sponsors his own cycling team.

“Riding a bicycle gives the cardiovascular benefits of running without the impact,” Fu says.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Ore To Shore

This weekend (8-20) Marquette, MI (in Michigan's Upper Peninsula) will host its' annual ORE TO SHORE bike race. This 48-mile race starts in Ishpeming and works its' way down to the Lake Superior shore in Marquette. The expected number of participants this year is 1800, the largest ever.

Mountain bikers from all over the country converge on Marquette for this race. The big draw is the 48-mile HARD ROCK. The SOFT ROCK (24 miles aprox) is also a huge draw. There are also short races for the kids, near the campus of Northern Michigan University.

Bear
 

michiganplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
472
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14
Ore to Shore

I know several people that participated in Ore to Shore. Out of my league until atleast next year if I can stay injury free.
 

PlannerByDay

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24
Yesterday did the Assenmacher 100. Didn't actually do the century but did the metric century in 4 hours 14 minutes. It was said there were 600 riders yesterday.

Some last minute prep before the Wife and I do the DALMAC over labor day weekend. Looks like there will be over 2000 people for the 4 day trip spread across the 5 different routes. Feel great this AM, looking forward to riding again tonight.
 

BKM

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29
Help!

I'm having a growing problem in my cycling-somehow, the "biomechanics" feel wrong. It's not a new bicycle issue, even. My peddle stroke feels off, and I don't know what I need to change. Sometimes, I observe lower back pain and my calve muscles feel tight/stretched.

It may be simply a need to adopt a better stretching regime (I am 42 now :-c ), or there may be something wrong with how my bicycle is set up. Maybe because I am too fat and that is throwing me out of alignment?

Has anyone had any experience with a "Sports Doctor" who can observe you while riding and give advice on what you need to do? More self-perceptive people may be able to figure it out on their own, but I almost feel like I need advice/observation by somebody who knows what he or she is doing.
 

PlannerByDay

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BKM said:
I'm having a growing problem in my cycling-somehow, the "biomechanics" feel wrong. It's not a new bicycle issue, even. My peddle stroke feels off, and I don't know what I need to change. Sometimes, I observe lower back pain and my calve muscles feel tight/stretched.

It may be simply a need to adopt a better stretching regime (I am 42 now :-c ), or there may be something wrong with how my bicycle is set up. Maybe because I am too fat and that is throwing me out of alignment?

Has anyone had any experience with a "Sports Doctor" who can observe you while riding and give advice on what you need to do? More self-perceptive people may be able to figure it out on their own, but I almost feel like I need advice/observation by somebody who knows what he or she is doing.

Try moving your seat forward. There should be a screw under your seat that will allow your seat to slide forward and backward.

One thing. Before you move your seat mark it. You will want to beable to move it back into the org. position if it does not help.
 

donk

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BKM said:
I'm having a growing problem in my cycling-somehow, the "biomechanics" feel wrong. It's not a new bicycle issue, even. My peddle stroke feels off, and I don't know what I need to change. Sometimes, I observe lower back pain and my calve muscles feel tight/stretched.

For back pain, do sit ups and crunches and get a swiss ball. It is all about core muscle strength.

I'd also suggest going back to teh store where you got yoru bike (festina specialized right?) and getting them to redo the fitting. Sore calves may require a cleat realignment.
 

BKM

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donk said:
For back pain, do sit ups and crunches and get a swiss ball. It is all about core muscle strength.

I'd also suggest going back to teh store where you got yoru bike (festina specialized right?) and getting them to redo the fitting. Sore calves may require a cleat realignment.

My core muscle strength is probably pretty pathetic. I have a gym literally two blocks away. No excuse, really.:-$

When I come back from vacation in a couple of weeks, I need to start going to the gym.

I have been messing around with the cleat position for some time and cannot seem to get it right. I am getting frustrated with it-that's the reason for the "help" plea.

Maybe I should have a fit check thing done at a good shop. They may be able to check cleat position as well.

(The Festina is toast. The frame literally CRACKED for some reason right on rear drop out at the chain stay). I have a newer Specialized Frame that they replaced it with as a warranty item. I am much happier with the new frame. Much more stable, especially on descents. The Festina was very, very twitchy,-not a good frame for a very nervous descender like myself)
 

donk

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Three flat ride yesterday.

First one, pumped up my tires in the morning, drove out to the start of the ride, the tire was soft. Changed it at the car. Road about 30K, ran over a staple or some other little piece of steel. Pulled it out of the tire (tough it was only a sliver), changed the tube, as we were pumping it up the valve ripped off. Luckily we were at a gas station, bought some crazy glue, cut the bad valve tube into pieces, and used them to patch the tube. Just got back to the car as the tire started flatting. Total ride 50-60k of rolling hills

The annoying thing was that, another group of cyclists stopped to chat with us and no one offered me a tube, even though there was 6-8 of them and they all looked to have tubes. If I was in a group and saw a guy patching a tube with crazy glue and another tube, I think I'd offer him a tube. I have stop when driving to see if a person needed help or a lift.

saturday was a mountain bike ride in a city park that is all up or down. Chutes and ladders.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,937
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39
donk said:
, ran over a staple or some other little piece of steel.

Same thing got me on my ride home from work the week before last...and of course being the well prepared commuter I am, I had no spare nor any tools. Walked to the nearest bike shop (20 minutes) and paid $14 for the fix.

On the bright side, Mrs. Tranplanner is now hooked on the bike bug. She borrowed my bike to ride to the video store and liked it so much the next day she borrowed the sis-in-law's bike and we rode down to the Islands for a picnic and back (30+km).

Now I have to get her a bike of her own, but I'm not complaining.
 

PlannerByDay

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24
Well the wife and I just got back from the DALMAC bike tour. We logged on 330 miles over 4 day. That is the most I have ever ridden in my life.

The weather was great, despite the headwind on day 2 which was our "Short" day (77miles).

If anyone live in or near michigan and likes to ride this is a great event. They are very organized and put a lot of thought into making it a great event. You can even ride over the Mackinac Bridge if you are brave enough.:-c
 

donk

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Jeff said:
Flats come in 3's matey. you should know that.:-D

Good news is that on my mtb ride, I found a nearly new pump and a set of tire levers.

Welcome back.
 

JNA

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These Urban Cyclists Know When to Fold 'Em
Headline and Article from the NY Times Sunday September 11, 2005
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/11/business/yourmoney/11cycle.html?oref=login

Story about commuters and their folding bicyles.

Highlights:
"Small wheels are part of the magic that lets collapsible bikes compress into such neat packages, .... The wheels on the Brompton, for example, have a 16-inch diameter, in contrast to the 27 inches typical of a standard bicycle.

For many residents of small apartments, the appeal of collapsible bikes is their minimal storage requirements, along with the ease of folding them for elevators or stairwells.
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