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NEVERENDING ♾️ The NEVERENDING Bicycle Thread

donk

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I guy I know, not well enough to call a friend, but well enough to eat dinner with and go drinking with just tested positive for EPO. Not a good day, the High Performance meetings I am going to this week will be really interesting now.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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26,964
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71
London commuters opting to pedal to work
Terror attacks get wheels turning

Headline and Article from USA Today Wednesday September 21, 2005
http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/life/20050921/d_bicyclecity21.art.htm

Highlights:

It's not quite Amsterdam or Copenhagen, where commuting by bike is the norm, but London is quickly becoming a major cycling city. Much of the shift is a direct result of the bombings....

Still, only 2% of Londoners cycle to work, compared with 20% in Copenhagen and 28% in Amsterdam. London Mayor Ken Livingstone, a bicycle enthusiast, wants to increase cycling 80% by 2010.

Adam Coffman of the Cyclists Touring Club, Britain's largest cycling advocacy group, says the real turning point came in February 2003 when London implemented the Congestion Charge, a $9.25-a-day day fee to drive a car into downtown. The aim: to reduce traffic and pollution. The fee increased to $14.80 on July 4. Rising gas prices — now at the equivalent of $7 a gallon — and a nationwide battle against obesity also have spurred commuters to switch to bikes or walk, Coffman says.

The jump has jammed bike paths during rush hour. Veteran cyclists bemoan newer riders, who they say lack skills and etiquette.

... bike insurance, a standard purchase for bike owners. In central London, insurance costs about $75 a year for a $600 bike.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,461
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29
FINALLY seem to have found the proper pedal position. It was a simple cleat problem that I couldn't solve before. Hurrah!
 

PlannerByDay

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1,825
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24
donk said:
I guy I know, not well enough to call a friend, but well enough to eat dinner with and go drinking with just tested positive for EPO. Not a good day, the High Performance meetings I am going to this week will be really interesting now.

And why was this person taking, let alone being tested?

Is this guy a professional cyclists?

In you opinion did the EPO make him a better athlete?
 

donk

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31
PlannerByDay said:
And why was this person taking, let alone being tested?

Is this guy a professional cyclists?

In you opinion did the EPO make him a better athlete?

1) Yes he is a professional (multiple NORBA podiums/Pan Am Games medalist)

2) Testing - all liscensed cyclists and especially national team atheltes are eligible for out of competiton testing. Atletes with federal "carding" money even more so. same reasons why Lance is tested all of the time.

3) Results, who know if as he claims he is a recent user trying to regain form after injury or if his results the past 10 years are clean.

4) He says he took it to get back to his pre injury form (hit by a truck 2 years ago).
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
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21,195
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60
JNA said:
SNIP
Adam Coffman of the Cyclists Touring Club, Britain's largest cycling advocacy group, says the real turning point came in February 2003 when London implemented the Congestion Charge, a $9.25-a-day day fee to drive a car into downtown. The aim: to reduce traffic and pollution. The fee increased to $14.80 on July 4. Rising gas prices — now at the equivalent of $7 a gallon — and a nationwide battle against obesity also have spurred commuters to switch to bikes or walk, Coffman says.

Do you think that something like that could work in the United States? Or do you think that the car driven society would not stand for this. I would love to see something like this happen, but in many places that do not have an active public transportation system, and climate conditions (snow) might prohibit it at times.

I personally like the idea!
 

TheBostonian

Cyburbian
Messages
30
Points
2
michaelskis said:
Do you think that something like that could work in the United States? Or do you think that the car driven society would not stand for this. I would love to see something like this happen, but in many places that do not have an active public transportation system, and climate conditions (snow) might prohibit it at times.

I personally like the idea!

The idea has been discussed for Boston.
 

PlannerByDay

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1,825
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24
michaelskis said:
Do you think that something like that could work in the United States? Or do you think that the car driven society would not stand for this. I would love to see something like this happen, but in many places that do not have an active public transportation system, and climate conditions (snow) might prohibit it at times.

I personally like the idea!

The issues wasl also talked about on the show "Chicago Tonight" on WTTW Channel 11, on Monday September 26th. Archives of the show should be available in a week or so.
 

jsk1983

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2,552
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26
michaelskis said:
Do you think that something like that could work in the United States? Or do you think that the car driven society would not stand for this. I would love to see something like this happen, but in many places that do not have an active public transportation system, and climate conditions (snow) might prohibit it at times.

I personally like the idea!

I know the George Washington Bridge connecting Manhattan with NJ has a $6 or $7 toll. I'm not sure though about the other bridges/tunnels. Of course New York City is not the rest of the country.
 

Boru

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Messages
235
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9
Am I being taken for a ride.

Ladies and Gents, I need some adivce. Simple advice, and nothing to get to worried over, but I hate the feeling that someone is exploiting my lack of bicyle maintenance knowledge.

The crank which attaches the pedal to the turning/chain mechanism has become loose and fallen off my bike. The last time this happened I was charged for a replacement crank. The fellow in the bicycle shop said that replacing or tightening the bolt holding the crank in place would only be a temporary measure. Is this true? Having looked at the bolt etc, it seems that a new bolt would do the trick. Seeing as how a fair few of ye have rather pricey bikes and seem to do all of your own repairs, I thought I may as well be forewarned by the biped bicycle battalion.

Thanks.
 

donk

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Boru said:
Ladies and Gents, I need some adivce. Simple advice, and nothing to get to worried over, but I hate the feeling that someone is exploiting my lack of bicyle maintenance knowledge.

The crank which attaches the pedal to the turning/chain mechanism has become loose and fallen off my bike. The last time this happened I was charged for a replacement crank. The fellow in the bicycle shop said that replacing or tightening the bolt holding the crank in place would only be a temporary measure. Is this true? Having looked at the bolt etc, it seems that a new bolt would do the trick. Seeing as how a fair few of ye have rather pricey bikes and seem to do all of your own repairs, I thought I may as well be forewarned by the biped bicycle battalion.

Thanks.

It depends.

If the crank arm is "wallowed" (ie the taper is stretched because the crank rocked on the bottom bracket spindle) then yes you will need a new crank arm. If you caught it early, then you should be fine with replaceing the the bolt. If the crank arm is wallowed and you are cheap, then use some pop can shims on the tapers. They'll last for awile until you can afford to buy a new crank arm. Also, there is typically no need to buy a complete crankset, you can buy single arms.

You should also double check to see if it is a bolt or a nut holding it on. Bolts work better, most bikeuse bolts vs nuts.
 

Boru

Cyburbian
Messages
235
Points
9
Thank you Donk. It was wobbling for a fair while, so more than likely I will have to get a new crank. Pop-can shims. That sounds like Zen and the art of push-bike maintenance to me! :) Thanks once again.
 

JNA

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26,964
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71
From the NY Times Sunday Magazine; October 2, 2005

P.R. Cycle
How a bike-rights event turned into a notorious brand.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/02/magazine/02consumed.html?oref=login

Highlights:
Part of the conceit of Critical Mass is that it is not organized or led by anyone in particular; it simply happens.

Critical Mass can be seen as a method of encouraging biking in the city, a declaration of the need to make New York safer for cyclists, a statement about reclaiming public space or a way to draw attention to the environmental impact of car culture.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
Cyclist/Worker Paradise Found - Me Defect Soon!

EAST-ASIA-INTEL.COM
Tuesday, October 11, 2005
North Korea, which has boasted ballistic missiles and nuclear arms, has begun producing the country's first home-built bicycles, China's Xinhua news agency said in a dispatch from Pyongyang.

The factory, a joint venture with China, opened in Pyongyang on Oct. 7 with a number of senior officials from the two countries attending. They included Paek Hyun-Bong, chairman of the North's Committee for the Promotion of External Economic Cooperation, and Wu Donghe, Chinese ambassador to Pyongyang.

Energy-starved North Korea needs some 7 million bicycles, officials said. "The bicycle was the most important thing, because the buses and trams stopped running due to energy shortages," said one North Korean who recently defected to the South. "But bicycles are a luxury, so most people walk," he said.

Under an agreement made last November, Chinese investors provide materials, equipment and cash to have a 51-percent stake in the $650,000 Pyongjin Bicycle Joint Venture, with North Korea holding the remaining with its labor force. The two sides would jointly run the factory for 20 years......

http://www.worldtribune.com/worldtribune/05/front2453655.050694444.html
 

dobopoq

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1,002
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23
I've been shopping for a commuter bike with internal hub gears for about 4 months now.

My preferences are:

_internal hub gears 7-speed+ (but can't justify cost of a Rohloff 14-speed)
_full chain guard
_rear wheel rack
_fenders w/mudflaps
_front and rear v-brakes
_reasonably lightweight
_upright riding position: cruiser handlebars or somewhat angled
_bell
_front and rear dynamo/generator lights

I saw donk's link to ANT bikes which are nice, but kinda pricey. I liked a lot of the European/Dutch style utility bikes like Gazelle, Azor, Pashley, Kronan and Henry Work Cycles too. But because of trade rules, these are hard to come by in the U.S. Many of these are made of steel and so are quite heavy as well. Now I'm about ready to drop about $850-$1000 on the Breezer Uptown 8. Here's a page on it: http://www.breezerbikes.com/bike_details.cfm?bikeType=town&frame=u&bike=uptown

What do you all think?
It's a pretty new company, based in Sausalito, CA. The bike has the new Shimano 8-speed internal hub, which has a 305% gear range. I'll mainly use it for commuting, errands and socializing around Portland, with the occaisional weekend ride out to the woods with tent, sleeping bag and hopefully some booty else (as I continue to develop a circle of friends - I'm new in PDX) . Just wanted to ask the throbbing brian if there are any issues to watch out for. I'm 5'10"1/2 so I'm probably big enough for a large diamond frame, but I kinda prefer the step-through/u-frame (it better suits my dobopoqian disdain for gender roles, i.e. dudes - diamond frame, chicks - chick frame) - it's just that it may be a little small. The Uptown 8 is only 33.5 pounds with the works in terms of accessories. Any advice on buying saddle bags vs. metal panniers? Any cyburians own a Breezer or have a bike with internal hub gears or know someone who does with any useful experience to share?
 
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PlannerByDay

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Subpoena to testify

On August 23rd, during a routine bike ride with the Chain Gang myself and another rider were nearly hit by a motorist and another rider in our group was actually struck by the same motorist.

Today, nearly 2 1/2 months later I got a call from the prosecuting attorney asking me for a statement and asking me if I would be willing to be a witness to the incident during the trial. Without hesitation I said, "YES."

After I agreed the prosecuting attorney told me the defendant was a Methodist Minister and was trying to use that to get sympathy. That isn’t working on me buddy, all the more reason to make an example out of this guy.

The Attorney went on to tell me he (the attorney) is an avid cyclist as well and that he has no intention in making a plea agreement with the defendant, and will taking the case to court.

Trial is set for December but he thinks it will be rescheduled for sometime next year.

I’ll keep you posted.
 

donk

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dobopoq said:
Now I'm about ready to drop about $850-$1000 on the Breezer Uptown 8. Here's a page on it: http://www.breezerbikes.com/bike_details.cfm?bikeType=town&frame=u&bike=uptown

What do you all think?
It's a pretty new company, based in Sausalito, CA. The bike has the new Shimano 8-speed internal hub, which has a 305% gear range. I'll mainly use it for commuting, errands and socializing around Portland, with the occaisional weekend ride out to the woods with tent, sleeping bag and hopefully some booty else (as I continue to develop a circle of friends - I'm new in PDX) . Just wanted to ask the throbbing brian if there are any issues to watch out for. I'm 5'10"1/2 so I'm probably big enough for a large diamond frame, but I kinda prefer the step-through/u-frame (it better suits my dobopoqian disdain for gender roles, i.e. dudes - diamond frame, chicks - chick frame) - it's just that it may be a little small. The Uptown 8 is only 33.5 pounds with the works in terms of accessories. Any advice on buying saddle bags vs. metal panniers? Any cyburians own a Breezer or have a bike with internal hub gears or know someone who does with any useful experience to share?

On Breezers, it is owned/marketed by Joe Breeze a long time Mountain Bike icon (founder of one of the first mtb companies).

No idea about internal hubs, but they are less efficient, and have no idea how they last.

On panniers, good bags will be better than cages and bags.

Fenders, lots of options.

You might also want to look at the rivendell bikes page for ideas about touring fit and associated pieces.

http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/
 

el Guapo

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PlannerByDay said:
On August 23rd, during a routine bike ride with the Chain Gang myself and another rider were nearly hit by a motorist and another rider in our group was actually struck by the same motorist.

Today, nearly 2 1/2 months later I got a call from the prosecuting attorney asking me for a statement and asking me if I would be willing to be a witness to the incident during the trial. Without hesitation I said, "YES."

After I agreed the prosecuting attorney told me the defendant was a Methodist Minister and was trying to use that to get sympathy. That isn’t working on me buddy, all the more reason to make an example out of this guy.

The Attorney went on to tell me he (the attorney) is an avid cyclist as well and that he has no intention in making a plea agreement with the defendant, and will taking the case to court.

Trial is set for December but he thinks it will be rescheduled for sometime next year.

I’ll keep you posted.


A-freaken-MEN! About time I heard some good news about a prosecutor who thinks bicyclists and pedestrians are human beings worthy of life. :)

Thank for the post.
 

dobopoq

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donk said:
On Breezers, it is owned/marketed by Joe Breeze a long time Mountain Bike icon (founder of one of the first mtb companies).

No idea about internal hubs, but they are less efficient, and have no idea how they last.

On panniers, good bags will be better than cages and bags.

Fenders, lots of options.

You might also want to look at the rivendell bikes page for ideas about touring fit and associated pieces.

http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/
I just now saw your post. Thanks for your input donk. I'm gonna wait till the large U-frames come out in the spring. I've heard hubs are maybe 5-10% less efficient than derailleurs. But they are far more reliable and require no maintenance for years at a time. No problems with slipped chains. And there's no redundant gears or extreme chain angles resulting from high outer gears used while on the small inner crank chain ring, which can cause clipping and reduce chain life.

How about a front suspension fork? Necessary and useful, or just unneeded weight? Will it reduce the responsiveness too much? I might do an occaisional road trip out of the city, but don't really intend to ever ride much on unpaved surfaces. Anyone have experience with a front suspension fork?

And yes, it's really important that you hold reckless drivers accountable PlannerByDay. I look forward to hearing how the case turns out.
 

donk

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dobopoq said:
How about a front suspension fork? Necessary and useful, or just unneeded weight? Will it reduce the responsiveness too much? I might do an occaisional road trip out of the city, but don't really intend to ever ride much on unpaved surfaces. Anyone have experience with a front suspension fork?

.

For your needs a suspension fork will do nothing . The cost for a good fork outways the benefit for touring/commuting. I'd look at getting a bike that will fit 35-38 mm tires. They'll provide enough cush for you.
 

dobopoq

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donk said:
For your needs a suspension fork will do nothing . The cost for a good fork outways the benefit for touring/commuting. I'd look at getting a bike that will fit 35-38 mm tires. They'll provide enough cush for you.

Cool. I guess you're saying a good suspension fork would add a lot to the cost, beyong my needs. The Breezer Uptown 8 has 660 x 38 mm tires. Besides, the average street in Portland is in much better shape than in many cities. Baltimore has tons of potholes and broken glass. It's good business for the mechanics though.

Are streets pretty smooth in T.O.? With that kind of cold, I'm sure some serious funds must go to repair potholes.
 

BKM

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Opinion Question:

What is the opinion of you more "urban" cyclists out there about riding on sidewalks. I know it's illegal, but too often I see this happen-even in towns/neighborhoods where the street automotive traffic is not that heavy (or fast).

Is this another example of annoying things cyclists do that piss off the rest of the world?

On another note: I need to buy a roof rack for my car. There are no gutters/bars on this car. I assume all the major manufacturers make racks for gutterless car roofs? Should I just stick with the big brands-what are your preferred brands?
 

donk

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BKM said:
Opinion Question:

What is the opinion of you more "urban" cyclists out there about riding on sidewalks. I know it's illegal, but too often I see this happen-even in towns/neighborhoods where the street automotive traffic is not that heavy (or fast).

Is this another example of annoying things cyclists do that piss off the rest of the world?

On another note: I need to buy a roof rack for my car. There are no gutters/bars on this car. I assume all the major manufacturers make racks for gutterless car roofs? Should I just stick with the big brands-what are your preferred brands?

On sidewalks, never do it. It is bad on so many different levels. I think this is one spot were we'll all agree. Only time I do it is as I am hopping off the bike and I tens to already be coasting on one pedal, getting ready to walk.

On bike racks, yes they make them for gutterless cars. I think the current suggested course of action is to buy Thule Rails and the new yakima trays that fit both round and square rails . I have a yakima rack system that is going on 6 years old and still looks new and functions perfectly. They are really a life time investment, and they are expensive - rails/clamps and 2 trays were around $800.

Another option I would consider is some of the trailer hitch mounted racks. Roof racks suck gas, especially with bikes on them. When I take my rack off for the winter, gas milage improves 10-15%.
 

BKM

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donk said:
Another option I would consider is some of the trailer hitch mounted racks. Roof racks suck gas, especially with bikes on them. When I take my rack off for the winter, gas milage improves 10-15%.

Since my car already "sucks gas" that's probably a no-go for me.

I think I'm going to be doing the good ol take both wheels off and wrap the bike in a cloth to avoid getting grease on the upholstery route.

This is the only negative to my....NEW CAR.....:-$ :-D The WRX was a wagon. The new Subie is a sedan.
 

Wulf9

Member
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22
Good chains

I have been having shift problems (auto shifting, skipping gears,etc). Local bike shop finally replaced the chain with high quality (Shimano I think) chain. All problems disappeared. Morale, use good chains.
 

dobopoq

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BKM said:
Since my car already "sucks gas" that's probably a no-go for me.

I think I'm going to be doing the good ol take both wheels off and wrap the bike in a cloth to avoid getting grease on the upholstery route.

This is the only negative to my....NEW CAR.....:-$ :-D The WRX was a wagon. The new Subie is a sedan.

What about a bumper mounted rear rack? I see them all the time on buses here, and on SUV's but perhaps your car is too narrow or low to the ground.
 

donk

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Wulf9 said:
I have been having shift problems (auto shifting, skipping gears,etc). Local bike shop finally replaced the chain with high quality (Shimano I think) chain. All problems disappeared. Morale, use good chains.

If things keep skipping, may be time for a new drivetrain (cassette/chainrings). I prefer sram/sachs chains to shimano as they are easier to fix on the road (no special pin) and are less expensive.

The other problem with roof racks is wind noise, they can be pretty loud, especcally as your door trim ages.
 

BKM

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dobopoq said:
What about a bumper mounted rear rack? I see them all the time on buses here, and on SUV's but perhaps your car is too narrow or low to the ground.

I'll look at this option. They're not as "cool" and can scratch the paint. There is also a spoiler issue that may interfere.

Still, I'm short (5'7" at most), so the roof racks are a challenge for me, anyway.

Maybe I'll look at hitch racks. That would avoid the problem of paint scratching and not create the gas mileage robbing wind tunnel effect of the roof rack.

Edit: Oops. That's what you were recommending. I was thinking you meant the old trunk mounted racks which do have the drawbacks I mentioned.
 

donk

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Here are a few pictures of one tough Japanese tourist I passed this week in the Yukon. He was riding from anchorage to whitehorse to skagway to take a ferry to juneau and then eventually back to anchorage. All self supported and in the winter.

japantour.jpg


Taken from the warm cab of the truck

japanese_tourist.jpg


Taken at a scenic outlook.

We passed him on our way to skagway, then passed him again on our way back to whitehorse. It looked like he was going to get caught in the mountains for the night as he did not stop in carcross, the last town before skagway (60 km away)
 

BKM

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Wulf9 said:
I have been having shift problems (auto shifting, skipping gears,etc). Local bike shop finally replaced the chain with high quality (Shimano I think) chain. All problems disappeared. Morale, use good chains.

Except the damn Campi chains cost $59. :-c
 

zman

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34
Looking to "hop back on the horse" soon. I have been lacking in my cycling, basically since I moved into my new house this past June.

A possible winter ride on Saturday maybe? We'll see the weather and how the old bike is holding up.
 

BKM

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It looks like riding will have to wait until Spring here. :-c Which generally means February-but the storms are just lined up one after another across the Pacific Ocean. A break today and tomorrow, thank the lord, but heavy, heavy rain on Friday and Saturday :-@

On another, related note. I am a car nut, but I am becoming more conflicted about it. A conflict I can't resolve unless I could afford to move to a more interesting central city (stuck out here in the exurbs without a car would be HELL.) This is an interesting essay (semi-political) on some of the transportation issues. A car driven society is an antisocial, libertarian one? http://www.monbiot.com/archives/2005/12/20/the-anti-social-bastards-in-our-midst/
 

The Irish One

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I think we SoCal drivers (aka cagers;-) ) become a bit provincial behind the wheel. I'm fortunate in that despite living in the suburbs, I can ride my bike everyday for work, shopping and school. While doing my commuting by bike I do get the impression that I'm an "obstacle" and "a nuisance to be wished away" from the unnecessary use of horns and lack of respect for my space on the road.
 

zman

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The Irish One said:
I think we SoCal drivers (aka cagers;-) ) become a bit provincial behind the wheel. I'm fortunate in that despite living in the suburbs, I can ride my bike everyday for work, shopping and school. While doing my commuting by bike I do get the impression that I'm an "obstacle" and "a nuisance to be wished away" from the unnecessary use of horns and lack of respect for my space on the road.

I was thinking of this on my drive in. I drove a potential commute route (the first leg being 20 miles) and there was only about 7 miles of it along roads with no bike lanes. Hopefully at the time I leave, there will be little traffic, but I do live in farm truck central and the attitudes towards bikers here are less than progressive. :-|

But I will be in some good shape though!
 

ike

Cyburbian
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26
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2
Skipping and shifting problems? Ride a fixed gear like a real man! 48 x 17 baby!
 

JNA

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71
AP Takes a Backroads U.S. Bicycle Journey

Headline and Article from the AP Wire:
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationw...40608.story?coll=sns-ap-nationworld-headlines

Highlights:
In this land of congested suburbs, clogged highways and city clatter, it's possible to go from Washington, D.C., to the Pacific on roads less traveled.

MISSOURI
Katy Trail on the outskirts of St. Louis. The nation's longest rail-to-trail route, at 225 miles, it demands no steeper climbing than the trains of past centuries could manage. The limestone path turns the bicycle white; much of the four-day leg snakes between the Missouri River and steep bluffs.

Katy gets its name from the old Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad, or M-K-T, and tiny towns along the way are named after railroad executives. One exception is Mokane, Mo., drawn from the initials for Missouri, Kansas and Nebraska

KANSAS
People of the High Plains ought to have as many words for wind as the Inuit have for snow.

It rules. It fools with you all day.

COLORADO
Colorado offers many features not encountered since the East. Among them: coffee chains, suburban sprawl, wide shoulders and Democrats.
 

The Irish One

Member
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2,266
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25
Ah, touring is the best. I scheduled a tour down the coast of CA next month, from San Francisco to San Diego, but health problems have put me out of that for the moment. Thankfully, I can still ride all I want around town.:)
 

JNA

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Downhill Unicycling

Article from the NY Times, Sunday Dec. 25, 2005
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/25/b...tml?ex=1136523600&en=126f53bb77cac361&ei=5070

Highlights:
Mountain unicycles - or munis, in the sport's lingo - are instantly recognizable by their thick tires, and the Freeride is no exception; its tire is three inches wide and studded with rubber grips.

... sold 2,000 to 3,000 Freerides since the product's introduction in 1998.

Many of his sales have come through Unicycle.com, a site that specializes in all manner of one-wheeled machines, from munis to unicycles designed for beginners. The Freeride is one of the site's most expensive products: the 2005 base model costs $520, and that's without a brake. (Adding a hydraulic brake increases the price by $179.)
 

el Guapo

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My LBS is going under!!! The other LBS is money-grubbing-evil. Whoa is me. :-@ :-{ :-|
 

The District

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375
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12
Fixed gear and singlespeed bikes

Anyone else here into fixed gear or singlespeed bicycles? I am building one, perhaps two, right now. I think they are beautiful.

Don't know what I'm talking about? Google.
 

mendelman

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Essentially a track bike? I've never ridden one. It would be interesting to have to stop by slowing your pedaling......kinda like engine braking.
 

zman

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The District said:
Anyone else here into fixed gear or singlespeed bicycles? I am building one, perhaps two, right now. I think they are beautiful.

Don't know what I'm talking about? Google.

You wanna build me a road bike while you're at it? I'll drive the hour down to pick it up! ;)
 

SkeLeton

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Single speed road bikes? I can't see why that would be a good idea... specially when a hill comes to mind... ouch...or am I misunderstanding here?
mendelman said:
Essentially a track bike? I've never ridden one. It would be interesting to have to stop by slowing your pedaling......kinda like engine braking.
Apparently I am... but I don't understand how the gear would help you regulate the rpms of your pedals. Anybody care to explain? Also how could a gear make you slow down if you slower your pedaling?
 
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