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NEVERENDING ♾️ The NEVERENDING Bicycle Thread

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,266
Points
25
don't forget what amgens biggest seller is as you watch this, EPO.

Wow, I had no idea.

TV Schedule
Prologue
Sunday February 19 ESPN2 10:00pm (PST)

Stage 1
Monday February 20 ESPN2 11:00pm (PST)

Stage 2
Tuesday February 21 ESPN2 10:00pm (PST)

Stage 3
Wednesday February 22 ESPN2 10:00pm (PST)

Stage 4
Thursday February 23 ESPN2 10:00pm (PST)

Stage 5
Friday February 24 ESPN2 10:00pm (PST)

Stage 6
Saturday February 25 ESPN2 10:00pm (PST)

Stage 7
Sunday February 26 ESPN2 10:00pm (PST)
 
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zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,244
Points
33
Building a bike.

First off:
Many Thanks to The District :-D for setting me up with a cherry road bike frame to build something off of last weekend!

Second: Bottom Brackets and a Crank.

While I must paint this frame first, I want to begin building it into a decent road bike. I was thinking of beginning with the bottom bracket and crank. How does one choose? I want something basic and fairly inexpensive. How do i size my frame so that I get one to fit?

Also, if there is any other advise anyone could offer for this entire process, that would be great!:-D :-$

P.S. Use this code NMTCH3 for 10% off your order at Bike Nashbar
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
Since you are in Colorado, it may be worth taking a course at

http://www.bbinstitute.com/

You may also want to see if any shops offer a "park tool school" near you.

As for BB / cranks, unless you are fully committed to a bike stand($100+) and the tools (bb tool, crank puller, allen keys - total $75 or so) it is cheaper and easier to let a shop do it. plus if you are painting it then the threads will need to be chased and the shell faced. For paint consider

http://www.spectrumpowderworks.com/

If it is F/F only and depending on the quality of the F/F, your best bet would be to try and pick up a 105 closeout group/build kit off of the web. If the F/F are of a lower end, your best bet is to buy a new low end bike.



zmanPLAN said:
First off:
Many Thanks to The District :-D for setting me up with a cherry road bike frame to build something off of last weekend!

Second: Bottom Brackets and a Crank.

While I must paint this frame first, I want to begin building it into a decent road bike. I was thinking of beginning with the bottom bracket and crank. How does one choose? I want something basic and fairly inexpensive. How do i size my frame so that I get one to fit?

Also, if there is any other advise anyone could offer for this entire process, that would be great!:-D :-$
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,244
Points
33
donk said:
Since you are in Colorado, it may be worth taking a course at

http://www.bbinstitute.com/

You may also want to see if any shops offer a "park tool school" near you.

As for BB / cranks, unless you are fully committed to a bike stand($100+) and the tools (bb tool, crank puller, allen keys - total $75 or so) it is cheaper and easier to let a shop do it. plus if you are painting it then the threads will need to be chased and the shell faced. For paint consider

http://www.spectrumpowderworks.com/

If it is F/F only and depending on the quality of the F/F, your best bet would be to try and pick up a 105 closeout group/build kit off of the web. If the F/F are of a lower end, your best bet is to buy a new low end bike.

I was thinking of a basic class, but I have been renting books and I am somewhat technically inclined and everything seems do-able.
I have a stand on the way, thanks to a good deal from Nashbar and after I get the frame painted, I will invest in some tools and get to work on piecing it together. The District told me of a bike shop in Denver that will paint frames for less than Specturm, although I have heard good things about Spectrum; and I may (famous last words) try it my self as well. :-c

Donk, by a "105 Group" do you mean Shimano?
What is the difference between a 170mm, 172.5mm and 175mm crank? Do those sizes have anything to do with the size of the frame I am mounting it to?
 
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donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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31
By 105, I mean shimano 105. You may even want to go with sora with 105 shifters.

If the frame is of a decent quality, I would not try repainting it myself unless you are an accomplished painter. What brand is it?

Crank length is a factor of height and inseam. The rule of thumb, the taller you are the longer your cranks, with 170's and 172.5 being "normal". I ride 175's and would like to go shorter to improve my spin, vs mash. If you are curious about crank length and fit here is the guru/quack take on it- depends on who you talk to

http://www.zinncycles.com/cranks.aspx

With BB the main area of concern is spindle length (based on the crank being used), bb shell width, from your frame (usually 68) and threading (english vs italian vs french vs swiss, most "modern" frames are english, but check)


zmanPLAN said:
I was thinking of a basic class, but I have been renting books and I am somewhat technically inclined and everything seems do-able.
I have a stand on the way, thanks to a good deal from Nashbar and after I get the frame painted, I will invest in some tools and get to work on piecing it together. The District told me of a bike shop in Denver that will paint frames for less than Specturm, although I have heard good things about Spectrum; and I may (famous last words) try it my self as well. :-c

Donk, by a "105 Group" do you mean Shimano?
What is the difference between a 170mm, 172.5mm and 175mm crank? Do those sizes have anything to do with the size of the frame I am mounting it to?
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,825
Points
24
Tomorrow a local (kinda) bike shop is having their "End of Winter Party" This is a great time with good cheap food, beer, and unbelivealbe deals on gear. Additionally they have a special guest who talks with folks and makes a brief presentation .

This year it is Keith Bontrager. A lesser know person than in years past but I'm sure it will be cool.

Last year it was Bob Roll, energetic announcer from the Tour and the year b-4 it was Greg Lemond.

If you are around the Michigan area check it out. It will be a blast.

Team Active in Battle Creek,Michigan
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,225
Points
25
My cruiser can kick your road bike's ass.

Friday and Yesterday I did a round-trip ride to Milwaukee and back. It's right about 100 miles each way (you can shave it down to around 90 though by being smart). Anyway, I was the fourth of about 20 people to pull into the bar in Milwaukee.

I was the only one not on a road bike or a recumbant.



I was on a 30 year old Schwinn Racer with a 3 speed sturmey archer hub. :h:
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
Points
31
You are either really toughh, or it is flat, or the people with you were really slow. That sturmey archer hub is a bomb proff collectible.

I was out for my walk today, and froze. I could not believe the number of people riding bikes, at least it was dry.


jordanb said:
Friday and Yesterday I did a round-trip ride to Milwaukee and back. It's right about 100 miles each way (you can shave it down to around 90 though by being smart). Anyway, I was the fourth of about 20 people to pull into the bar in Milwaukee.

I was the only one not on a road bike or a recumbant.



I was on a 30 year old Schwinn Racer with a 3 speed sturmey archer hub. :h:
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,225
Points
25
Well, I got there in 8.5 hours, that works out to something like 11mph. It wasn't as flat as Chicago but it wasn't foothills either. Wisconsion and Lake County mostly slope gently up, then down. The main thing is that I didn't stop often. I had a slower cruising speed than most people but when you don't stop at every gas station for more cheetos, it adds up. ;)

But my point is though that I think there's something seriously misplaced with the obsession with roadies we have in this country. Lord knows road bikes aren't the most comfortable things you can find. They're not the fastest, or most versitle. And the fact that a guy can beat a bunch of people on roadies on a very long ride with an antique cruiser that weighs about six times what a modern roadie weighs says something about the realitive importance of the equipment and the person on it.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,673
Points
70
Seen in USA TODAY:
Still shredding after all these years
By Sal Ruibal

There have been mountain bikes almost as long as there have been bikes, but the distinctly American version with fat, knobby tires and a straight handlebar was born in the late 1970s.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the first mass-produced mountain bike, the Specialized Stumpjumper. Since the introduction of the “Stumpy” in 1981, more than 100 million mountain bikes have been sold around the world.

You can still buy a Stumpjumper today — at less than the original cost. The 1981 price was $750, or $1,537 when adjusted for 25 years of inflation. The least expensive 2006 model with a front shock absorber is listed at $1,400. The top-of-the-line S-Works Stumpjumper FSR, however, will set you back a whopping $7,100.

Nobody knows Stumpjumpers like Ned Overend. He won the first-ever mountain bike world championship in 1990 on a carbon-fiber prototype. In 2004, at age 48, he placed seventh at the U.S. national championships on a Stumpjumper.

“The bike has changed a lot over the years,” says Overend, who also won the 1998 and 1999 Xterra Mountain Bike Triathlon world championships. “In 1990, we couldn't have imagined the bikes we ride today.”

The first “superlight” Stumpjumper weighed just under 30 pounds, was made of steel and had 15 gears and no shock absorbers.

Most of today's mountain bikes are 10 pounds lighter and have a front shock and 27 gears. A FSR Stumpjumper, with disc brakes and “smart” dual shocks that analyze the terrain, weighs 26 pounds.

“Back then we didn't think about history,” Overend says. “Time flies when you're having fun.”
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
jordanb said:
Well, I got there in 8.5 hours, that works out to something like 11mph. It wasn't as flat as Chicago but it wasn't foothills either. Wisconsion and Lake County mostly slope gently up, then down. The main thing is that I didn't stop often. I had a slower cruising speed than most people but when you don't stop at every gas station for more cheetos, it adds up. ;)

But my point is though that I think there's something seriously misplaced with the obsession with roadies we have in this country. Lord knows road bikes aren't the most comfortable things you can find. They're not the fastest, or most versitle. And the fact that a guy can beat a bunch of people on roadies on a very long ride with an antique cruiser that weighs about six times what a modern roadie weighs says something about the realitive importance of the equipment and the person on it.


Let me get this straight, you're claiming you did a double century on a 3-speed and beat the majority of the other people who did the same double century and you were on a 30 year old Schwinn. Ummm...yeah. ;-) :-x
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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6,461
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29
jordanb said:
Well, I got there in 8.5 hours, that works out to something like 11mph. It wasn't as flat as Chicago but it wasn't foothills either. Wisconsion and Lake County mostly slope gently up, then down. The main thing is that I didn't stop often. I had a slower cruising speed than most people but when you don't stop at every gas station for more cheetos, it adds up. ;)

But my point is though that I think there's something seriously misplaced with the obsession with roadies we have in this country. Lord knows road bikes aren't the most comfortable things you can find. They're not the fastest, or most versitle. And the fact that a guy can beat a bunch of people on roadies on a very long ride with an antique cruiser that weighs about six times what a modern roadie weighs says something about the realitive importance of the equipment and the person on it.

Yeah, my buddy in the next cubicle still obsesses about cutting 1/2 pound off his cluster and all that. Maybe the 25 pounds around his waist are more important :p

We won;t talk about my corpulent self. :-$ (As I lick my lips after a delicious poppy seed roll spread with awesome French cheese!)
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,448
Points
25
I was out here yesterday - what a fantastic place!

In June 1998 the Wellington City Council set aside 200 hectares of retired farmland southwest of the city for a mountain bike park. [Why Makara Peak was chosen] Development of the Makara Peak Mountain Bike Park began almost immediately with volunteer work parties planting trees and cutting new tracks. In the first year six tracks were built and 4,000 native seedlings planted. A big effort was also put into controlling possums and goats, which were destroying the pockets of native forest in the Park.

Thanks to the efforts of hundreds of volunteers, restoration of the native forest on Makara Peak is progressing well and many new tracks are being built. To ensure the park reaches it’s full potential, the ‘Makara Peak Mountain Bike Park Supporters’ has been established with a mission to create a world class mountain bike park, with dual use tracks for all levels of rider, in a restored native forest.
http://www.mountainbike.co.nz/places/makarapeak/supporters.html
Unfortunately, I got separated from my friends and got lost and spent 3 hours trying to get out... I may tell the whole story after the bruises go down. Yes, I fell off. More than once. Ouch :-$
 

donk

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31
Did my first "real" ride of the year yesterday. A bit chilly so only out for an hour, mostly to check what has to be done to the bike.
 

BKM

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6,461
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29
Got sucked into a much longer ride (50 miles) than I had anticipated yesterday. Spring is definitely here in Northern California, so it was well into the 60s (but windy). Northern California is lush and beautiful this time of year, and we rode through a canyon with a quite active little stream running through it.

We brought along a neighbor of my friend, who did ok considering he had no experience riding (it was his fourth ride since he had started riding again), but he really started dragging toward the end. I was feeling a little tired, and I didn't think it was fair to just drop him, so I slowed down and pulled him home via an easier route than my tandem-borne friends were doing. They tried waiting for us, and we thought something had happened to them when we beat them home (after a refueling stop at a coffee shop, so we went out in his truck to sweep the route. Cell phones are your friend, when they're not sitting at home.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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15,531
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60
Well I got a trainer for my bike recently and just need to but the slick on the wheel to use it. I live in an apartment, so I need the slick to reduce the noise and potential distrubances to the neighbors.

Though, it will be riding season real soon, so use of the trainer will really commence late next fall.
 

donk

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31
ouch :(

Not a good weekend for me, at leat I am getting my $500 ride out of the way early in teh season, my shifter stopped working. Will need to buy a new pair (why can't you just buy one?). Since my bike is 8 speed, I'll probably have to upgrade to 9 or 10 speed, so I'll need a new chain, cassette, chainrings, rear derailleur.

I think it might be easier and cheaper to just buy a new bike. Can buy a new Kona cross bike for $1200 with better and newer parts than I have on mine.

Good news would be that I now have a city bike that I don't have to worry or care about at all, just take off my good stem, seatpost, and saddle.
 

BKM

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6,461
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29
Another weekend with no riding :( We had rain on 25 days in the month of March. I could have ridden on Saturday, but the weather was so unstable I was uncertain what was going to happen weather-wise.

And no, I'm not nearly devoted enough to ride in the rain. Can't think of anything more miserable. :-D
 

michiganplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
472
Points
14
Interval training....interval training

1 day of interval training and I feel like I accomplished more and made my body better than whe whole week of "normal" riding all last week.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
I did 20 miles Saturday with my first full touring load - front & rear panniers - tent, sleeping bag & goodies. My new tripple really works well for the hills, but the top gear is easily maxed out on a downhill. Oh, well better too slow downhill than a knee breaker on the hills. My son jumped off of his Raleigh racing bike and on to the touring bike and was stunned by the weight of a loaded tourer. Getting on his Raleigh for a mile was like Barry Bonds must feel like. Wow!

Now I have to work up to 75 miles a day with the load and then I'm going on a tour.
 

jordanb

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Messages
3,225
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25
BKM said:
Another weekend with no riding :( We had rain on 25 days in the month of March. I could have ridden on Saturday, but the weather was so unstable I was uncertain what was going to happen weather-wise.

And no, I'm not nearly devoted enough to ride in the rain. Can't think of anything more miserable. :-D

You just need the right equipment. My Bianchi has a disc break on the back so breaking isn't impared much (except that I have to use the back instead of the front break, which you should do anyway in the rain) and the fenders keep road crap off my ass. I have a cheap poncho so the ends of my arms and legs still get a little moist. I have a nice military poncho back at my parent's house that I'm going to nab over Easter. And I might go for some rain pants as well.

It seems like a tour isn't really something you "train" for, you just go and bite the bullet through the pain that sets in after the first couple of days and goes away a few days later. Most people I know who've gone on really long (month+) tours only push around 50 miles a day anyway.

I'm planning on doing a tour that's planned out of here every year that I believe is usually around 300-350 miles over a long weekend. The big first planning meeting is next Monday so we'll figure out the general shape of it then. My current project is sewing canvas panniers and I hope to have some big enough to tour with built and waterpoofed by then.
 

BKM

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jordanb said:
You just need the right equipment. My Bianchi has a disc break on the back so breaking isn't impared much (except that I have to use the back instead of the front break, which you should do anyway in the rain) and the fenders keep road crap off my ass. I have a cheap poncho so the ends of my arms and legs still get a little moist. I have a nice military poncho back at my parent's house that I'm going to nab over Easter. And I might go for some rain pants as well..

Ah, but there are simply other things that I would rather do on a drizzly day than ride my bike. I went on a city hike (downtown, up to Nob Hill, up to Russian Hill I love San Francisco) for several hours in San Francisco with my basenji. My bicycle is not my primary transportation-at least not yet (Peak Oil and $8/gallon gasoline??)
 

Wulf9

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22
BKM said:
Another weekend with no riding :( We had rain on 25 days in the month of March. I could have ridden on Saturday, but the weather was so unstable I was uncertain what was going to happen weather-wise.

Same rain here. I usually ride to work if there is a break in the rain (and walk if it starts raining again). I was able to ride to work and home for lunch. It rained about 10, but that's not during the commute times.

Short commutes are great.
 

BKM

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29
Wulf9 said:
Same rain here. I usually ride to work if there is a break in the rain (and walk if it starts raining again). I was able to ride to work and home for lunch. It rained about 10, but that's not during the commute times.

Short commutes are great.


Continously drizzling here. I was amazed to see, when I drove up to see my sister on Grizzly Peak Blvd. in Oakland, that there were people riding in Sunday's hard drizzle. One can dress for it (as jordanb notes), but Chicago doesn't have twisty, two lane roads with blind curves, slippery mudflows across the roadway, and cliffs to drop off. They are more dedicated than I, I guess. :)
 

SkeLeton

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26
Hey, just a small question.... Is it normal that bike suspension sounds like a dry thump? if not, any way to fix it? Considering that I have never done maintenance to them specifically, could this bring problems ahead? (I bet)

I know many of the bike fans here will want to kill me for not doing much maintenance to my bike... :p
 

njm

Cyburbian
Messages
322
Points
11
I would just like to make my mandatory shout-out for cycling-to-work

(or more accurately busing to work and cycling home)

*imagines joy of weaving through traffic*
 

donk

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31
SkeLeton said:
Hey, just a small question.... Is it normal that bike suspension sounds like a dry thump? if not, any way to fix it? Considering that I have never done maintenance to them specifically, could this bring problems ahead? (I bet)

If it is a high qulaity suspension product (rock shox, manitou marz, fox) take it to a good shop and get the oil changed, the bushings checked and get it pumped back up (assuming it is an air fork may only need to get pumped up). If it is a cheap (ie no name/off brand) fork then it is probably toast. Same for rear shocks. Clunking means that the shock is bottoming
 

jordanb

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25
SkeLeton said:
Hey, just a small question.... Is it normal that bike suspension sounds like a dry thump? if not, any way to fix it? Considering that I have never done maintenance to them specifically, could this bring problems ahead? (I bet)

It sounds like it is toast. For big bucks you can get it replaced, but I'd recommend dropping the suspension altogether (although that'll require either jimmying something together or getting a new frame). For the vast majority of bicyclists, the only purpose the suspension serves is to replace the springy saddle that disappeared because road warriors thought it was too heavy. I'd recommend getting a solid steel frame and a springed saddle. Springs also require zero maintenance.

I know many of the bike fans here will want to kill me for not doing much maintenance to my bike... :p

Bikes should be built such that little maintenance is necessary. They are not complicated machines and could be built to be very durable. Unfortunatly, that is not the case because people are willing to buy touchy, fragile crap (and spend good money on it) and consequently, the bike industry is out of control.

EDIT: If this is a front suspension all you need is a new fork, of course, not a whole new frame. If it's back suspension, you're SOL.
 

BKM

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jordanb said:
Bikes should be built such that little maintenance is necessary. They are not complicated machines and could be built to be very durable. Unfortunatly, that is not the case because people are willing to buy touchy, fragile crap (and spend good money on it) and consequently, the bike industry is out of control.
.

HERESY, MAN! HERESY! I NEED my superlight parts, including the $75 chains with each link drilled so that it is lighter. THAT will enable me to climb hills faster (The 35 pounds of chocolate, bread, and cheese arond the gut and clogging my arteries have nothing to do at all, I tell you, with sluggish climbing).
 

donk

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31
jordanb said:
EDIT: If this is a front suspension all you need is a new fork, of course, not a whole new frame. If it's back suspension, you're SOL.

Not necessarily true, it depends on teh quality of the aprts and their availability. The "big" shock guys do have replacemetn parts and shocks for most bikes. Now if it a cheap bike (less than $500USD), then you are further ahead to pitch it.
 

SkeLeton

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26
jordanb said:
Bikes should be built such that little maintenance is necessary. They are not complicated machines and could be built to be very durable. Unfortunatly, that is not the case because people are willing to buy touchy, fragile crap (and spend good money on it) and consequently, the bike industry is out of control.

EDIT: If this is a front suspension all you need is a new fork, of course, not a whole new frame. If it's back suspension, you're SOL.

Yes, it's the front suspension (I don't have rear suspension :p) and it's stock from the original bike... so who knows what brand it is...
Well I think I can hold it for now, since I don't think I'll have much chances of riding in the future (midterms, winter, smog crisis, etc) So I think I'll leave it as it is until spring... :p

Heh, I also need to replace the grips on the handle bar... they're quite broken right now. :p

Actually, in the past I never felt any effect of the front suspension, but now of course I see some effect... Would it be dangerous if I left it as it is? (considering that the only times that it actually serves it's purpose is when going down to the street where curb cuts aren't there...)
 

donk

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skel

I would strongly advise that if the fork compresses and stays compressed to replace it. It may cause a crash if the tire hits teh fork crown. You can typically find a cheap rigid fork for $30 USD.
 

SkeLeton

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Well after some investigation... it seems that it wasn't the shocks... but rather that the front wheel was a bit loose :wow: :-c Fixed that and it seems to be gone, now I need some tweaking on the front brakes that are a bit too squeaky... :p
 

donk

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Skel, there must have been bad fork kharma going around, I need to get mine fixed. A damping rod is seized (OUCH$$$$$). The good news is that I was able to find a shifter for not too much money for my road bike.

Road 40Km today, all urban exploring. Gotta like having Easter Monday off.
 

donk

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jordanb said:
Ok, I've overhauled a lot of axles but....

What the hell is that?

^o) ^o) ^o)

It is part of a suspension fork, it controls the rebound. The rebound is adjustable and can be between fast mine slow, mine is seized so it has none (fast). Think of a bouncing ball, not good.
 

jordanb

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3,225
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25
Well, I've decided that the Bianchi Milano was not a good purchase because new American bikes suck. So I'm selling it on ebay. I'm going to replace it with a 1974 Chicago Schwinn (lug welded the way God intended) frame decked out with a SRAM spectra 7 hub, etc. Cause if it ain't steel it ain't real.

Here's the auction for the aluminum can: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7244058633&rd=1&sspagename=STRK:MESE:IT&rd=1

I was very worried about not posting a reserve considering how much money I have in it but all my ebaying friends told me that that's the way you sell it. It's up to $258 after the first day and a half with like 50 people watching it so it looks like it might pay off (but if it goes for less than $400 I would have been ahead stripping the parts off and throwing the frame in a dumpster :-o ).

Of course I told a little fib about it being too small (although it is just barely large enough) but I didn't want to give my rant about new bikes as that would have probably decreased enthusiasm.
 

donk

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jordanb said:
Of course I told a little fib about it being too small (although it is just barely large enough) but I didn't want to give my rant about new bikes as that would have probably decreased enthusiasm.

What you don't like celeste? ;)

Bianchi's ar italina/tawainese not american. For an american bike that will suit your needs check out

www.antbikemike.com
http://www.sycip.com/bikes_cruiser.html

For a marketing company chack out
www.somafab.com or
surlybikes.com

For the modern retrogrouch

www.rivendellbicycles.com

There are lots more that will meet your needs, and be better than the milano, but will also cost you $$$.
 

jordanb

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I can't look at any of those links because they're all websensed. :-@ I'll give them a look when I get home.

But I did a lot of research into cruiser/utility bikes in the US before I bought the Milano (Breezer, Giant, etc) and they all seem to have the same deficiencies. They were all aluminum, they were all designed starting with a Mountian Bike frame. The Breezers came with a rack and gyro lights but they were very cheap.

With the Schwinn I can buy each part to be exactly what I want and I'm expecting the project to cost about $500 total (so I'm really hoping that the Bianchi goes for more than that).

The only reason why I decided to buy a new bike in the first place was reliability because at the time I'd not done a ton of bike maintence, but now that I've completly torn down and rebuilt my Schwinn Racer I'm confident that I can keep any well-built bike (and well-built is an understatement for the Chicago Schwinns!) in good working order.

And Bianchi may be an Italian company but the Milano was speced by California-based Bianchi USA. It doesn't hold a candle to good European bikes like Gazelle or Kronan.
 

Jaxspra

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I will probably irritate you guys here that ride a lot, as I know nothing about bikes. I do know that I enjoy riding and its something that the boys and I can do and I still get my cardio in for the day instead of hitting the gym. Last night I rode about 14 miles at a local park on the paved trails. The bike I am riding is my moms bike and I think it is too small for me; I know my neck/shoulder hurt after riding.
Anyway, can you guys give me some tips on what to be looking for when going to buy a new bike? I am not spending a lot of money on one, I just want to know a few things that you guys find important, a few of the things I really need to be looking for. I will be riding on paved trails, pretty flat surfaces.
 

jordanb

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I think a Beach Cruiser sounds to be exactly what you need. If you’re riding with your children I imagine you’re going pretty slow anyway, so a single speed will suit you fine. Beach Cruisers allow for a comfortable, upright riding position, smooth ride, stable handling, and simple controls.

Where to get one is a bit tricky. If you were in Chicago I’d say go to Working Bikes and pick up one vintage for $60-80 and then take it to a bike shop to get the bearings repacked (most WB bikes have dried-out bearings) for another $60-80. You’ll have a very nice, very reliable and fun bike for less than $200.

Without WB as an option you’re stuck looking at yardsales and whatnot. In any case though an old bike needs to have its bearings repacked so that’s a cost you’ll just have to pay.

I know they still make beach cruisers new, but you’ll likely have to get it off of the internet as most retailers won’t have them. I know Giant makes something similar but ISTR it has a lot of bells and whistles and is very expensive ($8-900).

I would avoid big boxes (especially WalSAMS LAW) because those bikes are made very very very cheaply. They’re designed with the understanding that the average bike sold in America is ridden 75miles, factory to landfill, and most won’t last much longer than that. While it may seem like a bargain to get a bike for $80-$100 it won’t be in the long run unless you only ride it a few times, and expect to get a new one every year.

If you can’t find a beach cruiser, or an old cruiser of any sort, head towards the Mountain Bikes and Hybrids. You may think you need a road bike because, you know, you’re riding on the road, but modern roadbikes are not made at all ergonomic and are very painful for the causal rider (infact they can even cause dangerous conditions for an experienced riders like numb wrists). The trick to avoiding pain is sitting upright. Get on the bike and see how you feel. Are you relaxed or are you having to strain in places? Don’t let a bike salesperson tell you to “get used to” how things feel. If it’s not comfortable don’t buy the bike.
 

Tide

Cyburbian
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2,719
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mendelman said:
[ot]
Dude, I think you're in the wrong 'neverending' thread.;)[/ot]

See could only see out of one eye this morning and only saw the words neverending...
Mods feel free to delete or move.
 

Jaxspra

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Messages
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24
jordanb said:
I think a Beach Cruiser sounds to be exactly what you need. If you’re riding with your children I imagine you’re going pretty slow anyway, so a single speed will suit you fine. Beach Cruisers allow for a comfortable, upright riding position, smooth ride, stable handling, and simple controls.

Where to get one is a bit tricky. If you were in Chicago I’d say go to Working Bikes and pick up one vintage for $60-80 and then take it to a bike shop to get the bearings repacked (most WB bikes have dried-out bearings) for another $60-80. You’ll have a very nice, very reliable and fun bike for less than $200.

Without WB as an option you’re stuck looking at yardsales and whatnot. In any case though an old bike needs to have its bearings repacked so that’s a cost you’ll just have to pay.

I know they still make beach cruisers new, but you’ll likely have to get it off of the internet as most retailers won’t have them. I know Giant makes something similar but ISTR it has a lot of bells and whistles and is very expensive ($8-900).

I would avoid big boxes (especially WalSAMS LAW) because those bikes are made very very very cheaply. They’re designed with the understanding that the average bike sold in America is ridden 75miles, factory to landfill, and most won’t last much longer than that. While it may seem like a bargain to get a bike for $80-$100 it won’t be in the long run unless you only ride it a few times, and expect to get a new one every year.

If you can’t find a beach cruiser, or an old cruiser of any sort, head towards the Mountain Bikes and Hybrids. You may think you need a road bike because, you know, you’re riding on the road, but modern roadbikes are not made at all ergonomic and are very painful for the causal rider (infact they can even cause dangerous conditions for an experienced riders like numb wrists). The trick to avoiding pain is sitting upright. Get on the bike and see how you feel. Are you relaxed or are you having to strain in places? Don’t let a bike salesperson tell you to “get used to” how things feel. If it’s not comfortable don’t buy the bike.
THANKS!! The bike I rode last night and have been for a few days is from Wally world (I think). We have a bike shop here on Main Street that rents bikes to riders on the KATY and I know they sell the used bikes after a year or two. I think I'll start there and see what I can find. My neck and shoulders are so sore from the way I sit on that bike, I don't think I can ride it again for any distance at all.
My youngest just learned to ride without training wheels so I foresee a LOT of bike riding this summer and want to make sure I am comfortable.
One more question, are thier different types of seats that are more comfortable? Is that just something I need to figure out with each bike??
 

jordanb

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3,225
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25
A bike shop that deals in used bikes sounds like exactly what you need. They tend to not bother with the crap (big box bikes are seen as having basically no resale value to people who are in the know) so there's a greater probability you'll get good quality.

Just be clear to them what you want and don't let them give you something uncomfortable. Bike shops in America sell lots of bikes that a normal person would consider to be a tortue device so they end up with a bit of a skewed sense of reality. I'd say "beach cruiser" and see what they say. Explain that you don't want to strain your back or neck, you just want to be able to roll along comfortably at fairly low speeds with your small children.

About seats:

As a general rule, wider seats are designed to be more comfortable for upright riding, and narrower seats are designed to prevent chafing of the legs for riders who are leaning way over and really hugging the seat with their legs.

But in either case girls tend to have a lot more space between their legs anyway and don't have as much chaffing issues so a wider seat is better. Also girls are more likely to have a wide space between their "sit bones" (the parts of the pelvis that jut downward) meaning there's a danger that a narrower seat can "miss" the sit bones and be very uncomfortable.

So in short, go for a wider saddle.

If you get an older bike that has a springed saddle, treasure it. Springs used to be standard issue but now they are very rare equipment, and they're a dream to ride on.
 

donk

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jaxspra My advice is going to be similar to jordanb's on a few points and way different on a few others.

1) Definitely go to a bike shop. Tell them what you are planning on doing with the bike and what your budget is. They will be able to size you up and explain to you if the "pain" you felt is normal. If you have pain in your neck and shoulders it may mean you were either too stretched out, the bike is too long or the stem was too low. If a bike is too long, but the standover is good, try a shorter stem. If the stem is too low, either raise it, change to one with more rise and also work on your core strength and flexibility.

2) Some discomfort when first riding is normal, it is just your body getting used to a new position/use of muscles. Now if the pain can be prevented and you still are in a good position to ride the bike, then do it, otherwise be careful. Shifting weight from your arms to your bum can cause different issues, many less pleasant.

3) Saddles, are a totally personal thing. I have ridden both wider and narrow saddles and even on my city bike, have a saddle that is pretty narrow. For your uses a mid width one will probably be right. Avoid gel as it just squishes into parts it is not supposed to get into.

4) Be careful about garage sales, if you don't know much about bikes, and are not mechanically inclined, buying bikes that you know need work can be a total pain and cost more. Also becareful of Dept store bikes as they have non standard parts. Many bike shops up here are now refusing to work on them and don't typically stock parts.

jordanb for your search check out kona, they have a few commuter style bikes that are made of steel and are pretty well spec'd. For a used bike, if I was you I'd be looking for an early 90's bianchi grizzly project x or an early 90's diamonmd back. Both of these mtb use 700c wheels.
 

jordanb

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Of course there's a big difference from muscle pain and from pain from strain. I think she knows the difference between the two. And neck pain sounds like strain to me.

Pain from strain is only normal from riding a bike in the way that pain from strain from sitting in the front row at the movie theatre is normal. In both cases the REAL cause is bad design, but everyone just takes it as normal because bad design is so widespread.

donk said:
For an american bike that will suit your needs check out

Ok I looked at those links and, yes, you're right. It is PHYSICALLY POSSIBLE to get a good bike in the US, but can you see that there's a difference between specially ordering a bike from a botique frame maker in Boston or San Francisco for a couple of Gs, and walking into any bike store in Holland, putting 400 euros on the table, and walking out with a Gazelle?

Anyway, my "search" is over. It happened a couple of weeks ago, in a warehouse full of old bicycles. I found the frame I wanted in a big pile and climbed into it to get it out. I bashed up my hand a little but it was worth it. The frame is sitting in my kitchen right now. I painted it "hunter green" last weekend:

http://hafd.org/~jordanb/junk/schwinn1.JPG

For it I'm going to buy:
A SRAM Spectra 7 planetary gear hub /w drum break
A Sturmey-Archer X-FDD Dynamo/drum break front hub
A Brooks B66 saddle

I'm still considering my options WRT the lights and the tires. I like the Schwables except the riding surface was a little too narrow. I'm going to look at some other Schwable models and some Conties before making my decision.
 

donk

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jordanb said:
Ok I looked at those links and, yes, you're right. It is PHYSICALLY POSSIBLE to get a good bike in the US, but can you see that there's a difference between specially ordering a bike from a botique frame maker in Boston or San Francisco for a couple of Gs, and walking into any bike store in Holland, putting 400 euros on the table, and walking out with a Gazelle?

There are people in Minneapolis http://www.curtgoodrich.com/index.html and Montana http://strongframes.com/ that would be able to help you out.

There is a certain pleasure associated with riding a bike that you can actually call and speak to the person who built it for you. Remember that these guys are skilled craftsmen in a dying trade, especially if they build with lugs.
 
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