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NEVERENDING ♾️ The NEVERENDING Bicycle Thread

donk

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jordanb said:
I thought I'd post pictures of my new bicycle.

What do the headset mounted shift levers do now?

Also, I'd rbuild up something like that, if I could find one in a good size and that was well made in the first place. We did not have schwinn here, CCM's don't compare.
 
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cololi

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1,183
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22
Maybe this goes into the accidents thread, but I got hit by a bicyclist yesterday while crossing the street, at a 4 way stop. The car stopped at the stop sign, but the bike, passing on the drivers left hand side of a two lan road, ran through it. Luckily, he hit me instead of my 2 year old son who was walking with me. It knocked me down and banged me up a bit. The biker was far worse than me. The funny part of the whole thing is that his 2 riding buddies tried to put the blame on me. Luckily for me, there was a police officer at the starbucks across the street. I believe the biker got a ticket for running a stop sign.

I typically do not bike on the road (mainly mountain biking for me) but do ride to and from the trailhead on the street. I blow through stop signs all the time on my bike. I really should start abiding by the rules of the road.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
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5,986
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31
jordanb
I have to say that is one sweet looking bike you have built. It is well thought out and I can see how it would fit your life well . Nicely done. May you have many happy miles with it. :)
 
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jmac

Cyburbian
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234
Points
9
Spent Saturday and Sunday rerouting a mountain bike trail in a local park. I was part of a group of about 25 volunteers, and we built about 850 feet of new trail. But it's Wednesday, and I'm still sore! This is what happens when hand tools are pushed on a desk jockey. :-D

It was worth it... the new trail is sweeeeeet.

Okay... so if a hotel charges 14% tax (as in the APA conference hotels in Philly), is that ON TOP of the 6% State tax, or is the 6% tax in the 14%? I'm already trying to put together a budget for next year. :)

Impressively proactive!

For Philly, I think 14% is the total lodging tax rate... 6% PA sales tax, 1% Philadelphia sales tax, and 7% Philadelphia lodging tax. I don't want to be held responsible for your budget deficits, though. ;)
 
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donk

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Spent Saturday and Sunday rerouting a mountain bike trail in a local park. I was part of a group of about 25 volunteers, and we built about 850 feet of new trail. But it's Wednesday, and I'm still sore! This is what happens when hand tools are pushed on a desk jockey. :-D

It was worth it... the new trail is sweeeeeet.

I've been working on a pretty major reroute. We've built nearly 2500 ft over 2 weekends. All IMBA approved bench cuts and really fun to ride both up and down.

I know what you mean about being soft from office work.

Next spring we are going to do some closing and another serious reroute.
 

donk

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We also bench cut a nice, flowy trail which replaces a nasty, eroding fall-line trail.

Our trailbuilding was done as part of an IMBA (International Mountain Bicycling Assoc.) Trail Care Crew visit. For those of you who are not familiar with the program, two IMBA crews travel around the country and teach sustainable trailbuilding methods to land managers and IMBA-affiliated clubs. It was an excellent class, and I think it will continue to improve the relationship between our local advocacy club and the park management.

Interestingly, one of our instructors is a former planner from south Florida. The public meeting experience was evident in his presentation style. ;-)

IMBA also publishes several books of trail design guidelines. They tend to be focused on singletrack-style hiking and biking trails, but are probably useful for most types of recreational trail design. The IMBA Trail Care Crew website has more info if you are interested.

We should probably move this conversation over to the never ending bike thread.

http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showthread.php?t=8283&page=29&highlight=neverending

I assume it was Nat and his wife that helped out.
 

martini

Cyburbian
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678
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I've been working on a pretty major reroute. We've built nearly 2500 ft over 2 weekends. All IMBA approved bench cuts and really fun to ride both up and down.

I know what you mean about being soft from office work.

Next spring we are going to do some closing and another serious reroute.

Seems there lots of trail bulding stuff happening 'round here! Three weeks ago, I(I meaning the group I work with...) had 70+ volunteers show up to build 2.25 miles of trail in a County park not to far from my town. Since that day, there has been a constant stream of hikers and bikers on that trail, and the county can't wait for us to build more! We have 800+ acres in thsi park, and another 800+ in a more remote park. I love this stuff!
 

jmac

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234
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9
Seems there lots of trail bulding stuff happening 'round here! Three weeks ago, I(I meaning the group I work with...) had 70+ volunteers show up to build 2.25 miles of trail in a County park not to far from my town. Since that day, there has been a constant stream of hikers and bikers on that trail, and the county can't wait for us to build more! We have 800+ acres in thsi park, and another 800+ in a more remote park. I love this stuff!

It's really great to hear this stuff. Sounds like you guys are doing some good work too. Trail access has been such an issue for years, but it seems like we are finally becoming a legitimate user group in many places.

Locally, the park manager is pretty pleased with the work that has been done, and we are already talking building some missing links in the trail network. We will also be helping the park management officially name the trails, assign skiing-style difficulty ratings, and officially sign everything, which should make the place much more approachable for beginners. Just a few years ago, there was talk of banning mountain bikes from the park, so it is nice to see things trending this way.
 

JNA

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My fair city newspaper's sunday travel article -

Arkansas trail puts Mountain View on Bike Map

AP Wire article link: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06307/734727-37.stm

Highlights:
The International Mountain Biking Association recently named the trail system one of 37 epic rides.

But the abundance of wildlife also makes the National Forest lands popular among hunters.

"We strongly suggest that people do wear hunter orange," Furr said, referring to orange-colored safety vests and clothing. "We post that on the bulletin boards at the trailheads, so that people are aware."

Q. Have you worn/would you wear hunter orange when on a mtn bike ride ?
 

jmac

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234
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Q. Have you worn/would you wear hunter orange when on a mtn bike ride ?
I keep an old blaze orange safety vest from work wrapped around my hydration pack during hunting season... not sure if it actually makes me more visible, but I feel safer. My fiancee's mom bought me a sweet bright orange bike jersey (is that a sign she is ok with the wedding?? ;-) ). I definitely feel more visible in that thing.

Also, hunting is not allowed on Sundays here in PA, so we usually just ride in the city parks during the week and save the state forests and gamelands for Sunday.
 

Jeff

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In PA you're liable to get shot if caught on a trail durning gun season for deer. Regardless of orange or not.

MTBs spook the deer for miles!
 

zman

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Getting a FREE road bike this weekend. Finally, I can start shaving my legs and wearing obscenely colored shirts and funny socks!

All it needs are pedals and a new chain.
 

zman

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So, like I mentioned above, my new roadie needs pedals.

This will be the first road bike I have owned and I was wondering whether I should get pedals that clip into their own shoes (I would use the proper term, but that escapes me now) or should I get normal pedals that can be used with regular sneakers?

What would the Planning Bikeheads receommend? I plan on riding the roads on the plains, with rolling hills and long flat stretches to start out (once the snow and ice melts away...)
 

donk

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So, like I mentioned above, my new roadie needs pedals.

This will be the first road bike I have owned and I was wondering whether I should get pedals that clip into their own shoes (I would use the proper term, but that escapes me now) or should I get normal pedals that can be used with regular sneakers?

What would the Planning Bikeheads receommend? I plan on riding the roads on the plains, with rolling hills and long flat stretches to start out (once the snow and ice melts away...)


It is actually conter intuitive, they are called clipless pedals. I can not reccomend getting a set enough. I would suggest that as a peerson just starting out, and looking to possibly at mountain bike pedals and shoes. The main reason is that they are easier to walk in should you use the bike for commuting and running errands.

As for brands of shoes, I am partial to sidi.
For mtb pedals, time
For road pedals look
 

jmac

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So, like I mentioned above, my new roadie needs pedals.

zman -

I totally agree with donk's advice. Mountain clipless pedals and shoes are the most practical way to go if you might be getting off the bike and walking around during a ride. You can even get mountain pedals that have a platform surrounding the attachment mechanism, which would allow you to wear regular sneakers for short rides.

That said, I use regular flat pedals or pedals with a cage/strap on my town bike - they are more comfortable with sneakers, which I'll wear if I'm going to the store or doing other errands.

My favorite pedals are the Crank Brothers Eggbeater series... they are relatively cheap and have been reliable. I used the standard Eggbeaters on my mountain and road bikes for the past four years, but the "Mallet" has a nice platform around it and is pretty popular with some of my mountain biking buddies. I've also heard good things about the Time pedals but haven't tried them.

Bikes are fun. Welcome to the club, fellow Planning Bikehead. :)
 

cololi

Cyburbian
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Z: I agree with the previous, avoid the clipless pedals if you get on and off alot. If you do go with clipless, make sure you practice getting your feet out of the pedals before you jump on the bike. I know many a people who didn't do this the first time they used them and ended up with the rubber side of the bike up at the first stop light. While funny for witnesses, not so funny when you are the one on the ground.

On a side note: I am starting a new job next week that will make it much easier for me to bike to work (20 minute bike ride on striped and signed roadways, with regular maintenance!) I'll use my mt bike with my slick tires to start, but may look into a roadie if I find myself biking more than a couple days a week.
 

zman

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Thanks, Dudes. For all the advise. Some spokeheads at work also said to go the mountain bike pedal/shoe route at first. I'll have to try both out and see.

This has also got me thinking about reconverting my current mountain bike into a "grubby local beer run machine". I may have to take the slicks off of them (I used them for commuting) and return to some beefy tires. This is the first year of snow on the flat lands of Colorado where things do not melt, so I may have to ride around my small town in the snow. (Looking for something to combat cabin fever this weekend as more snow is on the way and one can only drink so much!). ;)

When the weather cooperates and I can get to Denver, I'll post a photo of the bike.

Also, if The District is still reading the forums, I am beginning work on the road frame I bought from you a while back. This new bike will be one to ride as I learn to paint and build an awesome bike.
 

JNA

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70
Biker Chic
A blue-collar profession attains hipster status — and so does its paraphernalia.
Headline from article in NY Times Sunday Magazine

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/14/magazine/14wwln_consumed.t.html?ref=magazine

Highlights:
Advertising Age recently included a messenger-bag company called Timbuk2 in its “Marketing 50” list of up-and-coming brands. With sales to messengers “in the bag,” the magazine observed, Timbuk2 has lately “expanded into an urban-lifestyle brand,” with about $20 million in sales a year and growing quickly. The company’s roots go back to 1989, when a San Francisco bike messenger named Rob Honeycutt started making bags and selling them through local bike shops. When this started to look like a real business, he changed the original name — Scumbags — got some financial backing and opened a manufacturing facility in the Mission District. The brand sold made-to-order bags via the Internet and had a solid cult following by the time Honeycutt sold his stake to new investors and left in 2002.

Are they really that big and popular ?
Do you have one?

Their website: http://www.timbuk2.com/tb2/retail/catalog.htm
 

donk

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Are they really that big and popular ?
Do you have one?

I've had mine for about 5 years. I find it pretty useful for work. geobandito has one too.

Only thing I wish for mine, is the new option of a handle for carrying.

When I get a lap top, I will be getting the lap top sleeve.

As for overall popularity, I see many different brands around and considering crumpler has concept stores I am thinking others are banking on their popularity.

They are much more useful and convenient than a backpack for everyday use and don't look too school book bag like.
 

Jeff

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4,159
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27
i have one, have had it a few years. not the best for riding with compared to others around. Reload bags are really cool, made in Philly, and perfect for riding. But they are like $200.
 

martini

Cyburbian
Messages
678
Points
19
I've got three messenger bags, each a bit different than the other. I one for work since its perfect for a laptop(not that I have one...yet), and has a handle in addition to the sling. The other two I use for errands around town. B double E double R un's, mailing packages and grocery runs are the most common. I use them to pack for weekend trips as well. Actually, I can pack for up to a week in one of them.

I have two Crumplers, and can heartily suggest them. Nice big zippers, generous compartments, and comfortable on the back. They do ride better loaded down though, I have noticed that. I never use the chest straps that they come with. They're all too short (I'm kinda barrel chested).
 

jmac

Cyburbian
Messages
234
Points
9
I've had a Timbuk2 bag for a few years... not sure how much hipster cred it has because I bought it off a clearance rack at EMS and it has a rather large EMS logo on the flap. Still, it has definitely been worth the $25 I paid for it. It holds four growlers for the beer runs to the friendly local microbrewery. That's all I ask.

I've been lusting for a RELoad or BaileyWorks bag as well, but I just don't ride enough to justify that purchase.
 

martini

Cyburbian
Messages
678
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19
Not sure if this has been posted yet,but a while back I found a link that's kinda cool from a planner/mapper/dreamer kinda perspective. http://www.routeslip.com/ is it. It uses the Googlemaps interface to design, log and store any road route you can dream up. It gives elevation profile of your ride too. Good for showing how tough you are, I guess. ;-) While I do ride the loops I've created, I don't use the site for training log or anything like that, though it is offered. Go crazy!
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,244
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33
On ESPN Classic Channel - The movie American Flyers (1985)

http://imdb.com/title/tt0088707/

I had seen the first part of it a couple months ago, also on Classic. Last night I picked up right where I left off.
A little dose of 80s cheese, but kept me interested nonetheless.

Pretty cool shots of the old Coors Classic (I think the "Hell in the West" was filmed during the Coors race itself.
Saw many seens of Golden, CO and the mountains that I have been to in person.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
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4,159
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27
New Whip

whip.jpg



Cyfac Le Mythique CLM
Custom TT Geometry
ITM Build Kit
Zipp 999 Wheelset
DA/Ultegra 10 speed Drive Train
 

martini

Cyburbian
Messages
678
Points
19
Dang jeff. Thanks for not getting a Cervelo. Too many of those damned things r'ound these parts.

Gonna cut off that steer tube at all? or is it a forehead rest?:D
 

donk

Cyburbian
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31
You sure your position is going to be UCI legal?

It looks a bit "supermanish" to me.

Better check the rules. (1.3.023 ;)
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,159
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27
Nothing is getting cut until we do the wind tunnel next week at MIT.
 

JNA

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26,674
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70
HEADLINE: Bringing the Mountain Bike to Metropolis
http://travel.nytimes.com/2007/04/27/travel/escapes/27adventurer.html

HIGHLIGHTS:
Across the country, in cities from Philadelphia to Santa Fe, mountain biking is gaining as a viable urban activity. Extensive trail networks designated for the knobby-tire crowd, some many miles in length, now wind through parks like Theodore Wirth in Minneapolis and Powhite Park in Richmond, Va., or under freeway viaducts in places like Seattle.

About 15 major metropolitan areas have legitimized mountain biking in urban parks or on municipal land, including Pittsburgh; Austin, Tex.; Louisville, Ky.; Tucson; Salt Lake City; suburban Los Angeles; and Vancouver, British Columbia.

In 2009 when the APA Conference is in Minneapolis would this be the site of a mobile workshop ?

I knew about Louisville, KY.
 

martini

Cyburbian
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678
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19
In 2009 when the APA Conference is in Minneapolis would this be the site of a mobile workshop ?

I would say so! Mpls has great trails all around the City. Theo Wirth is only one. Hell, I'd probably go to ride more than go the APA thingy.:-$
 

JNA

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26,674
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70
Headline and Article from USA TODAY:

10 great places to take the kids on a bike ride
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/destinations/10great/2007-04-26-places-to-ride-bikes_N.htm

:) Another plug for the Minneapolis-St. Paul area -

Battle Creek Regional Park
This large county park, with nearly 8 miles of single track, arcs along its namesake tributary of the Mississippi River. "The riding can be challenging, but there are also mellower, wide dirt paths, and you can even ride from downtown St. Paul along a paved bike path that runs directly to the park," Frank says. 651-748-2500; www.co.ramsey.mn.us/parks
 

JNA

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Bicycle makers shift gears for Spandex-free set

Headline and article from the Louisville Courier-Journal:

http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070506/BUSINESS/705060418/1003

HIGHLIGHT:
Sales have been flat for the past 12 years, and companies are looking to woo new riders,.... The new automatic-shifting products could increase the number of the nation's cyclists, ...., by cutting out the intimidation factor.


Would you buy a Trek LIME or any other makers auto shifter ?
 

kjel

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Would you buy a Trek LIME or any other makers auto shifter ?

Funny this would be posted up as I was talking the other day with my friend who is an avid bike rider as he was recounting a conversation he had with the local bike shop owner who was complaining his sales were flat. His suggestion to the owner is that he needed to capitalize on the casual riders who don't want to pay high $$ to tootle around town or ride on the weekends.

I myself would buy such a bike because its of a higher quality than the disposables from the big box and the price doesn't break the bank to such a degree that I would feel sorry for not being out riding it all the time. Besides, I'm not interested in riding a bike up a mountain or playing speed demon on the roads.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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One of my biggest regrets about leaving Idaho: I left my Trek mtn. bike behind. It wouldn't fit in the pick-up. I'm sure the adulteress sold the bike. Beoutch. I miss that bike.

I'm gonna start shopping.
 

SkeLeton

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One of my biggest regrets about leaving Idaho: I left my Trek mtn. bike behind. It wouldn't fit in the pick-up. I'm sure the adulteress sold the bike. Beoutch. I miss that bike.

I'm gonna start shopping.

Not that a mountain bike would be of much use in Florida... :p ;)

I don't know if an automatic shifting bike would be a great idea... I mean come on... what's the problem with pressing a little handle to go up or down a shift... it's not like you had to do any clutching or anything....
 

Richmond Jake

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Not that a mountain bike would be of much use in Florida... :p ;)

I don't know if an automatic shifting bike would be a great idea... I mean come on... what's the problem with pressing a little handle to go up or down a shift... it's not like you had to do any clutching or anything....
[ot]Have I told you to go fvck off lately?
If not, I should do it more often.


Go ahead, report me. It's been a bad and intense weekend.[/ot]
 

martini

Cyburbian
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678
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Coming from a bikers perspective, the LIME's shift kinda funny. But riding them sure is fun! I agree that bike shops need to refocus on the casual rider if they want to succeed. With $3+ dollar gas, I bet shops will start seeing more folks looking for simple, easy to ride bikes. The LIME and the Electra line are just that.

Skel - FL actually has pretty difficult trails to ride. Granted, not much for hills, but techincal stuff abounds.

donk - SS 4eva!
 

Maister

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[ot]Have I told you to go fvck off lately?
If not, I should do it more often.


Go ahead, report me. It's been a bad and intense weekend.[/ot]

Moderator note:

He didn't report you. Regardless of whatever interactions in the past you two have had, his post did not warrant the personal attack.
koreasportfootballcultuev9.jpg
 

giff57

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I picked up a Motobecane Mirage at a garage sale for $30. It's 12 speed with Suntour shifters.... What do you bikers know about this thing?
 

donk

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I picked up a Motobecane Mirage at a garage sale for $30. It's 12 speed with Suntour shifters.... What do you bikers know about this thing?


It depends, if the part are "superb" it was probably a good bike when it was new.

The key thing to remember, it does not matter what bike frame or parts you have if it is never ridden, a well ridden "cheap" biek is better than any uber custom bike that is never ridden.

I am off shortly to take a ride in the woods
 

donk

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Some good news, due to programs and events I helped to organize nearly 10 years ago, a kid from my old province has just qualified for the olympic selection pool for Bejing. Only problem she is either the 3rd person for 2 available spots or the 4th person for 3 available spots. If she kicks it up a notch at the national championships she could be off to Bejing.

All the hard work, and pissing people off has paid off. This was one of my goals in cycling, help someone get to the Olympics. I expected someone else to achieve this first, but maybe he'll make it to the Tour and I can be happy knowing that my actions helped others achieve their life dreams.
 

Maister

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Okay, I admit I'm not a cyclist and don't know the first thing about bikes. This post will probably leave much the same impression as someone posting on the neverending beer thread 'Is Miller lite less filling or great tasting?'

My brother bought a kit where he converted his bicycle into an e-bike. His cycle now has this tiny little electric motor thingie on back that assists in propulsion, but still requires pedalling. I was considering acquiring such a conversion kit for myself where I could commute to and from work on a converted bike and wondered if anyone had any experience or recommendations for this?
 

PlannerByDay

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24
Here is my new ride.

The wife and I bought this used and totally love it. Combined the two of us not have 7 bikes and for the last month when we ride together we take this.

New_Ride.jpg
 

martini

Cyburbian
Messages
678
Points
19
yay! tandems are fun!

The wife and I rode away from our wedding on an old cruiser that my dad rebuilt/painted. It still hangs in the garage, and gets ridden every so often, though not as frequently as we'd like to. It gets LOTS of compliments when we ride it to the bar and such. I've had the good luck of scaring the bejesus out of some drunks. That was fun!
 
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