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NEVERENDING ♾️ The NEVERENDING Bicycle Thread

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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31
Last night's Simpsons covered two of our favourite topics - bikes and killing kittens.

It was funny that they refered to the bikes as 10 speeds, they have not made those in years, inless you only use a front chainring with the new Campy and Shimano stuff. I loved Bart mooning Nelson and the boys.

As for the kitties, somone sure was busy on evergreen crescent.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,159
Points
27
I just got a brand new 2004 Specialized S-Works Frame for free from Specialized, since my last one damn near killed me.
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,825
Points
24
SWEET Frame and you can't beat the price.

Sorry to hear you almost had to give up your life as a downpayment for it. But now you can build yourself a awesome ride and enjoy it.

I looked at the S-Works line not to long ago. They are amazing. I just couldn't afford it at the time. But I've always loved Specalized.

Now we just wait for the warmER weather.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
Mark J. Reynolds

1968-2004

ANAHEIM, Calif. – Mark J. Reynolds, 35, formerly of St. Joseph, Missouri, died Thursday, January 8, 2004 in Lake Forest, Calif., while cycling in the mountains of California. Mark was an avid cyclist and died doing what he loved.

Born March 17, 1968, in St. Joseph, Mo., where he grew up and spent a large part of his life. He graduated from Central High School in 1986 and then completed a double Major in Marketing and Finance at the University of Missouri-Columbia, finishing his Bachelor’s of Science in 1991. At U of M he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity and played as a setter on the men’s volleyball team.

After college, Mr. Reynolds worked for ICI Devoe Paint, as a sales manager for ten years. He spent the next couple of years working for Carmichael Training Systems, and Chris Carmichael who is the personal coach/trainer for Lance Armstrong. In the last couple of years, he worked as a Sports Agent for the Motorcross Division of OMS Sports in Anahiem, Calif.

Mark was a competitive cyclist, riding in the ‘Expert’ class throughout Texas, California and Colorado. He was a member of numerous riding teams throughout his career including David’s Cycles, Bikesport, El Camino Bike Shop, Clarion and Hotjobs.com.

He valued family, friendship and had a true passion for life. He was preceded in death by his paternal grandparents, Fred and Helen Reynolds. Grieving his death are surviving family members: parents, Gary and Dona Reynolds, St. Joseph, Mo.; a sister, Terri Reynolds, Columbia, Mo.; maternal grandparents, Margaret and Lavene Pearl, St. Joseph, Mo.; uncles and aunts: Frederick Lee Reynolds, Athens, Ill., Scott and Lisa Reynolds, Herrin, Ill.; Roger and Teri Pearl, Savannah, Mo., Hershel Pearl, Overland Park, Kan., Carol Camp, Santa Barbara Calif., Barbara Smith, Tunica, Miss., Leslie Weller, Springfield, Ill., numerous cousins, Best Friend; Dr. Ann Marie Baker, Houston, Tex., and hundreds of other friends and fellow riders across the country.

Services: 1 p.m. Wednesday, Wyatt Park Baptist Church. Interment Savannah Cemetery. The family will receive friends 6 to 8 p.m. today, Meierhoffer Family Funeral Service, where friends may call after 6 p.m. today. Mr. Reynolds will be removed from the funeral home to arrive at the church one hour prior to the service. In lieu of flowers the family is requesting donations to be made to the Mark J. Reynolds Memorial, Children’s “First” Bicycle Fund, c/o Nodaway Valley Bank, 4001 N. Belt Hwy, St. Joseph, MO 64506, Attn. Pat Clark. This is a not-for-profit organization, which will be ongoing. Bikes will be given away around Christmas.
 

donk

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Jeff said:
I just got a brand new 2004 Specialized S-Works Frame for free from Specialized, since my last one damn near killed me.

The new aluminum /carbon one or just the "plain old" aluminum one?

I thought you were a small / light rider (from your bike size). How/where did it break?
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,159
Points
27
Aluminum/carbon and the swishy lookin top tube. Nice.

Broke the other one on the right chainstay right at the rear dropout. One too many sunken manholes I guess?

No fork though

04SWorksTarmacFrame_d.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

martini

Cyburbian
Messages
678
Points
19
Jeff said:
Broke the other one on the right chainstay right at the rear dropout. One too many sunken manholes I guess?

Nah, with this one Jeff, you can say that your HUGE and powerful legs just whipped that little frame around and, well, the frame jsut couldn't take it. Work it man! New frames are always fun.
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,266
Points
25
I might , just might buy a Trek 520 touring bike. One thousand dollars and no taxes on the 2004 models. Most reviews I've read are good and sometimes offer suggestions for alterations -things like getting Conti touring tires and changing the rear rack. The most expensive suggestions are for gear modifications, the granny gear isn't granny enough for some folks.

AND Cyclops fluid 2+, I want a quiet trainer and this looks quite tasty! Anybody know of a cheaper model that is as quiet?
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,673
Points
70
The Irish One said:
AND Cyclops fluid 2+, I want a quiet trainer and this looks quite tasty!

Now that I been on mine for a couple weeks - good work out & well worth it! :-}
I just need to monitor and adjust my glucose better.
 

ilikefish0

Cyburbian
Messages
204
Points
9
donk said:
Last night's Simpsons covered two of our favourite topics - bikes and killing kittens.

It was funny that they refered to the bikes as 10 speeds, they have not made those in years, inless you only use a front chainring with the new Campy and Shimano stuff. I loved Bart mooning Nelson and the boys.

As for the kitties, somone sure was busy on evergreen crescent.

What about 12-speed. That's what I got. (happens when you buy the cheapest road bike you can find--it's ancient). I do have to say that buying a road bike has immensely increased my enjoyment of cycling. It is so much nicer than the wal-mart "mountain" bikes that I have been using. Even if the shifting is non-indexed and the frame is actually steel. Too bad it took a theft to get me on this bike--I've been missing out.
 

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
Points
22
donk said:
On a serious note see the story on this distance record:
http://www.recumbents.com/mars/pages/lib/libtexas.html

Aside from the quip about opposable thumbs, Donk, are you perhaps becoming more respectful toward recumbency?

For you human powered speed enthusiasts, here's a link to last year's Battle Mountain challenge. No one beat 2002's record (Sam Whittington rode a blazing 81 mph or 130.4 kph), but several beat 70 mph in strong winds. See it here: WHPSC Home Page
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,825
Points
24
I just skimmed all the posts on this thread looking for some input on pedals.

I recently bought a road bike and as you know they don't come with pedals. I took my SPD pedals off my MTN bike and put them on my road bike so I can ride indoors, but as spring approaches I need to think about getting some pedals for my road bike.

Some of you commented on SPDs (negative comments), Egg Beaters (negative comments) and Time (positive).

What should I get?

I don't want to spend a ton of $$$ and I'm not to concerned about a few (20 or so) grams. I have SPDs (350 grams) on my MTN bike and they are fine but what about the LOOK pedals, or those little disc thingies?
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
Road Pedals.

I'd go with Look pedals. Get ones with almost no adjustable features (ie no float adjustment, q factor, foot tilt) all you need is release tension adjustment. Also make sure you get RED(float) cleats, not Black(no float) unless you are really good at setting the shoes and cleats up. If you decide to go with LOOK, there are always mavic pedals on ebay that are look compatible and built to last. Some are reasonably priced.

If you need lots of float or angular adjustment, speedplay(the disks) are supposed to be good. I've never tried them. I have heard they need a super stiff sole to avoid hot spots.

You may be ok, with SPD's if you have carbon soles on your mountain bike shoes. I found that my mountain shoes flexed too much and caused hot spots that is why I went to road shoes and pedals.
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,825
Points
24
Yes Road Pedals,

Thanks for the input Donk.

I was kind leaning toward LOOK pedals or SPD. I already have some road shoes, man those suckers are stiff. My road shoes are compatiable with all cleat types so I can get any pedals I want. My MTN bike shoes do have some flex to them, I thought they were stiff until I got my road shoes.

Why do you suggest pedals w/o float? Is it because I will get more power?
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
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31
Float is good. It allows your body to move at the point of interface with the bike. It is a fine balance though, some people need more float or adjustment then others.

Pedals with too much/uncontrolled float can put stress on the knees, ankles and hips unless you've trained them to have a good pedal spin. Then again, pedals with no float or not enough float can do teh same thing.

The best description I've read is that the speedplays feel like you are walking on ice until your muscles learn how they feel. This is all only from reading about them and hearing others describe them, I've never tried them.

I ride cheap looks ($150 CDN) with red (6 degree float) cleats. I've been through 5 or 6 pairs of shoes trying to find the right ones for road and am still looking.
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,825
Points
24
My MTN bike SPDs have 4 degrees of float and my knees, hips, etc feel good so I think I'll need some float.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,448
Points
25
One for the cyclists

BICYCLES BEAT BUSES, CARS IN RACE ACROSS AUCKLAND TRAFFIC JAM

Auckland, Feb 18 - Cyclists left racing car drivers in the dust today as they pushed their bikes through Auckland's gridlock traffic, becoming the fastest mode of transport in the city.

The Auckland Commuter Challenge saw four sets of cyclists, racing car drivers and buses stage simultaneous races across Auckland, with each mode competing to see who could get through the gridlock fastest.

The success of the cyclists, averaging a time of 26:51 minutes, is the latest demonstration of Auckland's traffic crisis according to the event's organisers, Cycle Action Auckland.

Jon Bridges was the first to the finish point at Aotea Square, cycling 10km from the west Auckland starting point at Lynnmall.

The TV3 presenter and producer, who clocked in at 23:49 minutes, delighted in his moment of passing outright New Zealand land speed record holder, Owen Evans, on Great North Rd.

Mr Evans, who was driving his wife's Audi V6 Turbo, said the cyclist would have been in for some ``real competition'' if he didn't have to find a carpark.

Meanwhile, Waitakere Mayor Bob Harvey and his Stagecoach bus driver were content to cruise along.

``It took us 40 minutes but then that's understandable given that we made about 20 stops,'' he said. ``In my last campaign I said I would not use the mayoral car and would start biking to work but I have to admit that I'm eating my own words.''

The cars came in second at an average of 31.32 minutes, with the buses last at an average of 53:10. Professional rally driver, Stig Blomqvist of Sweden, even had his Subaru passed by cyclist Ron King in the east Auckland race.

In one for the racing car drivers, technical New Zealand land speed record holder Ray Williams came first in the south Auckland race, clocking in at 27:37 minutes.

Event coordinator Leonard Bloksberg, of Cycle AA, said the event proved that if more commuters rode bicycles, traffic congestion would be less of a headache.

But many chose not to as they feared being hurt.

``If riding a bike you are probably more likely to get a skinned knee but if you're in a car you are more likely to be killed.''

According to Transfund there were 366 motorist, seven cyclist and zero bus rider deaths last year.

About six percent of commuters travel by bike or foot, seven percent by public transport and the rest in their cars.

Transit strategy and traffic director Terry Brown said traffic congestion was getting worse as three percent more cars each year were using the roads that had not undergone any significant work.

Tuesday's announcement of a $1.6 billion funding package to improve the road network is hoped to get Auckland moving.

Commuting Costs
Car : $1991.27 per annum (includes petrol, oil, Registration,
WOF, tyres, repairs, maintenance)
Cycle: $180 per annum (2x service, helmet, rear light, pump)
Bus : $124 -- $159 per month

NZPA NZH mcl cs
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,521
Points
23
JNL said:
....Leonard Bloksberg, of Cycle AA, ....
Once they admit to having a problem, I think there are a few Cyburbanites that should make contact with this organisation.
 

el Guapo

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31
donk said:
EG, have you moved to Monroeville?

Maybe you can share bike friendly holster tips with this guy.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04040/270970.stm

donk
Good Story Dude!
"Nicoletti said that he turned his truck around and drove toward Urick, who pulled a pistol, pointed it at him and stated that Nicoletti had "five seconds to get out [of the truck] or he would shoot," according to an affidavit that supports Urick's arrest."

Truck v. Pistola - That sounds like a justifiable winging to me. Mr. Truckdriver could have kept on going down the road, but he turned around, used his vehicle for an attack. He thought he was going to be the tough guy. Whoops. If I was on that jury the cyclist would get a pass.
 

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
Points
22
Spinning

Tried my first spinning session this morning (5:45, the best time to exercise!). Gotta get those quads back in shape (yes, I know that training on the recumbent doesn't get me enough there, but hey, the hamstrings are doing just great). It was fun to be biking with a group again since the weather here precludes that (I am definitely not one of the iron types that like to ride in freezing weather). No, it's not the same as being out on the road, but I enjoyed the group encouragement and the leader led us through a great workout. Anyone else tried it? (I suppose this makes me a Fred; oh well--I'm used to being dissed as a recumbent rider, anyway ;-) )
 

el Guapo

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31
Utility Biker Republican

In line at the Walgreens. Yeah, those are tights, you wanna make something of it? ;)
 

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DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
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880
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el Guapo said:
In line at the Walgreens. Yeah, those are tights, you wanna make something of it? ;)
So, they have security cameras at the drive through at Walgreen's, eh? :-\
 

donk

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I am so tempted to go for a ride today, it is 3 degees celsius(+/- 40 F), no wind, sunny. Only thing is the road is pretty wet and getting a cold water enemea and having to clean up after the ride leaves lots to be desired. Maybe I will go skiing instead, or pack like I am supposed to.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,263
Points
22
JNL said:
Commuting Costs
Car : $1991.27 per annum (includes petrol, oil, Registration,
WOF, tyres, repairs, maintenance)
Cycle: $180 per annum (2x service, helmet, rear light, pump)
Bus : $124 -- $159 per month

NZPA NZH mcl cs

Ok, so why is it that the car and bike are annual while the bus is monthly? I suppose some people don't need a bus pass all year long, but $1488-1908 per year (based on 12 mo.) is almost expensive as the car!
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
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31
JNL said:
Commuting Costs
Car : $1991.27 per annum (includes petrol, oil, Registration,
WOF, tyres, repairs, maintenance)
Cycle: $180 per annum (2x service, helmet, rear light, pump)
Bus : $124 -- $159 per month

NZPA NZH mcl cs

The figure for bikes seems awful low. If I commuted I'd change my cables 4-6 times a year at $30 a pop ($240) , four new tires a year @ $75 a tire ($300), 2 new chains a year at $50 a chain($100), one set of cleats a year $30, 10 tubes @ $2.50 each($25). 10 air cartridges at $3 each($30). Total = $725.

I won't even mention what my recreation costs are going to be this year (new fork, 2 pairs of new shoes, 2 new drive trains) ouch.
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,825
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24
First Ride of 2004

Well this past weekend it got up into the low (sat.) and upper (sun.) 50's and I got my first two rides (outside) of 2004 in.

And boy did if feel GOOD.

Sat. = road 22 miles with a couple of guys on some rural country roads.
Sunday = Solo ride 18 miles

It really got my blood pumpin and I can't wait to do it again.

How the rest of my fellow cyclists/planners, did any of you get out and enjoy the warm weather (that is if you had any)?
 

nuovorecord

Cyburbian
Messages
444
Points
13
First Ride of 2004

I did the Chilly Hilly ride on Bainbridge Island, just west of Seattle, yesterday. About 32 miles. It didn't really live up to the first part of the ride's name, since it was about 50 degrees, but it was most assuredly hilly. No long climbs, but lots of rollers, and a few genuinely steep pitches that really got the lactic acid flowing by the end of the ride. For a lot of people, this is the first ride of the year, and the fitness levels are all over the map. There were a lot of people pushing their bikes up the last couple of hills! The weather was great, with the sun peeking out now and then and no rain. There were over 3,000 riders on the ride, so it was a great day!

Living in Portland, it's possible to ride year round, if you get the right gear for it. I have a rain bike outfitted with fenders and lights, so I've been able to ride most weekends this winter, except when we got a big dump of snow.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,521
Points
23
Loop The Lake

It's still not too late for you to hop on a flight and make this year's Loop the Lake event. I myself probably won't be riding this year because of work committments (same excuse I used for the last 5 years) but would be prepared to accommodate Cyburbanites making the journey.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,461
Points
29
I'm Back on my bike!

Saturday was very, very nice. Sunday was a little windier, but still ridable! I may be way too fat and slow, but the City hiking has helped a little bit of fitness. Unfortunately, I've been neglecting other things like sit-ups and stuff, and my back has been killing me lately. :(

Still, did probably 60 miles this weekend! Including a climb up a cool canyon road that climbs our lkocal mountain range (Around 2500 feet at the highest peak, so they're little mountains) with waterfalls and such right by the road
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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31
No outdoors riding yet, I did ski 20KM yesterday though. I am getting the itch though. If it stays above 0 C tomorrow and I can sort through my stuff without having to unpack too much, I might try to sneek in a road ride for an hour or so.
 

PlannerByDay

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Messages
1,825
Points
24
nuovorecord said:
I did the Chilly Hilly ride on Bainbridge Island, just west of Seattle, yesterday..


I plan on doing a ride called the Hilly Hundred http://www.hillyhundred.org/ this fall. Hey all you midwesterner cyburbinite cyclists, this may be a good opportunity to meet one another.

I know some people who did it last year and they said toward the end on some of the bigger hills they would be riding in the easiest gear and going so slow that people were passing them while walking their bikes.
 

nuovorecord

Cyburbian
Messages
444
Points
13
PlannerByDay said:
I know some people who did it last year and they said toward the end on some of the bigger hills they would be riding in the easiest gear and going so slow that people were passing them while walking their bikes.

Gotta love the hills! But seeing people pushing their bikes up hills is a kind of reality check for how little difference the weight of one's bike really makes. I saw a guy doing the Chilly Hilly a couple of years back pushing his Colnago CT-1 up one of the more challenging pitches. If you aren't in shape, it doesn't matter that your bike weighs 17 lbs!
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,877
Points
57
wow... some of these bikes are hooked up. I ride alot, but I only have a Giant Ricon SE.

If anyone gets a chance, you have to ride in Marquette MI... Bike Mag named it one of the top 5 places in the US to Live and Ride.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
Announcing...

Mr. & Mrs. el Guapo would like to announce the arrival of a bouncing baby red over white 2003 Trek 1000 to their household. While Mrs. Guapo thinks it is a total waste of money and resources, Mr. Guapo said, "screw it - it is far too good of a deal to pass up - I'm getting it." The father plans to take the child down the parkway tomorrow for a 15 to 25 mile get-acquainted tour of town. Mr. Guapo's 1985 Raleigh Technium is handling the situation with class and dignity. Mr. Guapo now owns three bikes and has four more in his garage. One wonders if the "R" after his name is really so appropriate any more... ;-)

Photos to follow... :)
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,825
Points
24
el Guapo said:
Mr. & Mrs. el Guapo would like to announce the arrival of a bouncing baby red over white 2003 Trek 1000 to their household. While Mrs. Guapo thinks it is a total waste of money and resources, Mr. Guapo said, "screw it - it is far too good of a deal to pass up - I'm getting it." The father plans to take the child down the parkway tomorrow for a 15 to 25 mile get-acquainted tour of town. Mr. Guapo's 1985 Raleigh Technium is handling the situation with class and dignity. Mr. Guapo now owns three bikes and has four more in his garage. One wonders if the "R" after his name is really so appropriate any more... ;-)

Photos to follow... :)



Sounds like a nice addition to the family. I hope all is well with Ralegih your 19 year old. well He is old enough to understand the new addition to the family. At 19 are you going to kick him outta the house or is he moving to the garage.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
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5,986
Points
31
He will become my urban assult bike. Fenders, panniers, 400 Watt Blaupunkt, six speaker DVD and a kicking subwolfer! (kidding about the electronics) He is going to become my utility bike.
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,266
Points
25
Bikeforums has a minor discussion going on that relates to Transportation planning and well planning in general.http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=47514 It seems that everyone in California expects to pay at least $3.00 a gallon for gas this summer. Right now in Northern San Diego the unocal 76 high performance it is $2.49. I'm riding plenty!
 

annie

Member
Messages
39
Points
2
PlannerByDay said:
I plan on doing a ride called the Hilly Hundred http://www.hillyhundred.org/ this fall. Hey all you midwesterner cyburbinite cyclists, this may be a good opportunity to meet one another.

I know some people who did it last year and they said toward the end on some of the bigger hills they would be riding in the easiest gear and going so slow that people were passing them while walking their bikes.

I of course, find it hard to believe that there are hills like this in the midwest! ...but only because I'm a transplanted east coaster. I did manage to break a derailleur on a trail winding (wait, not winding, going straight) up from the Mississippi, and I've seen pro's attempt to bike up a 24% grade in a race, so maybe...but I've mainly just been mad that I still have a triple.
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,825
Points
24
annie said:
I of course, find it hard to believe that there are hills like this in the midwest! ...but only because I'm a transplanted east coaster. I did manage to break a derailleur on a trail winding (wait, not winding, going straight) up from the Mississippi, and I've seen pro's attempt to bike up a 24% grade in a race, so maybe...but I've mainly just been mad that I still have a triple.

I too found that hard to believe at first. But you must consider that the ride is 50 miles per day for two days. On the first day there is a total climb of 2700 feet and the second day is 2200 of climb. It is not that the hills are steep it is that they are steep and loooooong.

like this one

03hilly_1.jpg


You just gotta take it slow so you can finish the 100 miles
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,266
Points
25
This is very funny perfectly describes touring and long rides in the heat

http://cyclingtrip.com/sections/guide/index.htm


Craig's Beginners Guide to Preparing For a Cycling Trip:



Step 1: Get a spagetti-strainer and several small sponges. Soak the sponges in salt-water and paste them to the inside of the spagetti-strainer. Place the
strainer on your head. Find a busy road. Stand by the side of the road and do
deep knee-bends for 8 hours. This will acclimatize you to a day's ride.

Step 2: Take some 200-grit sandpaper and rub your rear-end and the insides of your legs for about 20 minutes. Rinse with salt-water. Repeat. Then, sit on a softball for 8 hours. Do this daily for at least 8 days.

Step 3: Each day, take two twenty-dollar bills and tear them into small pieces. Place the pieces on a dinner-plate, douse them with lighter fluid and burn them. Inhale the smoke (simulating car-fumes). Rub the ashes on your face. Then go to the local motel and ask them for a room.

Step 4: Take a 1-quart plastic bottle. Fill it from the utility sink of a local
gas-station (where the mechanics wash their hands). Let the bottle sit in the
sun for 2 or 3 hours until it's good and tepid. Seal the bottle up (kinda,
sorta) and drag it through a ditch or swamp. Walk to a busy road. Place your
spagetti-strainer on your head and drink the swill-water from the bottle while
doing deep knee-bends along the side of the road.

Step 5: Get some of those Dutch wooden-shoes. Coat the bottoms with 90-W
gear-oil. Go to the local supermarket (preferably one with tile floors). Put
the oil-coated, wooden shoes on your feet and go shopping.

Step 6: Think of a song from the 1980's that you really hated. Buy the CD and play 20 seconds of that song over and over and over for about 6 hours. Do more deep knee-bends

Step 7: Hill training: Do your deep knee-bends for about 4 hours with the
salt-soaked spagetti-strainer on your head, while you drink the warm
swill-water and listen to the 80's song over and over (I would recommend "I'm a cowboy/On a STEEL horse I ride!" by Bon Jovi). At the end of 4 hours, climb onto the hood of a friend's car and have him drive like a lunatic down the twistiest road in the area while you hang on for dear life.

Step 8: Humiliation training: Wash your car and wipe it down with a
chamois-cloth. Make sure you get a healthy amount of residual soap and
road-grit embedded in the chamois. Put the chamois on your body like a
loin-cloth, then wrap your thighs and middle-section with cellophane. Make sure it's really snug. Paint yourself from the waist down with black latex paint. Cut an onion in half and rub it into your arm-pits. Put on a brightly colored shirt and your Dutch oil-coated wooden shoes and go shopping at a crowded local mall.

Step 9: Foul weather training: Take everything that's important to you, pack it in a Nylon corodura bag and place it in the shower. Get in the shower with it. Run the water from hot to cold. Get out and without drying off, go to the local convienience store. Leave the wet, important stuff on the sidewalk. Go inside and buy $10 worth of Gatorade and Fig Newtons.

Step 10: As Archimedes hypothesized: "Use a simple lever to move the Earth from one place to another". After doing that, go around your house and lift heavy things that you never imagined a person could lift. Surprise yourself. Do 1,000 sit-ups. Then 10,000. Eat lunch. Repeat. Argue with every girlfriend/boyfriend you've ever known and be RIGHT. Solve all the problems of politics, faith and economics. At the end of the day, get into a huge tub filled with hot soapy water and relax, because tomorrow is another BIG DAY ON THE BIKE!
Step 11: Headwinds training: Buy a huge map of the entire country. Spread it in front of you. Have a friend hold a hair-dryer in your face. Stick your feet in
taffy and try to pull your knees to your chest while your friend tries to
shove you into a ditch or into traffic with his free hand. Every 20 minutes
or so, look at the huge map and marvel at the fact that you have gone nowhere after so much hard work and suffering. Fold the map in front of a window-fan set to "High".
 

el Guapo

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31
The Irish One said:
Bikeforums has a minor discussion going on that relates to Transportation planning and well planning in general.http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=47514 It seems that everyone in California expects to pay at least $3.00 a gallon for gas this summer. Right now in Northern San Diego the unocal 76 high performance it is $2.49. I'm riding plenty!


Dude, What is your BF id? BTW - Cleaned, sewed and siliconized the panniers the other day. Gosh do we use the heck out of them.

As promised: http://www.ponyexpress.net/~troop45/CyclingMeritBadge.html if you look close you can see one of the Jadd panniers on my son's bike.
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,266
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25
What is your BF id?
:-$ :-$ :-$ Hotwheels.

It makes my day to know that the panniers are being used!

Now isn't it nice to know that we bicyclist are in the thoughts of Kunstler.

Eyesore of the Month
eyesore_200404.jpg
 

Plannerbabs

Cyburbian
Messages
1,037
Points
23
Ok, a question for all you gearheads: if a girl wanted to buy a nice bike, for mostly city streets and the occasional trail, but only had about $350-400 to spare, what would you recommend? I'm lusting for a Cannondale Bad Boy, but that's way out of my price range. Doesn't have to be all fancy, either--the bikes with shocks all over the place are a bit squishy for my taste.
 
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