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NEVERENDING ♾️ The NEVERENDING Bicycle Thread

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29
el Guapo said:
I asked for the Dura-Ace Carbon OCLV upper humorous bone,
I don't usually read this thread so today is the first time I saw this entry. Given the humorous tone of your post, I am wondering if this is an intentional misspelling of humerus (which I may be spelling wrong too :-o :-$ ) or if it was morphine-induced. :D
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,678
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70
Big packs of bikes pique police
Riders take over streets of New York and ignore traffic rules

Headline from USA Today Tuesday Nov. 16, 2004
http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/news/20041116/a_bikes16.art.htm

Story about Critical Mass
"Critical Mass bike rides began in 1992 in San Francisco and have spread to more than 300 cities across the country and overseas. The rides are designed to encourage bicycling as an environmentally friendly way to get around the city.

Advocates of urban bicycling worry that the fracas will weaken public support for spending city money on bike lanes and paths on the city's bridges and waterfront, says Transportation Alternatives, a New York advocacy group. That would make riding a bicycle in Manhattan, which already ranges from challenging to terrifying, even more difficult, ....."
 

The Irish One

Member
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2,266
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25
Saw this at BikeForums today

The MountainGoat

931the_mountaingoat_stor.jpg
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Tour de Bear

When this old Bear gets past the bone marrow stem cell transplant and gets back in shape......the Myata 12-speed "wonderbike" comes off the garage hooks.

Probably at least a year away, but time flies when you're having fun.

The Tour de Bear will be a short distance trek for you serious bikers out there, but for a Bear just getting back on the saddle, it will be a butt-buster. We will start at Mallard Lake (Oak Openings Metropark). The circle trail first, once around.....then baack on the Evergreen Lake tangent (to EL and back). Another circle, this time the other way around. Then on to the spur that takes us to the old railroad bed trail, which is a straight line between Maumee, OH and the area around the park.

We will shoot west on the RR trail, going as far as Route 64, then swing back the other way and ride to Maumee. Flip again in Maumee and head back to Mallard Lake.

Wild guess at the distance: 35-40 Miles
Terrain: Flat, as only NW Ohio can be.
Scenery: Trees (primarily) and farms (some).
Bugs: Skeeters any early-to-mid Summer day, after 8:00 PM and before 8:00 AM.
Snakes: Yes, if it is a sunny day. Territorial, so they will chase you sometimes.
Water: None along the way so bring plenty.
Condominiums: Viewed from the RR Trail, east of Monclova, OH. (LOL)
Facilities: I said there were trees, didn't I?
Cocktails: Hub's (Swanton) or Loma Linda's (Swanton)

Be there.

Lance Bearstrong
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,825
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24
Sears Robuck & CO Free Spirit Ted Williams Bike

I recently acquired 2 old Sears Robuck & CO Free Spirit Ted Williams Bike (his and hers).

I have looked around on the internet trying to find some info on these and have not had much luck.

Anyone have some links to websites to find old bike info. I'm trying to find out how old they are and I would like to rehab them so I also need to find some parts.
 

nuovorecord

Cyburbian
Messages
444
Points
13
PlannerByDay said:
I recently acquired 2 old Sears Robuck & CO Free Spirit Ted Williams Bike (his and hers).

I have looked around on the internet trying to find some info on these and have not had much luck.

Anyone have some links to websites to find old bike info. I'm trying to find out how old they are and I would like to rehab them so I also need to find some parts.

Try posting on Bike Forums or checking with Harris Cyclery/Sheldon Brown.

So, had those Ted Williams bikes been cryogenically preserved for all these years? ;)
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
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1,825
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nuovorecord said:
Try posting on Bike Forums or checking with Harris Cyclery/Sheldon Brown.

So, had those Ted Williams bikes been cryogenically preserved for all these years? ;)

I just posted to Bike Forums thanks for the suggestion and will check our Harris next.

The bike are in really good shape but they don't have any air in the tires, I think that is kind of like draining all the blood out of someone before they are frozen, so maybe they were cryogenically preserved. :-|
 

JNA

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Mountain bike oasis created in Cleveland
By Sal Ruibal, USA TODAY, Jan. 19, 2005, pg 3c

http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/sports/20050119/indoorbike.art.htm

"...is Ray's MTB Indoor Park, a 66,000-square-foot playground that gives snow-challenged riders an opportunity to hone their skills on a remarkable structure that looks more like a wooden roller coaster than an Alpine trail.

The indoor mountain has different sections for skill levels that range from rank beginner to pro racer."

Petro has received inquiries about building similar parks in other cities, but he prefers to stay true to the volunteer spirit that built his dream.

“I'd be glad to get paid to help someone start up a facility in, say, New York City,” he says. “I have to make a living. But I don't want to become the Burger King of mountain biking.”

The park's Web site http://www.raysmtb.com/
 

zman

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I haven't read this whole thread, but I have been wanting to get back into biking for a while. When I got my job here back last summer, I took two rides around the area. We have a nice trail system and montains are nearby.
When I rode last summer, I was usuing my old mountain bike, from the late 90s, and it is decent, nothing cheap.
Mainly I ride on road, and it feels that I may want to try a road bike, but I would not like to sink a ton of cash into a bike if I am not going to use it much.
What would you bike heads out in Cyburbia recommend. There is a bike shop north of here near the Colorado State campus that rents bikes daily, weekly, or monthly. Should I rent and see if I like it?
Hopefully I will get into it and I can add more to this thread later.
Back to reading it....
Thanks for any advise given...
ZMan
 

The Irish One

Member
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Put some road tires on your mountain bike, and ride until you know this is what you want, then buy that roa bike. and yes, rent a road bike, that sounds fun
 

zman

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33
The Irish One said:
Put some road tires on your mountain bike, and ride until you know this is what you want, then buy that roa bike. and yes, rent a road bike, that sounds fun

I think I may ride the mountain bike around and get used to it, you know, back in the saddle. And then maybe rent. Also at the same shop, they have used bikes too. Maybe I will find a used one in good shape... gotta spend money on something or the girlfriend won't know what to complain about.... :p
 

donk

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zmanPLAN said:
I think I may ride the mountain bike around and get used to it, you know, back in the saddle. And then maybe rent. Also at the same shop, they have used bikes too. Maybe I will find a used one in good shape... gotta spend money on something or the girlfriend won't know what to complain about.... :p

I'd second the suggestion of putting "slicks" on your mtb. Only caution is that if you really want to road ride, using a road bike is more enjoyable. The postion on a mtb is not really condusive to cranking out the miles.

Caution on any advice I provide, I have 3 bikes and no girl friends. ;)
 

munibulldog

Cyburbian
Messages
278
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10
zmanPLAN said:
What would you bike heads out in Cyburbia recommend.

I'm a bike commuter not a sporty type. I like older Schwinn 10 speeds. My current one is a $2 garage sale special. Along with maintenance things, I modify the bikes a lot:

New tires
New brake shoes
Install fenders
Install generator and lights
Add a flat handlebar (actually a 2" rise) and high stem riser.
Change out the seat to a bigger more comfortable one
Bolt together a rear rack out of aluminum bar stock

These are heavy bikes but they can handle daily use without needing repair very much, which is important for commuters. I don't pedal fast, my goal is to get to work without breaking a sweat. As a matter of fact, I just cruise along in low gear pedaling only as much as I need to.

These bikes are kind of heavy but they roll along without too much effort.
 

zman

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Reading some of the earlier posts in the thread, I may be inclined to do more with biking. Like becoming good and doing races/organized rides. It has really inspired me to maybe dust off the Trek and bike this weekend in the warm weather. Maybe a ride to the local airport and partake in my other hobby, watching aircraft. :D

...but I'll probably be house hunting
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
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1,825
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I was a mountain biker for many years and recently bought a road bike. I wanted a road bike for maybe 3 years and then one day bought one. I love it.

I offer the following suggestion.
1) get slicks for you mtb and start riding on the road to find out if you enjoy riding with traffic. I know it freaks some people out. Do you enjoy it??
2) check around to see if there are any bike clubs in your area that do road riding. It is always funner to ride in a group even if it is only 3-4 people. Drafting and riding in a pace line can be really fun. Many gyms or fitness clubs have them. Are there any in your area??
3) If you find a bike club ride with them. Depending on the club you may be alright with slicks on your mtb otherwise you might want to rent a road bike. By riding with them couple times you will find out if they are the type of people you want to hang out with.

If you answered yes to question 1 and 3 then go to 4

4) buy a road bike.
 

zman

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PlannerByDay said:
I was a mountain biker for many years and recently bought a road bike. I wanted a road bike for maybe 3 years and then one day bought one. I love it.

I offer the following suggestion.
1) get slicks for you mtb and start riding on the road to find out if you enjoy riding with traffic. I know it freaks some people out. Do you enjoy it??
2) check around to see if there are any bike clubs in your area that do road riding. It is always funner to ride in a group even if it is only 3-4 people. Drafting and riding in a pace line can be really fun. Many gyms or fitness clubs have them. Are there any in your area??
3) If you find a bike club ride with them. Depending on the club you may be alright with slicks on your mtb otherwise you might want to rent a road bike. By riding with them couple times you will find out if they are the type of people you want to hang out with.

If you answered yes to question 1 and 3 then go to 4

4) buy a road bike.

I'm going to ride the paved trails in my town, and the bike lanes on the lesser used two-lane roads first to get into shape. I may ride with my friend but he is a serious biker, doing the Ride the Rockies competition every year here in Colorado. So, we'll see he'll be excited to ride with someone though... and it'll be good to have a "pacesetter"
 

JNA

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From the NY Times Book Review; Jan. 30, 2005:

'Bicycle': It Is About the Bike
By David V. Herlihy
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/30/books/review/30KORENL.html

Great Quote from 1895:
''A ride in its saddle is the perfection of motion and the acme of gentle exercise. Once there, a man or woman wants to be there most of their time. The desire grows. And this is the reason why bicycling is not a fad, but something that is going to last so long as men and women have legs.''

First Chapter at:
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/30/books/chapters/0130-1st-herli.html
 

JNL

Cyburbian
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2,448
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Hi guys! I always felt that this thread was for the cycling nuts, and I wasn't much into cycling... but I'm starting to get into it and I see you guys could be a great help with beginner questions!

I've got a triathlon (my first ever!!) coming up in a month and I dug out my old bike that I had when I was like 14, and while it's still a beautiful shade of fuschia and in working order, I don't think it's going to cut the mustard. My friends think it's hilarious - it's an old-school kind of girl's bike, and I can't really figure out what it's good for, except for doing a few laps around the block... not especially good for speed or off-road!

So after no cycling for about 10 years, I'm getting back into it... and loving it! Only been a few times. I can't wait to get a towbar for my car and a bike rack, and a computer thingy to check speed and distance :)

I went for a cruise yesterday (gravel road along water's edge, out to a light house, beautiful sunny day!!!) with my friend and used her mtb and it was so much better! She's gonna lend it to me for the tri, and put some slicks on it for the day. Cool!

So now I'm going to start thinking about what kind of new bike I want to get. If I was just doing triathlons, I might go for a road bike. But that's not much fun - I like the idea of exploring off-road. I understand you can get a mtb and then fit acessories as required for different rides? I know almost nothing about forks and stuff... so watch this space for lots of beginner questions! Maybe I should go back and read all the previous posts....

JNL... aka newbie cyclist :)
 

Wulf9

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You can get a very capable entry level bike for $300-600 American. Ride a while and decide what you really want. That's what I am doing right now. My current bke is a Giant Cypress SX, which will be replaced with something nicer in a couple of years.

Another approach would be to research well and buy a much better bike based on the research. My daughter did that and ultimately traded in her "good" bike for a far better bike. So she did the entry level thing, but with a much more expensive first bike.
 

el Guapo

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Greetings Kids,
I just got back from Calcutta (Kolkata) India a week ago Sunday night with a 26" Hero singlespeed in my big suitcase. I had to do some serious disassembly and some cutting of the rear chainstays with a hacksaw to get it in the suitcase. I took the entire bike apart with only a crescent wrench and a standard screwdriver. A little bit of welding and it should be just fine.

India_Trip_Day_14%20034.jpg


I got it here
India_Trip_Day_8%20057.jpg


Here it is in its natural environment
India Trip 045.jpg


For 2080 Rupies (~$US 48.00) I got the bike, two dynamos with both front and back lights, a soviet style kickstand, a bell, a rear rack, and the joy of owning another bike unlike anyone else has here in the area.

While I was there I also saw a TV news story (NDTV) on the Indian Road Cycling team. They were riding heavy steel single speed bikes that looked like road bikes. They had a "Huffy-eske" quality about them. It was obvious to me that the team's general bike handling skills were not very developed.

I saw two westerners tour cycling while I was there. They were the only people wearing bike helmets I saw in all of Calcutta.

I have many more amazing photos of crazy cycling to share. I'll try to get them posted to the web soon.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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For JNL

Depending on the type of off road riding you might want to do, I would suggest getting a cyclocross bike. It fits and rides like a road bike, but has clearance for wider/aggressive tires for dirt road riding. Not totally off roadable, but very ridable for most people.

Yes you can make a mtb ride well on the raod, but in some cases you might as well buy a road bike. If tri is what you want to do, then buy a road bike. if you think yoou want to do various things a cross bike or mtb is probably ok for you. One caution on mtb's on teh road, they are almost always slower than an equivalent road bike due to gear ratios and position.
 

JNA

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That must have been fun going through Customs ?

Which model did you get ? The Jet Master ?
 

zman

Cyburbian
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Hey, would you "Bike Heads" ride 20 miles each way in commuting to work?
 

donk

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zmanPLAN said:
Hey, would you "Bike Heads" ride 20 miles each way in commuting to work?

That would be at the upper limit and only if it was not too hilly and I did not have to do it everyday. Nothing worse than an hour in the rain. At an easy pace it would be about an 1:15 to an 1:30 or if I busted a gut 55 minutes. That is alot of training every day
 

zman

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Well this is all contengent if I build a house in this area I looked at on Saturday. But it would be relatively flat, I would keep my rec center membership, so I can shower before work, and I would probably only ride on Friday or something...

... I better not count my chickens before they hatch, but I do like speculating.... ;)
 

JNL

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donk said:
For JNL
if you think yoou want to do various things a cross bike or mtb is probably ok for you. One caution on mtb's on teh road, they are almost always slower than an equivalent road bike due to gear ratios and position.
I know a mtb is not ideal for the tri, but it is faster than my current wheels! Current bike is heavy and the centre of gravity seems a little off or something. Friends mtb is a lot easier to get up speed quickly, so it should do the trick! For the upcoming tri anyway.

Longer term, what you called a cyclocross sounds like what I'm after.

Hey, how come we don't have a cycle smilie? :)
 

JNA

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JNL said:
Hey, how come we don't have a cycle smilie? :)
Good point, but does this not open the the door to other special interest groups, say Sam's Law, I do(n't) agree/like Kunstler opinions, etc...
 

JNL

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JNA said:
Good point, but does this not open the the door to other special interest groups, say Sam's Law, I do(n't) agree/like Kunstler opinions, etc...
I was only joking :)
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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6,461
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29
Boy: my off-season walking program

has not translated into cycling at all. I am not in cycling shape at all anymore.
I rode for the first time in two months this weekend. (Sun and 60 degrees instead of rain/fog and 45)

Reasons:

1. I am too fat. Too much rich food and sweets!

2. The casual pace walking and hill climbing in San Francisco and Berkeley I did this winter did NOT keep me in bicycling shape. Totally different muscles and intensity level (cycling is much higher) and I could not get a proper cadence, my new cluster was not working well, and I had no hope of keeping up with a friend in his (strong) girlfriend on their new high end tandem. Humiliating and miserable. I totally suffered and feel like I will have to start over.

Quite disappointing.
 

The Irish One

Member
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I have many more amazing photos of crazy cycling to share. I'll try to get them posted to the web soon.

Did you ride?

had no hope of keeping up with a friend in his (strong) girlfriend on their new high end tandem
How embarrasing, you actually rode with tandem -ers ;) .
 

BKM

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donk said:
At least it was not a recumbent. ;)

If I don't watch myself, I will be falling right into the recumbent demographic (fat, bearded, middle aged, goofy grin on their face) :-@
 

zman

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BKM said:
If I don't watch myself, I will be falling right into the recumbent demographic (fat, bearded, middle aged, goofy grin on their face) :-@

That's funny.... :-D
 

The Irish One

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At least it was not a recumbent.

On my last tour I saw husband/wife tandem recumbent tourers. The guy had a beard. they were north bound I was southbound. Nice size Canadian flag on the back of the bike I was amazed at the power these two were producing, it was very cool. :)
 

JNL

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25
Cycle rack

I want to get a cycle rack for my car. Problem is I don't have a towbar. I got a quote to have a towbar fitted, and then I would have to purchase the rack as well. Then I heard about a kind of rack that fits on to any hatch-back or lift-back cars (which I have), without needing a towbar. It would be a lot cheaper. Anyone have experience with this kind of rack? I'm wondering if they do the job just as well as the other kinds.
 

donk

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JNL said:
I want to get a cycle rack for my car. Problem is I don't have a towbar. I got a quote to have a towbar fitted, and then I would have to purchase the rack as well. Then I heard about a kind of rack that fits on to any hatch-back or lift-back cars (which I have), without needing a towbar. It would be a lot cheaper. Anyone have experience with this kind of rack? I'm wondering if they do the job just as well as the other kinds.


There are basically three types of racks.

1) Roof rack, it clamps to the roof of your car and has various attachments available for it. (ie ski racks, rocket box, kayak holder etc). Plus holds bikes securely, leave on. minus expensive, a bit of wind noise and gas issues, not easily moveable from vehicle to vehicle (trays do, but rails won't) plus if you have your bikes on top, no getting into a garage.

AT-BT76C.gif


2) Towbar rack. i am assuming by towbar you mean the receptacle for a ball to pull a trailer or trailer hitch. Plus, easy to put on and off, minus mars finish of bikes a bit, blocks trunck. Cost middle.

SR-TRSPT5.gif


3) Trunk rack. Plus - inexpensive, holds bikes pretty much universal fit on vehicles, easy on easy off, can share between vehicles. Minus, can mar finish of car and bikes. Know lots of people who use these as they are super easy and inexpensive.

SR-1052.gif


Really depends on your budget and how much you want to scream I am a bike geek to the world. If I did not have a roof rack system on my car and could not afford one, i'd get the trunk rack over the hitch probably.
 

JNL

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Hey thanks donk :) Number 2 is probably the most common here, followed by 1, but I hadn't seen 3 before today. Yes it was 2 and 3 I was asking about - I might give #3 a go, I can always upgrade later! Cheers mate :D
 

SkeLeton

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JNL said:
Number 2 is probably the most common here, followed by 1, but I hadn't seen 3 before today. Yes it was 2 and 3 I was asking about - I might give #3 a go, I can always upgrade later!
That's odd, the most frequent bike racks I see here are #3 and #1... Now.. I doubt my parents want to buy a bike rack... our bikes are just hanging around there in hooks in our pseudo-garage, rarely used and gathering dust and spider webs :p
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
I'm using a towbar mounted Thule 4 bike rack. Love it. I also made a homemade tow bar mounted bike rack once. It worked great. It was just real ugly.

Moderator note:

I tried to upload an image but was denied by evil errant code devils
 

zman

Cyburbian
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9,244
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33
I have a roof rack, Bike and Ski, that I got as a pakcage deal when I graduated high school. (SO many years ago) It was installed on my old Volvo, and when I got the new Subaru last October, it was an easy transition to the Subaru factory roof rack.
 

zman

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9,244
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33
Got my first catalog from the Colorado Cyclist out of Colo. Springs.

I was looking through it at lunch and MAN, everything is expensive... I guess it is for more serious/rich cyclists.

Some of their bikes had "Prices too low to advertise" but the cheapest bike I saw was $1499.00 :-o

They seemed expensive, but oh well. I think I will check the used place out first ;-)
 

PlannerByDay

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zmanPLAN said:
Some of their bikes had "Prices too low to advertise" but the cheapest bike I saw was $1499.00 :-o

I paid more than that for my bike. But here is why. I knew I wanted one and I didn't want to buy a cheap $800 bike, regret it and then buy a more expensive bike and end up having to buy 2 bikes.

I bought a $400 kayak, because I was not sure how much I would use it, know darn well the whole time I would love it. Now 3 years later I'm in the market for a new one and wished I had bought a better one. And can only sell the cheap boat for $200.
 

zman

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PlannerByDay said:
I paid more than that for my bike. But here is why. I knew I wanted one and I didn't want to buy a cheap $800 bike, regret it and then buy a more expensive bike and end up having to buy 2 bikes.

I bought a $400 kayak, because I was not sure how much I would use it, know darn well the whole time I would love it. Now 3 years later I'm in the market for a new one and wished I had bought a better one. And can only sell the cheap boat for $200.

Even stuff like jerseys and shorts, something I would need more than a new bike, was $59.99 on the cheap. I know of other places where I can get this stuff for cheaper.
But I think I am more like you and your kayak. I'm not looking to spend too much dough until I know that it will become an obsession.
 

donk

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zmanPLAN said:
Even stuff like jerseys and shorts, something I would need more than a new bike, was $59.99 on the cheap. I know of other places where I can get this stuff for cheaper.
But I think I am more like you and your kayak. I'm not looking to spend too much dough until I know that it will become an obsession.

Unless you are an experienced cyclist, or friends with one, I'd stay away from ordering a bike mailorder. You'll need help getting sized, and having it tuned once things settle in. For a beginner cyclist, I'd look at spending 500-1000 USD on a bike, you'll have it for ever or be able to ride it for a year or 2 before you decide to upgrade. EG has had good luck with less expensive bikes. Other hint is to look at 2004's, bike shops will want to move them now to make room for the 2005's, plus they are paid for.
 
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zman

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33
I have friend who is VERY into biking, and he has been looking to help me get into it.
He even offered to help me build a bike, if we find the right parts, as for now, I think we'll vamp my mountain bike into some more capable on the roads.
 

JNA

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26,678
Points
70
Article from USA TODAY, Tues. Feb. 15, 2005

Help wanted: Soigneur
•Job title: Soigneur for professional cycling team.
•Duties: Take care of several cyclists before, during and after races. Massage experience a must. Other duties include cleaning, packing, driving, cooking, rendering medical assistance, sports psychology and fluency in several languages.
•Supervisor: Finicky riders, Napoleonic team managers, demanding sponsors and various girlfriends, boyfriends, husbands and wives.
•Pluses: You get to meet and know famous cyclists.
•Minuses: You get to meet and know famous cyclists.
•Salary: $25,000 to $100,000 annually.

Longer Article at:
Long, hard, tough … ‘and wonderful'
Cycling ‘soigneurs' act as cook, cleaner, doctor and shrink

http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/sports/20050215/c3focus15.art.htm

Highlight:
Soigneur is a French word that means “one who cares for others.”

In the case of a soigneur (swan-YOOR) who toils for a professional cycling team, caring for others includes responsibilities that would make even the most doting mother cringe.

“The worst job in sports? That sounds about right,”
 
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