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The NEVERENDING Raising Children Thread

Richmond Jake

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Pretty sure I’ll be placed in the Wicked Stepfather category as a result of this action. Yesterday afternoon was the straw that broke the camel’s back. After listening to a few minutes of vulgar language coming out of his room, I decided to exchange work stations with ZG and began clearing my desk. My plan was, she goes to the office (which abuts his bedroom) and I’ll relocate to the area off the kitchen. She didn’t want to do that because this area has a nice view of the outdoors. So she decided to make this move to increase the ability to monitor his computer use. Maybe he'll actually become social again. We hope it’s effective.
 

Queen B

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This thread is both great for me and very scary. I have an 11 month old son and a 16 week bun in the oven right now.

Proceed - oh wise and experienced. :-D
They make them really cute and adorable in the beginning so that later on when you want to kill them, you remember how cute they were.....
 

Gedunker

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Oh wise Cyburbia planning parent friends: What do you do with an 11 year old boy who simply always has to have the last WORD. He's a good kid and a good student, although the difficulties of fifth grade are beginning to show. WORD. He has his moments like all kids. WORD. Then there's no ending the discussion with him without one of us (me or Mrs. G) getting frustrated and sometimes angry. WORD. "Son, do you have anything else to say?" WORD. "Okay, that's it then, this conversation is over." WORD. "Don't say anything else." WORD.

It's not sassy backtalk -- it's an absolute insistence on having the final WORD. It's driving me batty. WORD.:-x
 

noottamevas

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Oh wise Cyburbia planning parent friends: What do you do with an 11 year old boy who simply always has to have the last WORD. He's a good kid and a good student, although the difficulties of fifth grade are beginning to show. WORD. He has his moments like all kids. WORD. Then there's no ending the discussion with him without one of us (me or Mrs. G) getting frustrated and sometimes angry. WORD. "Son, do you have anything else to say?" WORD. "Okay, that's it then, this conversation is over." WORD. "Don't say anything else." WORD.

It's not sassy backtalk -- it's an absolute insistence on having the final WORD. It's driving me batty. WORD.:-x
Let him have it. I have a 17 year old the same way. When he started a few years ago, I insisted on arguing with him and show him I am in charge and I will determine when the conversation was over. This just lead to escalated exchanges over petty things and we hated each other. I finally had enough and started making my point and shutting up. He always adds something why I'm wrong, but then he shuts up. What I found is he is hearing what I have to say and follows my advice more now that we aren't yelling for hours because he left the milk out.
 

Habanero

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On the final word, and having never been on the parental side of that issue, here's what I had growing up. My sister slammed her door, my mom said not to do it again, she did (or course) and my mother took the door off it's hinges. I wanted to stay up and read past bedtime, the woman took my lightbulbs. I tried the same "last word" thing in an argument during highschool, the fuses to my room was removed so I could see just how good I had it without bills, etc. It worked for us though, we never knew what would be the punishment for acting like a fool but it always taught us something (other than that our mother got creative with punishments)

Could you revert to the 1,2,3 thing?

Mine won't sleep, doesn't want to fall asleep, won't go back to sleep if she wakes up. She's 2 1/2 now but I'm lacking in sleep and good humor. Any ideas other than locking her in a room and hoping for the best? (Kidding, a little ;)).
 

Zoning Goddess

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Mine won't sleep, doesn't want to fall asleep, won't go back to sleep if she wakes up. She's 2 1/2 now but I'm lacking in sleep and good humor. Any ideas other than locking her in a room and hoping for the best? (Kidding, a little ;)).
My son stopped taking naps at 2, and by 2 1/2 also would not go to bed. I tried everything I could find to try: walking him back to bed, carrying him back to bed, routines, reading to him, storybooks on tape, standing on the other side of the bedroom door and holding it shut, you name it. He had to get up at 7 but would stay up until 11, 12, 1 a.m.

I never did find a solution. He finally got over it a couple years later, deciding that being read to, then having a book on tape when I left the room, worked for him.
 

btrage

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Mine won't sleep, doesn't want to fall asleep, won't go back to sleep if she wakes up. She's 2 1/2 now but I'm lacking in sleep and good humor. Any ideas other than locking her in a room and hoping for the best? (Kidding, a little ;)).
Is she being active enough during the day to make her sleepy at the appropriate time? Perhaps her nap during the day is too long. Try shortening that up.

My wife and I found that you shouldn't wait until the kid is "acting tired" to put them to bed. If you're on a regular schedule in terms of bed times, etc. try to anticipate when the "acting tired" phase is going to start and put her to sleep 15-20 minutes before that. Kids don't like going to sleep when they're tired, because they get frustrated. Put them in bed a little early with some books and maybe that'll work.
 

SW MI Planner

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Mine won't sleep, doesn't want to fall asleep, won't go back to sleep if she wakes up. She's 2 1/2 now but I'm lacking in sleep and good humor. Any ideas other than locking her in a room and hoping for the best? (Kidding, a little ;)).
I agree with ZG stick to a routine, i.e. bath, brush teeth, potty, turn on night lights and soothing cd, put her to bed. If she gets out, walk her back into bed without saying a word. Just keep at it, sooner than later she will get the point.

(this advice coming from a 4 year old with the same stinking problem!!)
 

NHPlanner

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Regarding bedtimes for little ones.....

ROUTINE ROUTINE ROUTINE

Stick with it, make it the same process every night. It works. Even if they're up talking and singing....as long as they stay in bed, we let them (granted, Casey is still in a crib so he's not going anywhere).

Wes' naps are getting shorter all the time, and some days we skip the nap for him....but we don't waiver on the bedtime routine unless we're away from the house (that's a whole 'nuther story....)

I agree with ZG stick to a routine, i.e. bath, brush teeth, potty, turn on night lights and soothing cd, put her to bed. If she gets out, walk her back into bed without saying a word. Just keep at it, sooner than later she will get the point.

(this advice coming from a 4 year old with the same stinking problem!!)
Another supernanny convert? ;)
 

zman

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As someone without kids, I still avidly read this thread and I am facsinated by it all.
 

Zoning Goddess

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Well it was ugly. My kid walked in from his first day at the alternative h.s. and immediately noticed his p.c. in the nook. That descended into a series of "F you" and fingers in my face and door slamming. Started to microwave some Hot Pockets but flung them all over the kitchen. Followed by sobbing about how horrible the new school is. I don't know what to think, other than I am physically and emotionally exhausted from today's efforts. Ate a huge dinner with us, and went to bed.

What is with kids not taking any responsibility anymore? I got transferred to this school because Ms Parker is a b*tch. Not, I didn't go to class and I was failing? Mom, I need my computer back in my room, not gee sorry, I cussed for hours on end no matter how many times you told me to stop.l
 

ofos

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ZG, you did good. Don't beat yourself up and don't give in. Give it back to him in small pieces if/when he earns it. Yank it all back when he reverts to form.
RJ, back her up even when you think she's wrong. Kids need to have consistent messages and they'll play you against each other.
 

Jen

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computers in the bedroom, yi yi yi, I hope I never give in to that one! My friend's son, a 12 yo choir boy and boy scout was caught looking at pron on his computer in his bedroom. The Mom was floored had no idea! Then she discovered charges on her cc. Now the computer sits in the family room, under parental controls.

On saturday I was rather proud of the way I held it all together in the faces of two gnarly haired preteens who refused to get their hair cut. I was in a supreme calm state of being, No yelling caused no tears, and heads got cut, faces were happy for a about 15minutes. Then they started balking about another planned activity...:r:
:-D
 

Veloise

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And here I was wondering how I'd handle Mother's Day, coming right up. (No kids, regrets.) I needed to read some of these comments this week.
 

kjel

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ZG you absolutely did the right thing and of course your son was upset because he is no longer playing by his rules and his world isn't running according to his plan. Stay strong and don't back down and don't let him curse you either. Accepting personal responsibility for one's actions isn't as inherent as we would all like to think it is. We all know grown people who still won't accept responsibility for what they do. As a parent you can only mete out awards and consequences for your kid taking care of their business.
 

Flying Monkeys

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Keep the chin up ZG and RJ...it is the right course of action. We are supposed to be the parents....if we try to just be freinds or give-in during a moment of feeling sorry for them or ourselves, we lose. I have been going through the 'I want the internet in my room' thing with my kids for a while. I watched several shows on kids and cyberspace and one thing they always say, 'the internet access stays in a famialy area where there is no hiding what a child might be doing'. I am one who belives that the internet is predatory toward my childeren. Good luck.
 

JNA

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A family that I know (and trust) has five daughters (three of them teenagers) and their computer is in the open dinning room/kitchen.
So keep to your principles ZG and RJ. I have faith in you both.
 

Queen B

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We live in the Computer Wizzards house but we have pulled both of the girls computers for bad grades. Actually we just took the power cords. Then they still have to look at them in their rooms.. We have at least two other computers up stairs that they can use but they have to ask.
 

Zoning Goddess

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Thanks for the input, ya'll. Today went a little better. The kid argued a bit about school and then went; came home and asked about the computer and when I said only if you use it in the nook, he said never mind. He's in his room, which was surprisingly clean this morning. We rearranged the furniture so if I just open the door, I can see everything; before, the bed jutted out of the side wall, so it might look neat from the door, but was trashed with dirty dishes, soda cans, etc on the other side.

He is desperately unhappy and that's hard for a parent to see. But I see no other options than to tell him it's only because I care, and then to stand firm.
 

kjel

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I just got a call from the vice prinicpal letting me know that the resident teenager took it upon herself to skip the same class all last week :-@ She thought she was being smart by offering up the excuse that she skipped class to make up work for another one. Wrong answer. I asked the VP how detention worked at the school and he said it was 9-12 on Saturday and I told him to sign her up for the next two Saturdays. He said he liked my style. She however did not. Wait 'til I get home.....
 

Maister

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Child Psychology

Help help help!!! I've got a problem!

We've had several deaths in the family recently. This morning our 3 yr old is sick and we were going to take him to the pediatrician. When it was announced where he was going he just absolutely freaked out and was inconsolable for almost an hour (he's normally a reasonably well-behaved toddler). He fought being put into the car as if his life was at stake! Turns out that's exactly what he thought. No amount of reasoning or explanation could calm him down. He used to be real cool about going to the doctor and even looked forward to it but after this last death he's become convinced that when one goes to the doctor, they don't come back.

He's going to have to go to the pediatrician at some point in the future - what can we do to get him past this phobia?
 

dandy_warhol

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No amount of reasoning or explanation could calm him down. He used to be real cool about going to the doctor and even looked forward to it but after this last death he's become convinced that when one goes to the doctor, they don't come back.

He's going to have to go to the pediatrician at some point in the future - what can we do to get him past this phobia?

i'm no child psychologist, nor do i have children. that said, you might want to continue to speak with him regarding why he's scared about it. my nephew is 3 1/2 and when something traumatic happens to him (one time a goat looked at him the wrong way :s:^o)) and it took weeks of reliving the incident and talking it through before he could get over it. there was a lot of him retelling the incident and us just listening. now i realize death is much different from goats, but the same principle may apply.

you may also want to head to the library and find some books about doctors and sit down and read through them with him.

maybe even tell him stories about his favorite Aunt/Uncle whosie who went to the Dr. yesterday and came back home and had dinner, then walked the dog etc. make it normal that people come back from the dr.

my two cents, how ever right or wrong they may be.

oh, you could always try bribing him as well. my parents did that when i was going through a rough patch being left at day care.
 

Veloise

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Take him along on one of your grown-up doctor visits. Got a routine physical coming up? Schedule one soon. Explain it to the staff first, and the MD is sure to play along.

You could also rent some Marcus Welby MD videos, or Dr Kildare (mmmmm...) or any other innocuous "play one on TV" documentary.

And you might try visiting a fire station, to include comments from EMS folk.

(recalling the time toddler niece refused a seatbelt, so her father found a lady cop who explained things)
 

Gedunker

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Good luck. Mine don't mind the ped so long as they can be convinced that there will not be an innoculation. But the dentist, well, that's gotten so out of hand that we don't tell them they have an appointment. They're in the dark until we park in the lot.:r:
 

giff57

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Little ones like that are quick to move on to something else. He may just simply forget about as some time goes by. The other ideas are good ones too.
 

wahday

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Help help help!!! I've got a problem!

We've had several deaths in the family recently. This morning our 3 yr old is sick and we were going to take him to the pediatrician. When it was announced where he was going he just absolutely freaked out and was inconsolable for almost an hour (he's normally a reasonably well-behaved toddler). He fought being put into the car as if his life was at stake! Turns out that's exactly what he thought. No amount of reasoning or explanation could calm him down. He used to be real cool about going to the doctor and even looked forward to it but after this last death he's become convinced that when one goes to the doctor, they don't come back.

He's going to have to go to the pediatrician at some point in the future - what can we do to get him past this phobia?
Good suggestions. I think taking him along to your doctor visits is a great idea. We did that with the dentist to great effect.

Also, while the recent deaths in the family may be at play here (and I don't want to belittle that), don't forget also that he is 3! And he was sick! My daughter is approaching three and is just now experimenting with anger/being intractable in a way my son (who is almost 8) never did (not that he wasn't a difficult child...). I am convinced that at times, she is certifiably insane. It is a time of simultaneously realizing they are independent actors in the world, with indominable wills, and reverting to a more baby-like dependence. Its actually a lot like adolescence, I think - wanting to have the responsibilities of adulthood, but also expecting that one's irresponsible behavior will just be tolerated or dealt with by the parents (yeah, I stayed out all night, and no, I'm not going to clean my room. Why can't you just treat me like an adult!)

So, you may find that the next visit goes fine and that the perfect storm of events - the passing of family members, being sick, being 3 - led to his breakdown, but is not part of a long standing fear of doctors. Also, maybe try talking about it with him at other times when he is not anxious or sick, reminding him or just casually talking about the good work doctors do, etc. If you know any doctors, you can talk about them (doesn't mater what kind) just to point out what great people they are and connect it to a person in his life. I bet you could find a book of that type at the library as well.
 

Maister

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Epilogue: I ended up buying junior a toy doctor's bag, complete with plastic stethascope, thermometer, blood pressure cuff, etc. He absolutely adored it and the next day he asked if he could go to the doctor's office and take his kit with him!
 

ofos

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Epilogue: I ended up buying junior a toy doctor's bag, complete with plastic stethascope, thermometer, blood pressure cuff, etc. He absolutely adored it and the next day he asked if he could go to the doctor's office and take his kit with him!
Oh, now you've gone and done it! Solved one problem but created a new one. You've introduced him to the playing doctor world. You know what that's going to lead to. :D:D:D
 
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Maister - ingenious. I'm glad it worked out. The twins had their 3 year check up yesterday, and my daughter was seriously stressing it. screaming about having her head measured, or laying down to have her height measured. finally, she let her brother measure her head, and then settled down after that - but still. The ped is a tricky issue.

and while I'm in this thread - my SIL, Karen, is watching the kids this morning, and just called.

K: "Is Jack (age 4.5) allowed to pee in the yard?"
Me: *shocked silence* Um, no. Why do you ask?
K: I was just coming down the deck stairs, and he's standing at the bottom, with his pants around his ankles. He told me that his mommy lets him pee outside when there isn't a bathroom nearby.
Me: *vividly remembering every incident where jack has peed on a tree in the park, a good 1/2 mi. from the nearest bathroom.* Um. that rule only applies when we're more than 5 minutes from a bathroom.

sigh.

that said - maister - how goes potty training? Maddie's done - but Brae has been adamant that he only poops in his diapers. :sigh:
 

Maister

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that said - maister - how goes potty training? Maddie's done - but Brae has been adamant that he only poops in his diapers. :sigh:
Causing me much concern. We enrolled him back in April at a pre-school for this fall that is very hard to get into. One of the requirements is that they must be potty trained. We threw a Hail Mary back in April, realizing (hoping) much could change in 5 months. So far he's shown little inclination towards potty training. When he was 2 he demonstrated great interest and actually made some progress with peeing, but when my mother died he suddenly regressed and has shown little interest in using anything but diapers ever since:-(

yeah, I know they are supposed to move at their own pace and you can't make a kid become potty trained without them wanting to.
 

boiker

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Causing me much concern. We enrolled him back in April at a pre-school for this fall that is very hard to get into. One of the requirements is that they must be potty trained. We threw a Hail Mary back in April, realizing (hoping) much could change in 5 months. So far he's shown little inclination towards potty training. When he was 2 he demonstrated great interest and actually made some progress with peeing, but when my mother died he suddenly regressed and has shown little interest in using anything but diapers ever since:-(

yeah, I know they are supposed to move at their own pace and you can't make a kid become potty trained without them wanting to.
My 3.5 year old is causing me the same headache.. Actually, he #2's in the toliet just fine. #1-- he could care less where or how or when he goes. At least I don't have to clean poop off his butt anymore.
 

zman

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Boiker said:
At least I don't have to clean poop off his butt anymore
This thread could be renamed to the Vasecotomy Persuasion Thread ;):-c:-@:-$
 

Gedunker

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So far he's shown little inclination towards potty training.
Whatever, you do -- avoid pull-ups. They are just way, way, way too comfortable when full and if your son is anything like mine, will just poop and keep on playing. Better to stay in regular diapers or get him in "big boy" pants so the discomfort will work in your favor.

Plus, pull-ups are wicked expensive.
 

luckless pedestrian

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This thread could be renamed to the Vasecotomy Persuasion Thread ;):-c:-@:-$
when, at 39 years old, I found out I was pregnant with my 3rd, 3 couple friends of ours permanently prevented themselves from having their 3rd - we have a great influence on people ;)
 

ofos

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K: "Is Jack (age 4.5) allowed to pee in the yard?"
Ah, that brings back memories.

Back in marriage #1, the first couple (with no children of their own at the time) arriving for a party say "Is that your son out in the front yard?" Me, proudly "Why, yes it is." Her, somewhat aghast "When we drove up, he was peeing off the curb." Me, defensively "He's just a boy, they do that."

A couple years later, following the birth of their first, she didn't bother ask at another party if anyone had objections to viewing public breast feeding. Different standards, different sexes, different times.
 

Veloise

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The village has to want to change

Slowly rolling the four-wheeler home, down my tiny street (1-1/2 lanes wide, dead end, parking one side), a small blond girl bursts off a porch on the right. (The residents of that house have a different ethnicity; she doesn't live there, and I've never seen her before.) Walks aimlessly out onto the street, crossing from the right over to the left. I had a clear view of the back of her head. Looks to be about 3 or 4; steady gait but small.

As I passed the porch, her mother (also blond) starts screaming at her. "Casey! CASEY! *epithet*!!"

The kid continues down the street in a zig-zag, and then crosses back, in front of me. Again, at this point I had not glimpsed her face. She got onto the sidewalk on the right. More yelling coming from mom.

I stopped alongside Casey and spoke to her loudly. "You need to look before you cross the street. This is not a playground. Stay on the sidewalk." Continued home.

Mom was on my driveway before I'd finished at the car, talking to her friend (sister?). "I need to find out what this lady yelled at my baby."

We exchanged words, mine explaining that the child never saw my car. "Yes she did! She looked BOTH ways!" Sister said no, she didn't. All I saw was the back of her head.

Mom grew frustrated, alternately yelling at Casey and at me. (I suspect there's an auditory issue.) "You're not to talk to my baby!" Guess she didn't notice the trunkline with measurable ADT just a few houses away from the original porch.

I tried different tacks. Do you live here? "No!!" Where do you live? "What does that matter?!?!" I said I live here, kids play on the street all the time, but they need to learn to watch for cars. (Mom doesn't know that several speeders visit our little cul-de-sac. One of them is the visitational mother of a girl who lives in the house at the very dead end...routinely 20 mph.)

Mom continued yelling at Casey while standing on my driveway. (How is the kid supposed to get the message that "this is a stranger" while they are trespassing like they own the place?)

Finally, as I unlocked my front door, I tried guilt. It does take a village, right? And closed the door behind me.

I can tell what will come next...her male relative, who lives in the last house, will come "talk" to me. And I'll get the "how many children do YOU have??" justification for their lack of common sense and appropriate discipline.
 

Zoning Goddess

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Slowly rolling the four-wheeler home, down my tiny street (1-1/2 lanes wide, dead end, parking one side), a small blond girl bursts off a porch on the right. (The residents of that house have a different ethnicity; she doesn't live there, and I've never seen her before.) Walks aimlessly out onto the street, crossing from the right over to the left. I had a clear view of the back of her head. Looks to be about 3 or 4; steady gait but small.

As I passed the porch, her mother (also blond) starts screaming at her. "Casey! CASEY! *epithet*!!"

The kid continues down the street in a zig-zag, and then crosses back, in front of me. Again, at this point I had not glimpsed her face. She got onto the sidewalk on the right. More yelling coming from mom.

I stopped alongside Casey and spoke to her loudly. "You need to look before you cross the street. This is not a playground. Stay on the sidewalk." Continued home.

Mom was on my driveway before I'd finished at the car, talking to her friend (sister?). "I need to find out what this lady yelled at my baby."

We exchanged words, mine explaining that the child never saw my car. "Yes she did! She looked BOTH ways!" Sister said no, she didn't. All I saw was the back of her head.

Mom grew frustrated, alternately yelling at Casey and at me. (I suspect there's an auditory issue.) "You're not to talk to my baby!" Guess she didn't notice the trunkline with measurable ADT just a few houses away from the original porch.

I tried different tacks. Do you live here? "No!!" Where do you live? "What does that matter?!?!" I said I live here, kids play on the street all the time, but they need to learn to watch for cars. (Mom doesn't know that several speeders visit our little cul-de-sac. One of them is the visitational mother of a girl who lives in the house at the very dead end...routinely 20 mph.)

Mom continued yelling at Casey while standing on my driveway. (How is the kid supposed to get the message that "this is a stranger" while they are trespassing like they own the place?)

Finally, as I unlocked my front door, I tried guilt. It does take a village, right? And closed the door behind me.

I can tell what will come next...her male relative, who lives in the last house, will come "talk" to me. And I'll get the "how many children do YOU have??" justification for their lack of common sense and appropriate discipline.

I was somewhat phobic :-$ teaching my son how to ride his bike safely, how to cross streets, etc. I read a study that said kids normally don't really grasp the dangers and remember to look both ways until they are at least 9, so of course he couldn't cross the street until he was 9.

The "mom" (and I'll use that term loosely) on your street made a big mistake and tried to make you to blame for it.

You need to talk to every neighbor you know ASAP about this visitor and the danger she's put her child in. So that if Mr "Male Relative" comes after you, you will have some corroboration. "Mom" sounds like a freak.
 

Veloise

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...The "mom" (and I'll use that term loosely) on your street made a big mistake and tried to make you to blame for it.

You need to talk to every neighbor you know ASAP about this visitor and the danger she's put her child in. So that if Mr "Male Relative" comes after you, you will have some corroboration. "Mom" sounds like a freak.
Point of clarification: the male relative, Mike, lives here. I think psycho mom is his sister. His nephews/cousins/whatevers have mentioned "we're from the country" and that might be why mom is inattentive. (I could add some more adjectives based on a search of Jeff Foxworthy jokes this morning. The code enforement call, placed when they were using the dead end to bowl with 2-liter bottles and real bowling balls, might have come from my cell phone. Zoning is residential, not befitting of driveway car repair.)

Mike and I are neighborly; I think he understands the issue. (I live here, too. I taught his daughter how to balance a two-wheeler. I am not the threat, and if I was, I'm easy to find. But with all my friends on the PD, they might have some 'splaining to do.)

Might be a lively weekend.
 

Zoning Goddess

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Does everyone else's teenager do f*cking nuts over a short trip. Today I got "Goddammit, I went to Mobile, I went to New Orleans, I go to Orlando, and I am not f*cking going to Key West tomorrow!' sigh... OK, kid you need to travel, see places. He doesn't get it. Like 3 days away from his Xbox is the kiss of death. He actually tried to tell me he will probably die in an airplane accident and then won't I feel guilty! (Like I'm not paranoid enough about planes already...)
 

kjel

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Does everyone else's teenager do f*cking nuts over a short trip. Today I got "Goddammit, I went to Mobile, I went to New Orleans, I go to Orlando, and I am not f*cking going to Key West tomorrow!' sigh... OK, kid you need to travel, see places. He doesn't get it. Like 3 days away from his Xbox is the kiss of death. He actually tried to tell me he will probably die in an airplane accident and then won't I feel guilty! (Like I'm not paranoid enough about planes already...)
Not really. Usually it is more like "Plane? OK where are we going?" There is the tendency to complain once on the ground of boredom but I've learned to stave that off by involving her in the planning of the trip. If she finds something cool for her to see/do usually it's better for both of us. The only thing she misses is ready internet access but since most places have it now and she has an iPod Touch it's not a big deal anymore.
 

kjel

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The last few weeks my daughter and I have been watching ABC Family's The Secret Life of the American Teen. Normally I am not much of a t.v. watcher but this show has done an amazing job of showcasing high school life and has provided the launching point for some pretty interesting discussions between us for which I am very grateful for because some stuff is just hard to talk about in a random way. I can see where some very conservative parents might not like the show due to the issues being dealt with but I think they are pretty representative of what goes on in a typical school (based on the many teens I've employed over the years) and my resident teenager says it is too.
 

btrage

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The last few weeks my daughter and I have been watching ABC Family's The Secret Life of the American Teen. Normally I am not much of a t.v. watcher but this show has done an amazing job of showcasing high school life and has provided the launching point for some pretty interesting discussions between us for which I am very grateful for because some stuff is just hard to talk about in a random way. I can see where some very conservative parents might not like the show due to the issues being dealt with but I think they are pretty representative of what goes on in a typical school (based on the many teens I've employed over the years) and my resident teenager says it is too.
Are you honstly saying that there may be some value in watching TV????? I've been trying to convince everyone of this since I joined Cyburbia. If used correctly and in moderation, TV can be useful just like a lot of things. I just can't understand the "NO TV RULE" people.

But anyways.....my 5 and 2 year old daughters have humbled me by making me realize I have way less paitence than I thougth I had. They make me want to be a better dad. :-D
 

Richmond Jake

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......I have way less paitence than I thought I had.....
[ot]This could be the topic of a poll and discussion thread. You see, I'm incredibly impatience. (I've recognized this trait all my life.) I really have to rein myself in often. ZG is not far behind me.

Are planners impatient people?

Further OT, a commissioner used the term "unpatient" in a public hearing this morning.
[/ot]
 

btrage

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[ot]This could be the topic of a poll and discussion thread. You see, I'm incredibly impatience. (I've recognized this trait all my life.) I really have to rein myself in often. ZG is not far behind me.

Are planners impatient people?

Further OT, a commissioner used the term "unpatient" in a public hearing this morning.
[/ot]
I'm generally a very patient person. I would say that my patience is tested in very few situations, namely my kids. :r:

Professionally, I do get very impatient, but tend to harness the impatience by multi-tasking and jumping from project to project when people just aren't responding.
 

Zoning Goddess

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[ot]This could be the topic of a poll and discussion thread. You see, I'm incredibly impatience. (I've recognized this trait all my life.) I really have to rein myself in often. ZG is not far behind me.

Are planners impatient people?

Further OT, a commissioner used the term "unpatient" in a public hearing this morning.
[/ot]
You are the poster boy for "If you don't get your handicapped shopping cart out of my way , 'I"ll keeeelll you.'" On the other hand, in this town, after you get in line behind 3 people who still write checks.... what you do, you're not responsible for...:-@
 

kjel

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Are you honstly saying that there may be some value in watching TV????? I've been trying to convince everyone of this since I joined Cyburbia. If used correctly and in moderation, TV can be useful just like a lot of things. I just can't understand the "NO TV RULE" people.

But anyways.....my 5 and 2 year old daughters have humbled me by making me realize I have way less paitence than I thougth I had. They make me want to be a better dad. :-D
I don't have a no t.v. rule and I think there is plenty on t.v. that is interesting to watch like on the History Channel, Discovery etc. I just haven't had much time to watch anything regularly having been working and in school full time for the last four years.
 

btrage

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I don't have a no t.v. rule and I think there is plenty on t.v. that is interesting to watch like on the History Channel, Discovery etc. I just haven't had much time to watch anything regularly having been working and in school full time for the last four years.
I wasn't picking on you :) I was actually trying to be a little funny!

I probably should've used a few more smiley faces :-D
 
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