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The NEVERENDING what's on the grill thread

Maister

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It's 90 out. Perfect time to keep the kitchen cool and grill outside on the back patio.

Grill: Weber 'smokey joe' charcoal grill
food: burgers!
grilling beverage: Grolsch (only one bottle then it's Natural Ice)
 

AG74683

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Saturday I grilled salmon, straight on the grate, no planks. Rubbed it in McCormick Grill Mates "Applewood Rub". It was fantastic! Fish is so easy to grill, beats just about any other food, it tells you when its ready to flip.

Was going to grill out some chicken tenders, corn on the cob, and some red bell peppers last night, but it started pouring right before I lit the grill, so I did it all in a pan :not:

I'm going to be buying a gas grill here in the near future. Probably a Weber Q series. I have a Smokey Joe that I've had for years, and it works fine, so I figure a small gas grill will be good too. No need to get anything bigger yet, as I have no covered deck/patio, and have to move everything outside each time I want to grill.

I also bought one of those charcoal chimney's on Friday. MAN am I glad I bought this thing! Cuts my wait time in half!
 

Maister

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I also bought one of those charcoal chimney's on Friday. MAN am I glad I bought this thing! Cuts my wait time in half!
Charcoal chimney? I had to google it. How long does it take to build ash in a charcoal chimney? Not sure how that would work any quicker than piling the charcoals up at the start and then spreading them out after it gets going.
 

AG74683

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Charcoal chimney? I had to google it. How long does it take to build ash in a charcoal chimney? Not sure how that would work any quicker than piling the charcoals up at the start and then spreading them out after it gets going.
I have no clue why it works better, but it does. I've always had problems with the Smokey Joe being insanely slow with ashing over the charcoal. Generally takes around 30-45 minutes to get something going. The chimney had it going in 15, AND I didn't have to use that nasty lighter fluid!

It's also good to have because it gives you something to start cold charcoal in to add to a longer cook if you need to. Adding cold charcoal to hot results in awful smoke.
 

Planit

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On the grill this morning was the cover and a cardboard box to be thrown away.

I had every intention of grilling this weekend but as it turned out Friday's gathering of friends moved to another house (because it grew from 6 to 13 people) and we ordered pizza.
Saturday another friend had a gathering at his house which was really a rescheduled 4th of July party since it rained and had a taco buffet
Last night was an impromptu gathering at another friends house since the pool was closed due to thunder and we ordered Chinese takeout

I hope to grill chicken thighs & legs this week (maybe Thursday)
 

Maister

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I have no clue why it works better, but it does. I've always had problems with the Smokey Joe being insanely slow with ashing over the charcoal. Generally takes around 30-45 minutes to get something going. The chimney had it going in 15, AND I didn't have to use that nasty lighter fluid!

It's also good to have because it gives you something to start cold charcoal in to add to a longer cook if you need to. Adding cold charcoal to hot results in awful smoke.
I've found that Kingsford charcoal with the grooves in it gets ashed over quicker than standard charcoal. Supposedly having more surface to catch and better airflow speeds the process a bit. I've never timed it out but I think it's usually ashed over sufficiently to start grilling in maybe 25 mins. Maybe you should try Kingsford TM charcoal. i wouldn't consider that an 'insane' wait. Besides you can use those 25 minutes to sip beer in preparation!
 

Midori

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Last night I made lamb kofta kebabs, served with cucumber sauce. My whole kitchen still smells amazing.
 

AG74683

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I've found that Kingsford charcoal with the grooves in it gets ashed over quicker than standard charcoal. Supposedly having more surface to catch and better airflow speeds the process a bit. I've never timed it out but I think it's usually ashed over sufficiently to start grilling in maybe 25 mins. Maybe you should try Kingsford TM charcoal. i wouldn't consider that an 'insane' wait. Besides you can use those 25 minutes to sip beer in preparation!
Oh yeah, I only use Kingsford. There's no other kind of charcoal as far as I'm concerned. I think the chimney was a good idea, especially when I move towards the WSM smoker, which I hope to do in the next few months.
 

btrage

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I was going to make sloppy joes tonight. But then I thought, what the hell am I doing. It's summer. Let's turn that pound of ground sirloin into some burgers on the grill instead. Save the sloppy joe for when it's cold.
 

Maister

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Last night I made lamb kofta kebabs, served with cucumber sauce. My whole kitchen still smells amazing.
Last night we had marinated pork loin and this morning the kitchen still smelled awesome. It was a nice reminder.
 

wahday

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Last weekend I made pizza on the grill. So awesome!

Otherwise its your typical corn, steak, chicken and potato(e) cookout pantheon this summer.
 

JNA

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On vacation family had
Hamburger with salsa mixed in
London Broil
Fish - three times
skinless Chicken breasts
 

michaelskis

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This coming weekend is a barbecue competition in our area. It got me thinking about how awesome it would be for dinner on a hot day. Additionally, grilling a real barbecue brisket is something that I have wanted to try for quite a while.

Anyone have any tips?
 

Suburb Repairman

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This coming weekend is a barbecue competition in our area. It got me thinking about how awesome it would be for dinner on a hot day. Additionally, grilling a real barbecue brisket is something that I have wanted to try for quite a while.

Anyone have any tips?
Smoking brisket is one of the few things that I'm a "good Texan" about. I don't do it often because I'm a perfectionist and have incredibly high anxiety while smoking brisket, plus I only like doing it if we're having a decent-sized group over. I should honestly consider an electric smoker just to cut down on my anxiety. But I'm quite good at it.



Use choice-grade beef or better. I suggest certified angus. While it isn't critical, I age mine in the fridge for about 30 days if I can--the enzymes will help tenderize the meat. Check for a "date packed" label--the older, the better. For a whole brisket use the 1 lb per person uncooked rule. It'll work out to about 1/2 lb per person once cooked & trimmed.

Trim the fat cap to about 1/4 inch or a little less.

Separate the muscles if you are using a whole brisket. This reduces cooking time and allows you to take the flat (lean side which cooks faster) off the heat before the point (marbled side which cooks slower). Otherwise you risk the flat drying out.

Slather in cooking oil (spices are usually oil-soluble and this helps keep it from sticking to the grill)

Apply a good spice rub. Here's my recipe converted to proportional parts (I use teaspoons):
9 parts coarsely ground black pepper
3 parts granulated white sugar
3 parts onion powder
2 parts mustard powder
2 parts garlic powder
2 parts ancho powder
1 part chipotle powder

Pump the brisket. Use beef broth and inject parallel to the grain.

Cook over indirect heat for about 8 hours at about 300 degrees (you might opt for lower temp & longer process if you are new or not confident about the meat quality, like about 250 for 10 hours). I don't know what your wood options are in Michigan; I use pecan with a little mesquite.

Mop with beef broth, water or apple juice throughout the process. Wet meat holds more smoke flavor.

Pull the meat off when the internal temperature is about 200 or just slightly above. Wrap it in foil and place it in an oven or insulated cooler for a couple of hours. This helps with tenderizing and buys you time until everyone is ready to eat.

Slice perpendicular to the grain.
 

michaelskis

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Smoking brisket is one of the few things that I'm a "good Texan" about. I don't do it often because I'm a perfectionist and have incredibly high anxiety while smoking brisket, plus I only like doing it if we're having a decent-sized group over. I should honestly consider an electric smoker just to cut down on my anxiety. But I'm quite good at it.



Use choice-grade beef or better. I suggest certified angus. While it isn't critical, I age mine in the fridge for about 30 days if I can--the enzymes will help tenderize the meat. Check for a "date packed" label--the older, the better. For a whole brisket use the 1 lb per person uncooked rule. It'll work out to about 1/2 lb per person once cooked & trimmed.

Trim the fat cap to about 1/4 inch or a little less.

Separate the muscles if you are using a whole brisket. This reduces cooking time and allows you to take the flat (lean side which cooks faster) off the heat before the point (marbled side which cooks slower). Otherwise you risk the flat drying out.

Slather in cooking oil (spices are usually oil-soluble and this helps keep it from sticking to the grill)

Apply a good spice rub. Here's my recipe converted to proportional parts (I use teaspoons):
9 parts coarsely ground black pepper
3 parts granulated white sugar
3 parts onion powder
2 parts mustard powder
2 parts garlic powder
2 parts ancho powder
1 part chipotle powder

Pump the brisket. Use beef broth and inject parallel to the grain.

Cook over indirect heat for about 8 hours at about 300 degrees (you might opt for lower temp & longer process if you are new or not confident about the meat quality, like about 250 for 10 hours). I don't know what your wood options are in Michigan; I use pecan with a little mesquite.

Mop with beef broth, water or apple juice throughout the process. Wet meat holds more smoke flavor.

Pull the meat off when the internal temperature is about 200 or just slightly above. Wrap it in foil and place it in an oven or insulated cooler for a couple of hours. This helps with tenderizing and buys you time until everyone is ready to eat.

Slice perpendicular to the grain.

Awesome, but what is ancho powder?
 

Suburb Repairman

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Awesome, but what is ancho powder?
Damn yankee... :texas: Ancho powder is made from a type of mild-medium heat chili pepper, specifically a dried poblano, that has a smokey flavor. You can probably substitute boring ol' yankee chili powder. :p
 

michaelskis

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Hey, I am from the UP. Up there we have two spices, salt and pepper. :(

On the other hand, I can make a pasty on the grill, open fire pit (if I have tinfoil), or the oven.
 

JNA

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While on vacation I had

Grilled chicken breast,
London Broil,
Salmon,
Tilapia for fish tacos
 

rcgplanner

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Slightly OT but what are your best picks for a budget grill, preferably gas. I currently have a Patio Bistro electric grill that does a pretty decent job but wouldn't mind a gas grill where I can actually set up different cooking zones.
 

Planit

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There's a little upper end restaurant here on Sunday evenings in the summer has a grill menu. If you order that, they bring you a platter of meats - usually pieces of chicken, a couple pork chops, a couple of 3 different cuts of beef, a couple different fish and ask you which you'd like - then they take it a grill it for you right there to the side of the patio. You also go inside to the salad bar, vegetable bar and dessert bar to complete your meal. The price is based on the meat selected.
 

michaelskis

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Slightly OT but what are your best picks for a budget grill, preferably gas. I currently have a Patio Bistro electric grill that does a pretty decent job but wouldn't mind a gas grill where I can actually set up different cooking zones.
Here you go. LINK



In all seriousness We bought a Weber Genesis 3-Burner for my dad a while back. It works awesome and is worth the extra money. LINK
 

Maister

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I'm devoted to Weber grills. They make great, durable, well-built products, plain and simple.
 

Suburb Repairman

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I'm devoted to Weber grills. They make great, durable, well-built products, plain and simple.
Yep. I've concluded that grills are one area where you are better off saving a bit of money and buying quality.
 

Maister

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Fired up the ol' Smoky Joe twice this weekend, once for sausages and once for pork chops. The pork chops were a little tough. I might not have cooked them quite long enough (that or they were just dried out freezer burnt from being in the freezer too long).

I plan to do lots of charcoal grilling this summer and I believe the family intends to get me a(nother) larger charcoal grill for my birthday. Any suggestions?
 

Planit

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Last night on the grill:

okra
yellow squash
black drum fillets



It was so very good! I hadn't tried to grill okra before, but it was really good for a first attempt. Going to embellish some for the next round and serve it as an appetizer.
 

Suburb Repairman

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Last night on the grill:

okra
yellow squash
black drum fillets



It was so very good! I hadn't tried to grill okra before, but it was really good for a first attempt. Going to embellish some for the next round and serve it as an appetizer.
I'm curious about grilling okra... how did you season it, did you slice it first, and about how much time were they on the grill? My okra plants have produced a stupid amount of okra, which I usually fry or saute. I'm not really a fan of pickling/canning it.
 

Maister

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BTW I got a Weber Jumbo Joe (22") for our grilling needs. I could have waited until my birthday at the end of August to get it as a gift but it made more sense to get the grill earlier in the summer to maximize its use. So far I'm quite pleased with its performance. My FIL just got a dual-fuel charcoal/propane grill. Gas for when you're in a hurry, and charcoal for when you want the very best taste and don't mind waiting a little bit.

I also want to put in a plug for charcoal chimneys. I never saw the utility in them before but swear by them now that I've had a chance to use ours. Charcoal heats up more quickly, and burns more evenly too. Plus, because they require only a couple sheets of newspaper to start a fire you avoid that slight chemical taste/aroma sometimes associated with the use of lighter fluid.
 

kjel

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BTW I got a Weber Jumbo Joe (22") for our grilling needs. I could have waited until my birthday at the end of August to get it as a gift but it made more sense to get the grill earlier in the summer to maximize its use. So far I'm quite pleased with its performance. My FIL just got a dual-fuel charcoal/propane grill. Gas for when you're in a hurry, and charcoal for when you want the very best taste and don't mind waiting a little bit.

I also want to put in a plug for charcoal chimneys. I never saw the utility in them before but swear by them now that I've had a chance to use ours. Charcoal heats up more quickly, and burns more evenly too. Plus, because they require only a couple sheets of newspaper to start a fire you avoid that slight chemical taste/aroma sometimes associated with the use of lighter fluid.
I have the same Weber. We debated back and forth whether to get a gas grill or a charcoal grill. We opted for the Weber because charcoal tastes better, I would be really pissed if someone stole a $300 gas grill from my backyard (I live in the hood), and with a chimney starter it only takes 10 minutes for the charcoal to be ready. We use hardwood lump charcoal rather than briquettes.
 

AG74683

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I have the same Weber. We debated back and forth whether to get a gas grill or a charcoal grill. We opted for the Weber because charcoal tastes better, I would be really pissed if someone stole a $300 gas grill from my backyard (I live in the hood), and with a chimney starter it only takes 10 minutes for the charcoal to be ready. We use hardwood lump charcoal rather than briquettes.
I bought a Weber Q120 that I use occasionally. It's a small portable gas grill. I don't use it often, but it's nice for those days during the week that I just want something grilled. I store all my grills inside because I don't have a deck or patio.

I actually have 3 because I am insane. A Weber Smokey Joe Gold, Weber Q120, and a Weber Performer Platinum.
 

Planit

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I'm curious about grilling okra... how did you season it, did you slice it first, and about how much time were they on the grill? My okra plants have produced a stupid amount of okra, which I usually fry or saute. I'm not really a fan of pickling/canning it.
wash & paper towel dry
slit long-ways
season with olive oil, salt, pepper & blackening spices to taste
grill hotter (rather than lower) and turn until exterior is charred
eat 'em up yum

Pretty simple. I put them on the grill first and turned them, then the yellow squash, then the fish.


I'm going to trying different spice combinations and other ideas for appetizer dish (and even roasting because we love veggies that way too).
 

Coragus

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I can't grill or bar-b-que (there's a difference, trust me) at my apartment, so I don't get many chances to cook out. However . . .

1. On July 4, I brought two pounds of hamburger and a pork loin to my parents to grill. I was wondering why I was bringing so much meat for four adults (I had a friend over) when my Mom made a couple calls. Suddenly, I had to add Kogel's Viennas to the grill as we were joined by two aunts, an uncle, and a cousin! It turned into a great day.

2. Yesterday, I went over to the new girlfriend's place. The first thing she asked me was how to start her grill. Suddenly, I found myself outside with a cold beer in hand and manning the grill an cooking a pack of Ballpark Franks for me, said new girlfriend, and three kids. Her next door neighbors popped over to say hi and ate too. Good times!
 

Planit

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Suddenly, I found myself outside with a cold beer in hand and manning the grill an cooking a pack of Ballpark Franks for me, said new girlfriend, and three kids. Her next door neighbors popped over to say hi and ate too. Good times!
That, right there, is one of the best things in the world.
 

DVD

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I'm using a gas grill, mostly because I'm too lazy to light up charcoal. When I did have a nice charcoal smoker, I swore by the chimney. That thing will light up faster and easier than anything with no lighter fluid. My gas grill has a side fire box attachment you can buy for smoking or grilling. My wife said she would buy one for me sometime when we bought the grill. I'm still waiting on my side fire box and my hammock. I might actually have to go buy these things myself!
 

Maister

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That, right there, is one of the best things in the world.
. On July 4, I brought two pounds of hamburger and a pork loin to my parents to grill. I was wondering why I was bringing so much meat for four adults (I had a friend over) when my Mom made a couple calls. Suddenly, I had to add Kogel's Viennas to the grill as we were joined by two aunts, an uncle, and a cousin! It turned into a great day.

Yesterday, I went over to the new girlfriend's place. The first thing she asked me was how to start her grill. Suddenly, I found myself outside with a cold beer in hand and manning the grill an cooking a pack of Ballpark Franks for me, said new girlfriend, and three kids. Her next door neighbors popped over to say hi and ate too. Good times!
This. One of the best collateral benefits to having a grill (especially the more leisurely times associated with charcoal grills) is that it's a sort of social conduit. Think about it, pleasant food smells waft into the neighborhood. The neighbors lean over the fence, see you on turning steaks with one hand, a Bell's Amber Ale in the other, and before you know it you've got company. An instant impromptu party!

This past weekend I was grilling out back and our neighbors were having company over for a swim in their pool. They smelled the grill and invited us over for a dip too. They supplied us with a package of hot dogs which I was more than happy to grill up for them and a shindig ensued. Good times indeed!
 

Richmond Jake

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I've never had success using a charcoal chimney. I plan ahead and use fuel. I also use a blend of hardwood lumps and charcoal.

We grilled meat for fajitas tonight. Good eating.
 

Richmond Jake

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Here's the grill we bought over two years ago.



It's not that clean anymore.
 

AG74683

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Here's the grill we bought over two years ago.

It's not that clean anymore.
Should have went with the Platinum! It includes a sweet built in gas torch to light your coals. It takes the standard camping propane bottles. I really like it.
 

luckless pedestrian

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Here's the grill we bought over two years ago.



It's not that clean anymore.
That's a sweet setup

Weber charcoal here too - chimney use, yes, though when I grill at the parks here, I use chemicals, the kids love that

we made chicken that was coated with an inch of Hellman's and salt and pepper and it was awesome - had pesto/ziti on the side with a green salad - a perfect dinner
 

AG74683

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Had my Platinum out all weekend! Smoked 3 bone in skin on chicken breasts with some applewood for about 2 hours on Saturday. Real delicious stuff!! They were brined for 2 days, then rubbed in Weber's Garlic Siracha rub for a day.

Sunday I smoked a rack of spare ribs. Rubbed in McCormick's Memphis Pit BBQ and smoked with hickory for 6 hours. They were good, but not the best I've ever made. I think I might try the 3-2-1 method next time and wrap them up with some BBQ sauce. I normally prefer my ribs to be dry rubbed. I also used too much hickory, so the smoke is a little overpowering, not too bad though.
 

Maister

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I grilled lunch and dinner on the same day this past weekend! I'm becoming a grill-aholic big time. Starting to try my hand at more advanced grilling techniques like setting up dual-zone fires (great for porterhouse steaks where you want less heat on the tenderloin part of the cut) and cooking thicker pieces of meat with indirect heat. Picked up a couple more porterhouse steaks this weekend. I've always liked teriyaki marinades for steaks but am developing a taste for dry rubs now.
 

Planit

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King Mackerel fillets tonight.
Just little lemon pepper and kosher salt.
 

kjel

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Grilled some marinated boneless chicken on Saturday along with corn on the cob, onions, and sweet peppers. All turned out awesome and my husband admitted that I am the better grillmaster :D

I have some nice steaks and pork chops in the fridge, will probably grill one of them tomorrow. The weather is supposed to be fabulous all week.

My secret to using the chimney starter? Use a brown paper grocery bag torn and wadded up instead of newsprint. It burns hotter and longer and really gets the coals going.
 

kms

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My secret to using the chimney starter? Use a brown paper grocery bag torn and wadded up instead of newsprint. It burns hotter and longer and really gets the coals going.
I dump the charcoal into a bin and use pieces of the bag in the chimney starter.
 

Maister

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An observation: last year I could get a bag of my favorite charcoal (Kingsford) on sale for $8.99. This year the sale price appears to be $9.99. Has anyone else noticed if the price of charcoal jumped this year in their neck of the woods?
 

Maister

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2016/17 has turned out to be the Winter That Wasn't for large parts of the US. We've had several unprecedented opportunities for backyard grilling sessions where normally we'd be ice skating. The sad part about it is that I've run out of charcoal from our stock purchased last year and what little charcoal that's still on the stores shelves is being sold at full price. Sales on charcoal don't usually start for at least a couple more months around here.

 

The Terminator

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F****ng PORTERHOUSE STEAKS from the Butcher Counter at Loblaws. Ill pan sear it because its still too chilly for grilling.
 
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