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The NEVERENDING what's on the grill thread

Salmissra

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What grill?

We're going out on a date tonight. Maybe I'll get a grilled something for dinner . . . .
 

WSU MUP Student

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^ I like that idea. I had never thought of making cornish game hens on the grill. I bet my daughter would get a kick out of that and having her own.
 

AG74683

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Last night - cornish game hens:
I've been meaning to try this for a while. I haven't busted out the grill in what seems like months. I've basically been out of town every weekend since August.
 

Bubba

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The game hens - marinate or rub as you choose, split, grill the halves skin side up - indirect heat (medium), ~45 minutes. I have a cast iron humidifier box I use that helps keep the birds moist (white wine with rosemary sprigs this time).
 

Hink

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So I am trying to convince my beautiful wife to let me get a Yoder Smoker. It isn't going so well. Anyone else have something like this and have great stories about how it has changed their lives and that I am just less of a man without one? I could use some support...
 

AG74683

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So I am trying to convince my beautiful wife to let me get a Yoder Smoker. It isn't going so well. Anyone else have something like this and have great stories about how it has changed their lives and that I am just less of a man without one? I could use some support...
My God, those are expensive! I've had my eye on a Weber Smokey Mountain for a few years, and I've struggled with spending the 3-400 for one of those...
 

Hink

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My God, those are expensive! I've had my eye on a Weber Smokey Mountain for a few years, and I've struggled with spending the 3-400 for one of those...
Whose freakin' side are you on? They are American made, solid, and produce sweet, sweet meatstuffs. They are a bargain, good sir, a bargain.
 

Planit

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So I am trying to convince my beautiful wife to let me get a Yoder Smoker. It isn't going so well. Anyone else have something like this and have great stories about how it has changed their lives and that I am just less of a man without one? I could use some support...
My God, those are expensive! I've had my eye on a Weber Smokey Mountain for a few years, and I've struggled with spending the 3-400 for one of those...
Whose freakin' side are you on? They are American made, solid, and produce sweet, sweet meatstuffs. They are a bargain, good sir, a bargain.
There is no way you can hold a gathering at the house without one of these. Just think of the savory selections you will produce and the gathering of friends to watch college football on the deck.

You want to have friends? You want to eat well? You want this!

(just let me know when I can help break it in)
 

Hink

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See now that is support. THAT is how you help a guy out. :D
 

DVD

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More importantly, think of how much cooking you, Hink, will be doing and how much less cooking Hink's wife will have to do. Plus it's outside so the kitchen won't get messed up.

At least these arguments would work in my house.
 

Maister

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So I grilled both days this weekend. Saturday I grilled some burgers and last night we had two different types of sausages (pineapple & pork and cherry & pork). This normally wouldn't be that unusual but for the fact that we're talking about two consecutive days...in December!

It wasn't quite 'cold' out (~mid 40's) but the temps had dropped enough to notice the cook times were longer than in August. the biggest challenge, however, was the lack of light. I started the charcoal around 5:25 p.m. on Saturday and managed to overcook some of the burgers because it was getting too dark to see if the patties needed flipping. I didn't replace the back porch light after it burned out a couple years ago because the motion sensor-activated light was getting annoying (goes off every time a chipmunk farts), but it looks like I'll have to replace that back porch light after all.
 

kms

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I grilled last night, too. I took the chicken off the grill before it got too dark because the coals were dying, and I finished it in the oven with some other things that were there.

Last year, I grilled on Dec. 23 or 24 because it was so warm outside.
 

mendelman

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They have these things called 'outdoor lights' that seem quite popular and get extra use this time of year. :p

I grilled on Saturday afternoon, since it was in the mid-50s here...with my gas grill...you luddites. ;)
 

Bubba

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High of 45 in the ATL today, and I'll still be out grilling sausages tonight.

Gas grill and outdoor lights, you amateurs. :D
 

AG74683

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Has anyone ever smoked a turkey breast? I'm going to try 2 of them for the office Christmas party but I've never done them before. I might try to smoke one this weekend and see how it goes.
 

kms

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Has anyone ever smoked a turkey breast? I'm going to try 2 of them for the office Christmas party but I've never done them before. I might try to smoke one this weekend and see how it goes.
My son and I smoked a turkey for Thanksgiving, and everyone seemed to prefer it.

If you use a whole one, split it so it lays flat on the pan. We brined it over night and put cajun seasoning on it before it went in the smoker. The instructions said to cook it over a relatively high heat (325), so I'd say that it was roasted with smoke instead of smoking it at a lower temp. It was very good. A 12-lb bird was finished in about 3 hours.
 

AG74683

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So I went with the turkey breast for the Christmas Party tomorrow. I got two fresh (not frozen) breasts around 5.5 lb each.They are bone in though, so I'm a little concerned that there won't be enough meat. I brined them for about 12 hours and just took them out this afternoon. I'll be doing a brown sugar rub on one, and a cajun type rub on the other. I plan on putting them on tomorrow morning and having them ready for noon. It's supposed to rain but I can work around that. I didn't get to do a test run so I hope this works.
 

kms

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So I went with the turkey breast for the Christmas Party tomorrow. I got two fresh (not frozen) breasts around 5.5 lb each.They are bone in though, so I'm a little concerned that there won't be enough meat. I brined them for about 12 hours and just took them out this afternoon. I'll be doing a brown sugar rub on one, and a cajun type rub on the other. I plan on putting them on tomorrow morning and having them ready for noon. It's supposed to rain but I can work around that. I didn't get to do a test run so I hope this works.
Use a good meat thermometer. I think you’ll be good.
 

AG74683

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Use a good meat thermometer. I think you’ll be good.
Borrowed a Thermapen from Environmental Health just in case. Got the on the grill at around 7. I ended up having to pull them off at 10:30 and finish in the oven, I ran out of time and they stalled pretty heavy at 150. They were fantastic!
 

Maister

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I watched a youtube video on how to roast chestnuts over a charcoal grill. Unfortunately mine got all burnt and dried out when I tried.:(
 

Maister

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So on Saturday I grilled a pork tenderloin. It was super easy and quick. Here's what I did:
trim fat
butterfly tenderloin in approximate half.
place tenderloin in plastic wrap and use meat mallet to pound into 1/2" thickness
apply dry rub
place on grill (direct heat) for ~4 mins per side (must drink a PBR while waiting to flip. Failure to do so will pretty much ruin it)
Eat
 

Planit

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I did not get to grill this weekend and was not pleased about that. Now I have a pack of pork chops that went in the freezer yesterday instead of the grill.

Plans changed and other things occurred (but I wanted to grill).
 

Planit

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I did not get to grill this weekend and was not pleased about that. Now I have a pack of pork chops that went in the freezer yesterday instead of the grill.

Plans changed and other things occurred (but I wanted to grill).
I grilled those pork chops last night & they were delicious. I wanted to grill some veggies to but that was not an option.

I grilled them just the right time too. It took 1 beer from the time I lit the grill until the chops came off to rest. A thunderstorm blew in as we finished eating too so the timing was right all around.




I was going to post this on the smoker thread, but knew that would be inappropriate so I found this grill thread & low and behold the last one was my pork chops post. That is weird, but it is Friday of a short week.
 

Maister

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I received a Bakerstone pizza box on Father's Day. It's essentially a way to allow one's gas or charcoal grill to function as a pizza oven. I plan to assemble it tonight and try it out. I've read numerous reviews and none had anything bad to say about it.
One of the reasons homemade pizza is never quite as good as what you get in a restaurant is because the oven temps at home don't get nearly as high as that found in a commercial pizza oven. The pizza box addresses that deficiency and creates a cooking environment where temps get up to 700 degrees. After I assemble the box, I'll load up my 22" Weber Jumbo Joe with hickory charcoal, put the box on top and plan to make a pepperoni, sausage, green pepper, onion, and black olive pizza. Supposedly the finished product has a genuine wood-fired pizza texture and taste. I'll let you all know how it goes.

 

michaelskis

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I received a Bakerstone pizza box on Father's Day. It's essentially a way to allow one's gas or charcoal grill to function as a pizza oven. I plan to assemble it tonight and try it out. I've read numerous reviews and none had anything bad to say about it.
One of the reasons homemade pizza is never quite as good as what you get in a restaurant is because the oven temps at home don't get nearly as high as that found in a commercial pizza oven. The pizza box addresses that deficiency and creates a cooking environment where temps get up to 700 degrees. After I assemble the box, I'll load up my 22" Weber Jumbo Joe with hickory charcoal, put the box on top and plan to make a pepperoni, sausage, green pepper, onion, and black olive pizza. Supposedly the finished product has a genuine wood-fired pizza texture and taste. I'll let you all know how it goes.

That looks AWESOME! Please report back on how it works!



We have found that because of the heat outside and our desire not to heat up the inside, we now grill 90% of our dinners. We have even cooked frozen chicken strips using tin-foil and indirect heat. It takes longer but prevents us from turning on the oven.
 

Bubba

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I received a Bakerstone pizza box on Father's Day. It's essentially a way to allow one's gas or charcoal grill to function as a pizza oven. I plan to assemble it tonight and try it out. I've read numerous reviews and none had anything bad to say about it.
One of the reasons homemade pizza is never quite as good as what you get in a restaurant is because the oven temps at home don't get nearly as high as that found in a commercial pizza oven. The pizza box addresses that deficiency and creates a cooking environment where temps get up to 700 degrees. After I assemble the box, I'll load up my 22" Weber Jumbo Joe with hickory charcoal, put the box on top and plan to make a pepperoni, sausage, green pepper, onion, and black olive pizza. Supposedly the finished product has a genuine wood-fired pizza texture and taste. I'll let you all know how it goes.

You lost me at "black olive" - everyone knows that green olives would be the proper accompaniment for the rest of those toppings.
 

WSU MUP Student

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I received a Bakerstone pizza box on Father's Day. It's essentially a way to allow one's gas or charcoal grill to function as a pizza oven. I plan to assemble it tonight and try it out. I've read numerous reviews and none had anything bad to say about it.
One of the reasons homemade pizza is never quite as good as what you get in a restaurant is because the oven temps at home don't get nearly as high as that found in a commercial pizza oven. The pizza box addresses that deficiency and creates a cooking environment where temps get up to 700 degrees. After I assemble the box, I'll load up my 22" Weber Jumbo Joe with hickory charcoal, put the box on top and plan to make a pepperoni, sausage, green pepper, onion, and black olive pizza. Supposedly the finished product has a genuine wood-fired pizza texture and taste. I'll let you all know how it goes.

We make pizza on the grill quite a bit. We don't use a pizza box though I've heard good things about them too. My one tip is to grill the dough with the top side down first for a couple minutes before you put the sauce and toppings on it and then put it back on the grill bottom side down.


We have found that because of the heat outside and our desire not to heat up the inside, we now grill 90% of our dinners. We have even cooked frozen chicken strips using tin-foil and indirect heat. It takes longer but prevents us from turning on the oven.
We make most of our dinners outside on the grill this time of year too. Lately I've realized I can put my cast iron pan on to the grill and use it just like I would the stove top and then when I close the lid on the grill it gets really really hot in there with the iron pan. It worked really well for fajitas!
 

Maister

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We make most of our dinners outside on the grill this time of year too. Lately I've realized I can put my cast iron pan on to the grill and use it just like I would the stove top and then when I close the lid on the grill it gets really really hot in there with the iron pan. It worked really well for fajitas!
Dutch ovens are also great for this. I've prepared stews, beans, and soups in this manner a number of times.
 

Maister

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I have never in my life seen a pizza with green olives.
Black olives are pretty standard where the pizza industry is concerned. Of the half dozen pizza places we frequent only one offers green olives. But they are a thing - frequently 'gourmet' pizza places offer green olives as a topping.

Given the choice between eating olives plain I'd choose green olives with pimientos every time, but when it comes to pizza I'm going to stick with the traditional black olives.
 

Planit

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Black olives are one of Mrs. P's favorite pizza toppings. Not for me.


One of the main reasons we got the new grill is to do a lot more grilling of various food substances. It had gotten to the point where I couldn't adjust the flame on the old one. I could still grill a great steak of pork chop, but after 20 years, I had learned the hot and not-as-hot areas of that grill.
 

Big Owl

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I have never in my life seen a pizza with green olives.
A local place has a deluxe pizza that has pepperoni, Italian sausage, beef, ham, bacon, onion, mushroom, green pepper, black and green olives. No one at my house likes it except for me. It's my default home alone pizza.
 

kms

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We make pizza on the grill quite a bit. We don't use a pizza box though I've heard good things about them too. My one tip is to grill the dough with the top side down first for a couple minutes before you put the sauce and toppings on it and then put it back on the grill bottom side down.




We make most of our dinners outside on the grill this time of year too. Lately I've realized I can put my cast iron pan on to the grill and use it just like I would the stove top and then when I close the lid on the grill it gets really really hot in there with the iron pan. It worked really well for fajitas!
We make pizza on the grill the way you do.

It’s rare that I turn on AC, so I can make just about anything on the grill to avoid heating the house. It’s really just an oven or stove with a different heat source.
 

Maister

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Well, plans ended up changing and I did not get to try the pizza box yet but I did bbq (snake method) a couple racks of St Louis ribs yesterday. The racks were cut so long their ends extended over the coals a little and the last 2-3 ribs ended up getting charred. :( The other 85% turned out just fine.. :)
 

WSU MUP Student

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Last night I was home alone. Our fridge is pretty bare at the moment since we've been spending so much time at the in-laws house and I didn't feel like going out to dinner or to the grocery store but also didn't want a hot dog or sausage (my quick and easy grilling standby). Luckily we had an old bag of shrimp in the freezer that we had bought for something last month and never used. I then scrounged through the fridge to see what I could make to go with them and found half an onion, some mini peppers that were about near the end of their useful life, half a tub of old salsa, and some leftover corn and black beans from when we had quesadillas last week. I cut up the veggies and mixed in some pepper and olive oil and through them on the grill in the cast iron pan and then tossed the shrimp with the dregs of the olive oil and a bit of old bay seasoning and garlic salt and cooked them for a minute on each side then put them in the pan as well and lastly I dumped in the salsa and corn and beans and grilled everything a few more minutes until the liquid from the salsa boiled away. Perfect!

I ended up just eating everything out of a big bowl but if I had some flour tortillas or taco shells they would have been great with that. Thinking back on it now, I had some tortilla chips, I could have dumped everything over them on a plate and it it like nachos.

I'm loving cooking with the skillet on the grill and the salsa worked great as a ready-made seasoning. I saw somebody use salsa on the grill like that on a cooking segment on the morning news a few weeks ago and now I wish I had known that trick earlier.
 

luckless pedestrian

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We use a choice of 3 sauces

Homemade barbecue sauce from an old cookbook from the 40's - the secret is horseradish
St Louis sauce recipe from Pierre Franey's 60 minute gourmet
Dinosaur Barbecue sauce in the bottle (no high fructose corn syrup) or Paul Newman's original

I used to make a recipe for barbecue sauce from Madhur Jaffrey with homemade peanut sauce on the side that was stellar but my live in MIL hates it so alas I have not made it in years
 

RandomPlanner

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We use a choice of 3 sauces

Homemade barbecue sauce from an old cookbook from the 40's - the secret is horseradish
St Louis sauce recipe from Pierre Franey's 60 minute gourmet
Dinosaur Barbecue sauce in the bottle (no high fructose corn syrup) or Paul Newman's original

I used to make a recipe for barbecue sauce from Madhur Jaffrey with homemade peanut sauce on the side that was stellar but my live in MIL hates it so alas I have not made it in years
Ahhh, Dinosaur BBQ is the best!!
 

michaelskis

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I am now to the point were we are grilling more than we are using or stove...

But I have a question for everyone... do you clean your grill before each use, or after you are done with it before you put the cover back on? Personally, I do it as soon as I take the food off then wipe it down with wet paper towel after dinner once it is cooled down.
 

WSU MUP Student

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I am now to the point were we are grilling more than we are using or stove...

But I have a question for everyone... do you clean your grill before each use, or after you are done with it before you put the cover back on? Personally, I do it as soon as I take the food off then wipe it down with wet paper towel after dinner once it is cooled down.
I usually try to clean it after each use. When I am done grilling and all the food has been removed I turn the heat up as high as possible on all the burners for a few minutes to burn off any remaining fat/meat and then go over the grates with the wire brush and that seems to work pretty good. Then before I fire it up for the next use I usually go over it again with the brush (or with a scrap piece of aluminum foil if I have one handy) and then rub the grates with a paper towel with a bit of cooking oil on it.
 

Planit

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I usually try to clean it after each use. When I am done grilling and all the food has been removed I turn the heat up as high as possible on all the burners for a few minutes to burn off any remaining fat/meat and then go over the grates with the wire brush and that seems to work pretty good. Then before I fire it up for the next use I usually go over it again with the brush (or with a scrap piece of aluminum foil if I have one handy) and then rub the grates with a paper towel with a bit of cooking oil on it.
What he said.

It actually works very well and usually time it with the meat resting after it comes off the grill.
 

Maister

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I used the pizza oven box yesterday. Perhaps misused would be more accurate, because I managed to ruin two of the three pizzas I attempted. This was a clear case of operator error. I didn't read the instructions as thoroughly as I should have and only added 3/4's of a chimney full of charcoal, as opposed to a completely full chimney. Consequently, the stone never really got hot enough and only the first crust came out crisp; the following two crusts came out doughy and underdone.

I made a mistake. Lesson learned. I won't repeat it. I'll let you guys know how round two goes.

I get the feeling the pizza box oven may work better with gas grills, as they afford greater temperature control.
 
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