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The NEVERENDING Wine Thread

biscuit

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This one's for you RJ

This is the chance for Cyburban wine drinkers, aficionados and booze hounds alike, to discus wine. Tell us about your favorites, relay the news of a good wine find or just tell wine related stories. This is our new place in the urban web for all things relating to the fruit of the vine. That is, if the mods think it’s appropriate.

AIB:
Richmond Jake said:
This trend, too, will pass, IMHO. Cabernet and chardonnay only for this planner (but I never rule out a spicy sauvignon blanc).
And all of you stay safe, but keep us posted (so that we may post pad )
To tell you the truth it's a cabernet-siraz blend.Traditionally we have consumed merlots, but we’ve found this to be a good bit smoother without tasting too grapey and sweet. As far as chardonnays are concerned, they're usually either a little too sweet or buttery for my taste. That’s why I usually prefer a pinot when it comes to the whites.

Now, I’m no wine expert by any means. I just drink what I think taste good. That’s why the cab-shiraz in question is made by Yellowtail. I realize that they are probably the Budweiser of Australian wines but they have been consistently adequate to good and for usually less than $10 a bottle, they can’t be beat. I wonder what kind of rep they have n their native land? REM or any other Aussie care to comment?
 
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donk

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I was a huge hit when I took this wine for dinner.

Who'd a thunk that there would be a market for kosher wine in Newfoundland?

http://www.rodrigueswinery.com


I like the taste of wine, but have not yet developed enough of a palette to be able to effectively order it or explain it. I just know I like drier whites. Most embarrassing experience ever was on a date and I was given the wine list and my brain froze (5 minutes) until I was asked if I'd prefer a beer.
 

Richmond Jake

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biscuit said:
This one's for you RJ....I just drink what I think taste good.
You hit the nail on the head, biscuit ...drink what you like. As your taste's mature (poor term, sorry), so will your selection of types. In fact, I've had Greg Norman's cab-shiraz and thought it was a wonderful wine in its price category. I could go on with my favorites, but it would bore you all to tears (as I sit here suckign on a Michelob as the bbq warms up). For instance, tonignt I'll be drinking a Liberty School, 2001, cabernat second label from another major winery (paid about $12 for it here in Florida). I've liked the winery for a long time and I trust their product.

Again, drink what you like and don't fall into trends and snob appeal.
 

el Guapo

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This box of wine pictured above is my friend and special helper. And I never touch a drop...wink wink nudge nudge...know what I mean...know what I mean... ;)
 

Zoning Goddess

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I'm not too discerning, just like a dry white or red. But I do not get the "zinfandel" thing; arf. My sister-in-law won't drink anything else. Sometimes in a restaurant I'll ask for the "house white" and they bring that dang zinfandel. It's usually very raw tasting. Well, other than that, I don't have a clue about wines.
 

tsc

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Ah...fall is approaching...and time to start back with red wine....I love a good bottle of wine....

favorite standard:

Rosemont Diamond Label Shiraz

other good ones of late
Rosemont Grenache Shiraz or Merlot
Pepperwood Merlot
Galo Sanoma Reserve Cabernet
Sonoma Valley "Lodi" Cabernet.... same name as my crazy foster dog
Frank Copola Red Zinfandel
:-D
 

el Guapo

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Zoning Goddess said:
I'm not too discerning, just like a dry white or red. But I do not get the "zinfandel" thing; arf. My sister-in-law won't drink anything else. Sometimes in a restaurant I'll ask for the "house white" and they bring that dang zinfandel. It's usually very raw tasting. Well, other than that, I don't have a clue about wines.
Zinfändel is the German colloquial for cat piss in a glass. :)
 

H

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the southern cone

I am a big fan of the Chilean and Argentine wines. They are on the less expense side, but can be very high in quality and taste.

Concho y Toro: Casillero del Diablo is a good one.

The Gato wines are not so high in quality, but even lower in price, so over all not a bad buy.


From the other side, the Mendoza Valley produces quality ‘vino’, also for cheap.


What do you know about the Chilean wines, SkeL? I might be a silly gringo, but cheap prices, and good quality so I am sold :)
 

biscuit

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el Guapo said:
Zinfändel is the German colloquial for cat piss in a glass. :)
Zing... Good one!
In my book white zinfandel equals blech. Can’t stand it… Way too sweet for me. Not that there aren’t any good white zins out there, but it’s just not for me. On the same note, I also don’t like ports and other dessert wins.
 

Repo Man

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I really like this new wine I found. Relatively inexpensive and a wide variety of flavors are available. My favorite is Banana Red. I think its called MD 20/20. :-#

I don't like many white wines. I have had some Chardonnays that are ok and I like Muscato in the summer, but I tend to gravitate towards reds. I really like Merlot, Cabrnet, Shiraz, and Zinfindels, like Renwood (real robust red zin, not white cat piss zin). 7 deadly Zins is also great. When I want inexpensive yet good wine I buy Yellow Tail. A lot of times I will just look at the ratings and reviews that the wine shop pastes next to the bottle.

Two Buck Chuck is also decent wine when you just want some regular old wine with dinner.

I love Port wine too. My favorite is Clocktower, which is good because it is inexpensive when compared with some of the other ports.
 

Richmond Jake

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el Guapo said:
Zinfändel is the German colloquial for cat piss in a glass. :)
so very wrong....I suggest you try a Sausal or Rosemblum zin....I should have included them on my list...i'm off to bed
 

BKM

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Hardly an expert, but here are some I've enjoyed over the years living out here in Northern California

Rochiolli (sp?)-a small, cult winery in the Russian River/Dry Creek area of Sonoma County produces an incredible Pinot Noir that is strong, peppery, and probably my favorite.

Atlas Peak-Sangiovese-very nice.

My newest favorite, although its too expensive to be anything but a special occasion wine: Clayton (Lodi) Old Vine Petite Syrah 1999. Amazing stuff. Absolutely inky in color, and THICK in flavor and character.

Just tonight, I enjoyed a new one at a big dinner we had: Niebaum-Coppola Claret (a cab mix): awesome, rich flavor. Too bad the meal was just "meh"
 

donk

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On port, I like it, but never have the occasion to drink it. When i've been out for dinner it seems pretentious to order it.


As with all things alcoholic, I have a funny story about port. I was at the World Cup Mountain Bike Race in Quebec, I was at a VIP function sponsored by the Liquor Commission. There were bottles of port being served, somehow my table got a few and started drinking it out of bordeaux glasses. I probably drank a bottle and a half my elf. I go up to get another bottle and to find out what we are drinking, the sever drops the bomb that the stuff we were drinking like swill were actually a $80-$125 bottles of port. Fortunately it was an open bar. We had killed 5 or 6 bottles at our table. We were soon cut off.
 

Richmond Jake

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BKM said:
...Rochiolli (sp?)-a small, cult winery in the Russian River/Dry Creek area of Sonoma County produces an incredible Pinot Noir that is strong, peppery, and probably my favorite.....
Yes, good call. And their neighbor, Hop Kiln is also worthy of attention. Additionally, Dry Creek Vineyards makes some of my favorites.
 

michaelskis

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If you get a chance, try Tabor Hill. It is from Benton Harbor Michigan, and it was served at the White House during the Bush Sr. administration.
 

SkeLeton

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H said:
I am a big fan of the Chilean and Argentine wines. They are on the less expense side, but can be very high in quality and taste.

Concho y Toro: Casillero del Diablo is a good one.

The Gato wines are not so high in quality, but even lower in price, so over all not a bad buy.


From the other side, the Mendoza Valley produces quality ‘vino’, also for cheap.


What do you know about the Chilean wines, SkeL? I might be a silly gringo, but cheap prices, and good quality so I am sold :)
God forbid! sh*t I didn't even know we exported that junk labeled as "Gato" yuck!
I don't know about all the vinyards that export but if you want a good one (but not cheap) I'd say you try to get a Montes Alpha. And if you want decent and cheap go for Ventisquero, now I don't know if those get to your regular wine shop But those are the ones I know.
 

Richmond Jake

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michaelskis said:
If you get a chance, try Tabor Hill. It is from Benton Harbor Michigan, and it was served at the White House during the Bush Sr. administration.
Oh pleeeease. Leave the serious wine making to the left coast and what ever you make in Michigan to, well, Michigan. ;-) (difficult to type with a glass of Kendall Jackson chardonnay in your hand)
 

BKM

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RichmondJake said:
Yes, good call. And their neighbor, Hop Kiln is also worthy of attention. Additionally, Dry Creek Vineyards makes some of my favorites.
Too bad I've only seen it on one restaurant menu (a place that's closed-Square One near McArthur Park)

Its great cycling country. Maybe I need to make a trip up there this fall and combine three great things (cycling, Rochiolli, and a great French bakery in Healdsburgh :))
 

H

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SkeLeton said:
God forbid! sh*t I didn't even know we exported that junk labeled as "Gato" yuck!
I don't know about all the vinyards that export but if you want a good one (but not cheap) I'd say you try to get a Montes Alpha. And if you want decent and cheap go for Ventisquero, now I don't know if those get to your regular wine shop But those are the ones I know.

Yeah, I knew Gato was low on quality, but didnt think it was thought of as that low. I mainly buy it becasue it is cheap. real cheap. and honestly, I like it. :-$

it was even a chilean lady who introduced me to it. It was was she drank. :p

I will try the others you mention. what is your opinion of the Concho y Toro?
 

Richmond Jake

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I'm inspired, so it's off to Publix on a mission to search, replace, and destroy before football starts. Who's with me? :cool:
 

Dan

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I'm wondering why, at least in the US, regional wines don't get as much attention as those from California's Napa Valley.There are some excellent wines that originate in Northeast Ohio, the Finger Lakes region, and the Niagara region in Ontario. I know the thought of a fine Ohio wine might resonate the same as Soviet cigarettes, but still, it's damn hard to find regionals from other parts of the country.

You can find Bully Hill at the Liquor Supermarket in Boulder, though.

A little known story: the label for Love Goat changes every year. If you save ten years of labels, and flip them like a paper movie book, you'll find that the goat's tongue flaps back and forth.
 

Richmond Jake

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Dan said:
I'm wondering why, at least in the US, regional wines don't get as much attention as those from California's Napa Valley........
Because they suck? +o(
 

Richmond Jake

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el Guapo said:


This box of wine pictured above is my friend and special helper. And I never touch a drop...wink wink nudge nudge...know what I mean...know what I mean... ;)
I wouldn't use it to flush the toilet during a power outage.
 

el Guapo

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RichmondJake said:
I wouldn't use it to flush the toilet during a power outage.

RJ Is this from your winesnob website?

Well goody for you.

BTW - When the electric power goes down out here in the sticks my toilet seems to continue operating. But, I must not have an electric one like you. ;)
 

nerudite

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I like reds, but they don't like me. Although I love the taste of red wine, I can't have more than a glass or two without headaches, etc. Montepulciano is my favourite.

This weekend BME and I rented a cabin and got out of the house for a whole weekend (the first time since July that we haven't worked on the house for a weekend). We both drank a lot... but I downed a bottle of Banrock Station Shiraz and got drunk (and sick). No more red wine for me for awhile. :-#

BTW... The Banrock Station was given to me by my boss for xmas last year... part of the sales proceeds go to saving wetlands in Australia or something. You can get toasted and help save the environment at the same time. ;)
 

SkeLeton

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H said:
Yeah, I knew Gato was low on quality, but didnt think it was thought of as that low. I mainly buy it becasue it is cheap. real cheap. and honestly, I like it. :-$

it was even a chilean lady who introduced me to it. It was was she drank. :p

I will try the others you mention. what is your opinion of the Concho y Toro?
Well, Gato is cheap and poor quality, now sure it's not piss poor quality but close...:p

Concha y Toro is quite decent and i'd guess fair priced.
I also remembered two more vinyards that are decent and somewhat cheap... Errazuriz and Tarapaca. :)
On the red wines around here we also have great Carmeneres that were hidden here after they disappeared in Europe and we sold it as Merlot :p
 

Dan

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RichmondJake said:
I wouldn't use it to flush the toilet during a power outage.
IMHO, If you're just looking to drink a glass a day for health benefits, there's nothing wrong with box wine. You can now get higher quality wines in a box, and it keeps better than a recorked bottle of the good stuff.

Now, the thought of a romantic date at home, where you're sitting in front of the fireplace, and tearing open a box of Franzia pink Zin, isn't too appealing. Each wine has its time and place.
 

The One

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Just Don't Buy

Sauternes wine is terrible :-# Nasty nasty nasty.....kind of what I imagine a hardcore diabetic's urine would taste like, shortly after eating an extra large blizzard, whole pecan pie, and drinking 2 litres of coke..... +o(
And to think that Château d'Yquem is widely considered to be one of the oldest and greatest few acres on earth for production of this wine.....$500 for a half litre bottle in a restaurant ($300 in the store).

However, port is great (20 year Martinez)
 

tsc

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Dan said:
You can find Bully Hill at the Liquor Supermarket in Boulder, though.

A little known story: the label changes every year. If you save ten years of labels, and flip them like a paper movie book, you'll find that the goat's tongue flaps backa nd forth.
I have a signed bottle from Walter Taylor.... of love my goat...(before his car accident)

My parents are big supporters (drinkers) of finger lakes wines. I am not so found of them...so I usually tote my own wine to Ithaca. Ironically....once I open the bottle...my mom usually prefers it...and drinks mine instead. :-o
 

SkeLeton

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Vineyards and sprawl.... A problem I bet is in lots of places. (H asked about this in a PM but I thought it would be selfish not to share)

Well, around here, Santiago's suburbs are pushing the local vineyards out; small rural/rurban towns like Pirque are about to get conurbated with the rest of the "blob". Pirque is the birthplace of some vineyards like Concha y Toro and a few small ones. Right now, while it's still not that urban, mainly because of the natural barrier formed by the Maipo River, there is frequent and sustained sprawl of suburban settlements that collides with the rural people that are practically seeing their doom with the arrival of yuppies that want to live in a semi-rural enviroment "out" of Santiago.

Now, this is happening mainly in the Santiago area, vineyards located outside of Santiago are still likely to prosper, and many won't encounter with sprawl in decades, others, like the vineyards in the Elqui, and Limari valleys are still extremely rural, so no sprawl can come and eat away the vineyards (th, sadly, in those lower latitudes, rainfall and water availability is the biggest problems of all, so in casse of a severe and permanent drought, say good bye to those vineyards, and to most of our Pisco production :(.
More to the south, around the Maule valley the cities are still small and their rate of growth isn't too big due to the main activity of the region is agriculture.
So when looking for good Chilean wines that have plenty of future look for vineyards that are south of Santiago, such as the Santa Cruz valley or Maule valley.
 

Cardinal

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This has the potential to be a great thread.

I love wines. My favorites are the reds. Lately I have been drinking many of the Shiraz's from Australia. It is similar to a Zinfandel; a spicy wine with peppery aftertastes that goes very well with red meats.

California wines are really much better than the over-rated French wines. The big-name wine-makers (Mondavi, Copolla, etc.) are good, but I tend to like the smaller producers much better. Duck Horn makes some outstanding reds (Merlot, Cabernet, and blends) and Frank makes outstanding whites. I don't generally like Chardonney, but theirs is incredible. Desert wines are another interesting area. St. Supery makes a very nice Muscato, and Grgich's Violetta is perhaps the best in the USA.

I have to mention Germany. German Reislings are far superior to any others. I look for ones from the Mosel-Saar-Ruhr region. They tend to be drier, crisp and very well balanced, with hints of apple or pear, as opposed to the bigger fruitiness common in US or other Reislings.
 

Rem

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biscuit said:
This one's for you RJ .....Now, I’m no wine expert by any means. I just drink what I think taste good. That’s why the cab-shiraz in question is made by Yellowtail. I realize that they are probably the Budweiser of Australian wines but they have been consistently adequate to good and for usually less than $10 a bottle, they can’t be beat. I wonder what kind of rep they have n their native land? REM or any other Aussie care to comment?
Sorry I missed your question [/b]biscuit[/b] - I wasn't ignoring you, just being busy at work. I do know a lot of Australian wines (purely out of academic interest) but have never heard of Yellowtail. I suspect it is a wine that is sold under a different name in Australia. It is common for varietal wines especially to be given a more market friendly name when exported. If you can tell me the maker and/or the region it comes from and/or the variety I might be able to offer an opinion.

I am fortunate to live in the Hunter Valley - a premium Australian wine district, though I am about 45 minutes drive to the vineyards. If any Cyburbian ever manages to visit, I assure you a few days can be lost in the vineyards in my backyard.

My favorite Australian wines are reds from the terra rossa soil of the Barossa Valley South Australia, resilings from Clare Valley SA, Hunter and Western Australia Semillons. If you see any Annies Lane Reisling, Jamiesons Run or Wynns Reds, anything from Brokenwood but especially Semillon. Anything from Sandalford. Actually there are hundreds of great wines in Australia. Lots of cheap good varietals from the Riverina, and Victoria. Just come and try some.
 

zman

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Wine for dinner tonight.

So the girlfriend and I decided to have a nice dinner tonight. She only likes white wine (Chards, mostly) and I don;t care what I drink, but I have been exposed to some good wines and I can kind of tell the difference.

What would be a good white wine to go with Italian food. (Non red sauce/red meat of course)? Something priced reasonable please.
 

Greenescapist

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I bought a few wines from British Columbia when I was home on the east coast this Christmas. My family's favorite was the Mission Hill Pinot Blanc. It's terrific with fish, it has a nice dry, citrus taste. Unfortunately, I can't find it in Wisconsin.

I lived in Spain for a semester in college and still like to get Marques de Caceres Rioja. It's a nice basic red.

I also like Shiraz, Syrah, Cabernets and Pinot Noirs. I'm kind of tired of Chardonnay and Merlot, but am not too picky if someone brings them over.
 

Dan

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"No, if anyone orders Merlot, I'm leaving. I AM NOT DRINKING ANY FCSKING MERLOT!"
 

biscuit

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zmanPLAN said:
Wine for dinner tonight.

So the girlfriend and I decided to have a nice dinner tonight. She only likes white wine (Chards, mostly) and I don;t care what I drink, but I have been exposed to some good wines and I can kind of tell the difference.

What would be a good white wine to go with Italian food. (Non red sauce/red meat of course)? Something priced reasonable please.
I don't know about labels but I've always like Pinot Grigios more than chardonnay.
 

Bear Up North

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This Bear is not a wine drinker. Give me a :b: .

I have probably had ten (10) glasses at most in the last twenty-five (25) years. Just being polite. Am I missing something?

I did go through a wine-drinking phase, just out of high school. We used to pile in the car and cruise over to east Toledo.....because ".....all the girls xxxxed....". We would buy a bunch of cheapo wine, like Meier's Lake Erie Pink Catawba, and head over the bridge to the east side. No wine glasses in our car.....paper cups or straight out of the bottle.

We were sooooooooooooooo cool.

Bear On Woodville Road
 

zman

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biscuit said:
I don't know about labels but I've always like Pinot Grigios more than chardonnay.
Thanks, our dinner plans had changed, but I will try that tonight. Once again thanks for answering my question
 

Richmond Jake

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I just opened a Kenwood 2001 Sauvignon Blanc. Picked it up at Publix on the way home for about $12. I would recommend this with Italian.
 

Cardinal

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By Italian, what do you mean? If you are serving a tomato sauce, a red would be more appropriate, but you could get by with a chardonney. A white sauce or olive oil based dish gives you more options. Your best bet would be to go to the Italian section of your wine shop and select a simple white table wine.
 

zman

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Cardinal said:
By Italian, what do you mean? If you are serving a tomato sauce, a red would be more appropriate, but you could get by with a chardonney. A white sauce or olive oil based dish gives you more options. Your best bet would be to go to the Italian section of your wine shop and select a simple white table wine.
Thanks for the help guys, we decided to bag the Italian tonight and just get a roasted chicken and salad from the store.

I think a nice box of wine shall do, or a jug of blush.... :-$

Just kidding...
 

BKM

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The local "upscale" grocery has an excellent (read yuppie $$$) wine section with a knowledgeable department manager. Since Nugget Market opened in Vacaville, I've spent far more than I ever did before on wine.

They have in-store tastings for $3.00 Not a bad deal, since they usually have awsome cheese and bread to go along with it. I actually liked a cab thursday night enough that I bought two bottles-and the winemaker signed them for me!
 

zman

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Cooked some angel hair pasta with pesto, and beggies last night.

Capped off with a Cavit Pinto Gris. Very good, and my girlfriend liked it with dinner too.

Beginning to see the way certain wines go with certain foods... :-D
 

JNL

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I'll put in a plug for New Zealand whites, which sell quite well internationally. Particularly sauvignon blanc. We're starting to produce some great reds too, but currently our whites are better known. Why not impress your dinner partner with something a little exotic from down under ;-) (that sounds a little dodgy but it wasn't intended to!).

If anyone ever makes it down here, I'd be more than happy to accompany you on a wine trail (or two) - there are 3 major wine producing areas within a few hours drive. The closest is only an hour and a half away and you can do a package tour including return train fare and guided tour of 6 or so vineyards :)
 

zman

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JNL said:
Why not impress your dinner partner with something a little exotic from down under ;-) (that sounds a little dodgy but it wasn't intended to!).
:)
I'm going to be laughing about that one for a while...
 

donk

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Another forum I read had this link for all of you wine experts out there, and especially Rumpy ;)

I am pretty sure it is work safe.
 
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