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The New Order

The new right?

  • Its the end of the world as we know it.

    Votes: 5 23.8%
  • I will survive these next two years

    Votes: 9 42.9%
  • We was robbed.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Its a good thing.

    Votes: 7 33.3%

  • Total voters
    21

gkmo62u

Cyburbian
Messages
1,046
Points
24
Eric

I am busy here clear cutting and paving...

Its difficult to join some of these discussions, particularly the political ones, when my side is always right.

NHP--your point is taken, but the question wasn't posed to you.

I think I'll take the easy way out on this one:

Look at the score board.
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
NHPlanner said:
Frankly, no. It doesn't.

That makes me sad.

:(

"In other men we faults can spy,
And blame the mote that dims their eye;
Each little speck and blemish find;
To our own equal errors blind."
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
10,139
Points
45
gkmo62u said:
Eric

I am busy here clear cutting and paving...

Its difficult to join some of these discussions, particularly the political ones, when my side is always right.

NHP--your point is taken, but the question wasn't posed to you.

I think I'll take the easy way out on this one:

Look at the score board.

And I cannot argue with you there. As I pointed out long ago in this thread, I'm used to being outvoted here in NH. But without the minority like me, what kind of political system would we have?
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
NHPlanner said:
And I cannot argue with you there. As I pointed out long ago in this thread, I'm used to being outvoted here in NH. But without the minority like me, what kind of political system would we have?

As I've alluded to before - you and I are in the same boat, at least at the state level, NHP. There's being in the minority, and then there's being in the minority, know what I mean?

Have no fear, though. Many Massachusetts Democrats are moving to Southern NH for that fine, affordable housing and income tax-free livin'! (Though I'm not sure at the end of the day that'll make you too happy...???)
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
For the Record

I voted for the following:
U.S. SENATOR
JEAN CARNAHAN (DEM)
JIM TALENT (REP)
TAMARA A. MILLAY (LIB)
DANIEL (digger) ROMANO (GRN)

STATE AUDITOR
CLAIRE McCASKILL (DEM)
AL HANSON (REP)
ARNOLD J. TREMBLEY (LIB)
FRED KENNELL (GRN)

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE DIST 6
SAM GRAVES (REP)
CATHY RINEHART (DEM)
ERIK BUCK (LIB)

STATE SENATOR DIST 34
CHARLIE SHIELDS (REP)
GLENDA KELLY (DEM)
ERIC (JP) PENDELL (IND).

STATE REPRESENTATIVE DIST 28
ROB SCHAAF (REP)
LANCE DAVIS (DEM).

PRESIDING COMMISSIONER
TOM MANN (DEM)
BRIAN R. HOPKINS (REP)

PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
DWIGHT K. SCROGGINS,JR (DEM)

PROPOSITION A (A tax upon cigarettes)
NO
YES

CITY OF ST. JOSEPH PROPOSITION (A CIP TAX)
YES
NO

Let's see that is
3 Republicans
2 Libertarians
2 Democrats
1 Greenie
and for 2 taxes
Hardly a monolithic voting pattern.
All candidates and issues were researched and the lesser of the many evils was choosen.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
10,139
Points
45
You vote like I do Guap....lesser evils.

I've only voted a straight ticket one time in my life (my first time voting), and probably never will again.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
10,139
Points
45
El Feo said:
Many Massachusetts Democrats are moving to Southern NH for that fine, affordable housing and income tax-free livin'! (Though I'm not sure at the end of the day that'll make you too happy...???)

Affordable housing!

Thanks El Feo...THAT is my laugh of the day!

BTW...it seems like once they hit the border they all transform into conservatives. Southern NH is the Republican stronghold in the towns. The only places Dems make a dent (and a small one at that) in NH is in the cities (all 4 or so of them).
 
Messages
3,680
Points
27
I was talking to my mother this morning and her voting strategy reminded me of the episode of Will and Grace, where Will was supporting a Gay Candidate and Grace a Jewish Woman candidate, just because of their "minority affilliation", but then Will's guy turned out to be a white supremacist and Grace's turned out to be something equally awful, so they jumped ship and decided to support "The Black Guy". I'm not proud of this, but Here's my mom's strategy (When she's undecided between candidates) :
1. Vote for whatever woman is running, regardless of party affiliation
2. Unless she's on the Right to Life ballot
3. Vote for any black candidate
4. Then it is straight across Dem lines
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
NHPlanner said:


Affordable housing!

Thanks El Feo...THAT is my laugh of the day!


Sadly, NHP, all is relative. If I was still in KY, I'd swallow my tongue and my head would explode over southern NH home prices - but since I live inside 495...!
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,069
Points
34
Re: For the Record

El Guapo said:
I voted for the following...

Let's see that is
3 Republicans
2 Libertarians
2 Democrats
1 Greenie
and for 2 taxes
...and the lesser of the many evils was choosen.

Damn, Guap! Hardly a brown shirt in the bunch (picking up on your theme). What's next, free-range pigs and organic coffee?
 
Last edited:

Wannaplan?

Ready to Learn
Messages
3,237
Points
30
SW MI Planner said:


Beaner - do you think thats why Jennifer asks like such a stinken &@#$% - to try to *prove* otherwise? I didn't even want to vote for her.

((sorry if you like her - she just rubbed me the wrong way))

That's one of the reasons why I didn't vote. Certainly Granholm is an improvement over the 1998 Democratic candidate, Geoffery Fieger (ugh), but she, like most politicians, spews rhetoric and sounds like a used-car saleman (or saleswoman). I read her platform stances back in August for the primary, and she didn't sound too different from anyone else. She was, and is, boring. However, I do wish her the best of luck. She is qualified, has an impressive background, and after 12 years of Engler, things might just be fresh for once. But I'm not gonna say that she is going to get Michigan back on track. Yet.
 

Wannaplan?

Ready to Learn
Messages
3,237
Points
30
Re: Re: Re: Sorry.

El Guapo said:


Sorry, I just thought you were rationalizing being to lazy too vote. Oh, wait, I'm not sorry.

No, I'm never too lazy to vote. I always loved to vote, and never missed a non-primary election.

Until now.

I am going through a political identity crisis that began in early 1999 when President Clinton's taped grand jury testimony was televised. My jaw went agape when he said, "That depends on what the definition of 'is' is." Wow. Balls. Total balls. Then, of course, in 2000, when technical glitches at the Florida voting booths sidelined the Presidential ballot counting process, things inside me began to solidify.

Politics in America is not what I thought it was. To think the individual or individuals I vote for will represent my interests seems a bit naive. Simply punching holes in a card at the ballot booth isn't enough. Getting what you want out of a candidate involves donations and plenty of volunteer time. Plus, there's all that too predictable and condescending rhetoric:

"Be a part of the Democratic Family so we can put an end to the senseless and out of control Republicans!"

"We must form a bipartisan coalition to create real change for American families."

...etcetera, etcetera, ad infinitum...

Okay, I get it already.

Of course we want a better America. Of course we want to be prosperous. Yes, we want to stop gridlock. Yes we want strong, experienced leaders. You're not saying anything I haven't ever heard before, ya know?

I want to vote. I really do.

But until I hear a candidate who doesn't treat my interests and vote as a commodity, I will continue my self-reflection on the American political system. When I reach the point of understanding and acceptance, I will once again return to the voting booths. Hopefully it will be sooner rather than later. However, I do not think that will be the case.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,986
Points
31
However much it pains me, I must agree with you; we just seem to choose the more likable whore when we vote. I have yet to meet the pure vison candidate. I hope you find your candidate(s) - Really.
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,065
Points
32
I was involved in Nixon's first winning campaign...very involved. Working so hard for what I thought was the right cause, then finding out all the facts about the jerk; well, it took me several years to ever vote again. Later I got into community development as a career, and found Reagan's first HUD Secretary "selling" grants. I won't mention the US Representative who ended up with my date (all night) at a college republican convention. And I won't mention a current republican US Senator who couldn't keep his hands off my mother's neighbor.

My point is that neither major party can claim a "higher moral standard".
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,370
Points
29
Ya know Beaner you expressed what my boyfriend tried to tell me Tuesday night when I was HORRIFIED he did not vote.

Mind you he's a VERY well educated lawyer from a family as old as this nation.

He's very well versed in the issues both nationally, internationally and locally. He's a conservative democrat I would think *socially liberal, fiscally conservative* like me (pick your jaw up Guap). I simply could not understand why such a man *the very type the framers wanted to have vote* would NOT vote.

now I get it-thank you

D
 

statler

Cyburbian
Messages
447
Points
14
So, does anybody have any ideas on how to fix the system? I'm not too into politics, so I can't offer too many idea on how to fix a system that I really don't know how it was supposed to work in the first place. Where are all the "good" canidates? Why don't they run? Why can't they raise enough funds to run a winning campain? And the few good ones that do get in, why can't tey seem to fix things once they get there? Does anybody have any guesses, because I don't have a clue.
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,370
Points
29
Well i was a poli sci major-we talked about this for hours and hours-the long and short was the good guys dont want to run becouse they:
1)want their privacy-digging in someones past life gets a bit too much i think
2) they can make more money OUTside politics *do ya blame them?*
3) hum lets see death threats
4) no sleep and no time with family

that right there is enough to make decide i dont ever want to go into politics-i am who i am and proud of it, not willing to fit some public idea of what i should be-thus no politics
 
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