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Nostalgia 🕰 The quintessential 1970's

Maister

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Oh no, I lost my John Denver 8-track tape. I've looked all over the house and can't find it anywhere!

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So what were the quintessential cars, books, movies, decor, hairstyles, clothing, and music trends of that decade?
 
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Whose Yur Planner

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The Love Boat
Fantasy Island
Starsky and Hutch
Dukes of Hazard
Bozo the Clown on WGN
Free range kids
Scooby Doo
Overt drug references in kids shows.
There was a kids show on PBS that was pretty good as I remember. Can't remember the name of it though.
 

luckless pedestrian

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I was going into 1st grade in 1970 so the 70's were definitely my childhood years so yeah on that station wagon and the banana bike

and I appeared on Bozo in Syracuse in 1971? lol

Pink Panther Show, Schoolhouse Rock, Harlem Globetrotters, Hot Wheels, Jackson Five, Brady Bunch, Josie & the Pussycats, Scooby Doo, Dudley Do Right, Fantastic Four

Logan's Run, Close Encounters, The Jerk, Clint movies, Mel Brooks movies, Star Wars, The Sting, The Amityville Horror, Taxi Driver, Godfathers, bad stuff happening movies like Poseidon Adventure & Towering Inferno

6 million dollar man, Mary Tyler Moore, Maude, happy days, fantasy island, Mannix, Adam 12, Flip Wilson, wonderful world of Disney, wild kingdom, mash, kojak, Jefferson's Charlie angels, one day at at a time, mork & Mindy, Christmas specials

Stevie Wonder, Carpenters, Alice Cooper, Helen reddy, the Dead, Eagles, Steely Dan, Disco, Fleetwood Mac, James Taylor, Carly Simon,

playing levitation games, riding bikes to friends' houses, Barbie's, tube socks, Tiger Beat Magazine, comic books, sweatbands (tennis was big) flavored lip gloss, love's baby soft everything, orange shag carpeting, dancing the hustle at slumber parties, mood rings, levi jeans with the red tag, velour shirts,
 

Hawkeye66

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My first car I started to drive in 1987 at age 16 was the family 1978 Ford LTD, similar to what you see here. This appears to be a year or two earlier? We did not have the fake wood paneling, what a lighter green exterior, and a dark green interior. Had 12 people in it one night. My parents traded in the 1975? LTD on the 1978.

That is a 1974 Country Squire LTD. By the Mid 80's it was a full on battering ram. I wanted chandeliers like the Duke of New York's car.
 

Maister

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I used to work with someone who got out of Nam like that. Her dad was SVA and an advisor to the Americans. She was one of the lucky ones but let me tell you... a Houston accent superimposed over a Vietnamese accent is.... different.
Ah yes, Operation Eagle Pull
 

JNA

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The 70's were a real mixed bag of experiences & emotions for me.

Bad - my father died, no prom date, laid off from even a some job
Normal for most - HS graduation, started college, 18 & 21 birthdays, changed college major, getting driver's license
Good - Eagle Court of Honor, Summer Camp job, drove cross country, college spring break - skiing at Sun Valley
 
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Hawkeye66

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I was a 70's latchkey kid. Children of the first wave of mass US Divorce. I was living semi independently by age 10. I got myself to and from school, cooked for myself after school and for my brother too.

We would come home, watch Hogan's Heros and Star Trek or the Wild, Wild West. Slim Whitman commercials too. Good times.
 

Whose Yur Planner

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I was a 70's latchkey kid. Children of the first wave of mass US Divorce. I was living semi independently by age 10. I got myself to and from school, cooked for myself after school and for my brother too.

We would come home, watch Hogan's Heros and Star Trek or the Wild, Wild West. Slim Whitman commercials too. Good times.
I started out as a latchkey kid but then my mom got hurt. Not to dog my mother's parenting skills, but I didn't notice much difference. It's probably one of the reasons I'm so independent.
 

Maister

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What was the quintessential CITY of the 1970's? What US city most embodied the zeitgeist of the prevailing economic and social conditions of the time, or perhaps even planning trends?
 

Maister

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New York City. It had that gritty vibe before everything changed in the 80's.
I was trying to think of a rust belt city, but really that would be more of a quintessential 1980's phenomenon. So I gotta say, I think you're right. Times Square probably epitomizes the urban decay, decadence (sex shops, high crime, seedy cinemas, etc.) and decline we associate with that decade, and coincides almost perfectly with the arc of urban renewal that followed.

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Whose Yur Planner

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I was trying to think of a rust belt city, but really that would be more of a quintessential 1980's phenomenon. So I gotta say, I think you're right. Times Square probably epitomizes the urban decay, decadence (sex shops, high crime, seedy cinemas, etc.) and decline we associate with that decade, and coincides almost perfectly with the arc of urban renewal that followed.

View attachment 51751
I think for us who lived in fly over county, our exposure to NYC was the nightly news and the TV show Barney Miller. Natalie Merchant's video for the song Carnival was another glimpse into that world.
 

Gedunker

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I lived in metro NY through the 70s and into the 80s. If media was your glimpse into that world, you don't have a clue how far the Big Apple had fallen. Try driving the Cross Bronx Expressway (CBE for locals) some summer afternoon in say, 1980. Oh. My. God.
 

JNA

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I lived in metro NY through the 70s and into the 80s. If media was your glimpse into that world, you don't have a clue how far the Big Apple had fallen. Try driving the Cross Bronx Expressway (CBE for locals) some summer afternoon in say, 1980. Oh. My. God.
Equal to that the difference between today & then - The Garden State Parkway both in traffic & the widening.
 

Dan

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What was the quintessential CITY of the 1970's? What US city most embodied the zeitgeist of the prevailing economic and social conditions of the time, or perhaps even planning trends?
I think Aurora, Colorado is the quintessential 1970s American suburb. Its planing policies, and their implementation, resulted in what would have been considered a near-perfect urban form by 1970s standards. For example:
I've said this before: if a then-contemporary best practice is described in an article in any 1970s-era Planning magazine, it'll be standard operating procedure in Aurora, and many other Denver suburbs. Aurora gets a bad rap from the Denver area hipster and armchair planner crowd, in part because it seems too planned and manicured.

Not only that, but the Denver area was booming in the 1970s. Denver was the original designated host for the 1976 Winter Olympics. Denver has a vibrant downtown even today, but its skyline really hasn't changed much since the 1970s. I'd say Denver was the American city that best reflected the zeitgeist of the 1970s, with Dallas running a close 2nd, and maybe Houston 3rd. I'd also give Kansas City and San Diego brown, yellow, and orange-colored honorary mentions.

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Dan

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I was trying to think of a rust belt city, but really that would be more of a quintessential 1980's phenomenon.
F is for Family does a great job at portraying day-to-day life in the Rust Belt during the 1970s.


I recommend season 1, episode 3 -- "The Trough",
 

Maister

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WANT!


Sorry...this car must be in The Quintessential 1980's thread (movie debuted in 1983)
Yes, but even by the early 1980's they had already identified what was wrong with 1970's car design
 

JNA

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The AMC Pacer – a Disco Ball of Strange Proportions

Six mistakes that killed the AMC Pacer — and American Motors
 

Maister

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The AMC Pacer – a Disco Ball of Strange Proportions

Six mistakes that killed the AMC Pacer — and American Motors
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Whose Yur Planner

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The AMC Pacer – a Disco Ball of Strange Proportions

Six mistakes that killed the AMC Pacer — and American Motors
Hey, I had a Pacer in college. It wasn't half bad. It was uglier than three day old sin and wasn't exactly a chick magnet, but it handled well and had lots of room. This was probably one of the signs that I was going to a Planner.
 

Super Amputee Cat

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The AMC Pacer – a Disco Ball of Strange Proportions

Six mistakes that killed the AMC Pacer — and American Motors
Actually the AMC Pacer has become a very collectable car, depending on body type or year. The more recent models, 1979-1980 are now worth between $12,000 and $14,000 but older models like the 1975 Hatchback is only valued at $4,850.
 

Dan

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Hey, I had a Pacer in college. It wasn't half bad. It was uglier than three day old sin and wasn't exactly a chick magnet, but it handled well and had lots of room. This was probably one of the signs that I was going to a Planner.
We've talked about what planner cars are nowadays. (That's probably changed somewhat since Volvo 240s are slowly disappearing from the roads, and Saturn spottings are rare outside of those enclaves where they had a cult following.) Was AMC was a favorite brand among planners back in the cedar contemporary pod PUD days?

Other probable North American planner cars of the 1970s? My guesses include:
  • anything from Volvo and Saab, of course.
  • Peugeot 504.
  • Audi Fox and 5000. (Audi wasn't a luxury brand back then.)
  • Volkswagen Dasher.
  • International Harvester Scout, in the rural west.
  • an affordable British sports car, like something from MG or Triumph.
  • in a municipal fleet, a hand-me-down police Dodge Coronet, complete with an interior that you can hose down, and rear doors that only open from the outside.
 

JNA

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Clarence Williams III, ‘The Mod Squad’s’ Linc, dies at 81

The show ran from on ABC from 1968 through 1973. A trailblazing show for attempting to portray the hippie generation of the time, “The Mod Squad” was a star-maker for all three.
 
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