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The real estate listing photo thread (original content only!)

Dan

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As inspired by Ugly House Photos. Find photos on your own, though.

I'll start. Some say there's a little bit of truth behind most stereotypes.

cheektovegas.jpg
 

Doohickie

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What a cute little house. Complete with pink flamingos. Takes me back home.

Literally.
 

fringe

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...best use of flamingos I have ever seen.

This is my followup to the listing one. I managed to scare the buyer off with my unvarnished report.

P1010310.JPG
 
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kms

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Here’s a Lustron home for sale for $1.00 but you have to move it. There’s one in my town that I’d love to own.

 

mendelman

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Here’s a Lustron home for sale for $1.00 but you have to move it. There’s one in my town that I’d love to own.

Maybe you think you’d like to live in one but I hung out in one and I wouldn’t want one. The NW Chicago burb we used to live in (and I worked for) had about a dozen and we had friends that lived a slightly modified one and it was small and awkward. I’d rather just find a traditional early 20th cent bungalow.

Is that a house or an unfinished fitness center?
More like an abandoned set from Logan’s Run.
 
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WSU MUP Student

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Here’s a Lustron home for sale for $1.00 but you have to move it. There’s one in my town that I’d love to own.

If I could get the land for $1 as well, I'd be buying that immediately. My parents sold my grandma's place in Sarasota after she died a few years ago and they've been kicking themselves ever since. For $1, my dad is still very active and pretty handy and that would be a fun project and an awesome location.
 
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Veloise

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Nice-looking ranch house FS. Not renovated beyond recognition, okay pricing.

I looked at the floor plan again and again. How do you get your groceries into the kitchen?
You can drive up the shared driveway, park in the garage, and unload through the service door ... and through the master BR.

No wonder they're moving.
 

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ChairmanMeow

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The s.o. has been looking for a new place and I was helping him out. I saw so many pink bathrooms - some paint, some paint + tile. Idk what people are thinking. I'll see if I can make a collage.
 

Dan

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The s.o. has been looking for a new place and I was helping him out. I saw so many pink bathrooms - some paint, some paint + tile. Idk what people are thinking. I'll see if I can make a collage.
Lookng forward to it! In my little town, those pink bathrooms would be directly off the dining room or kitchen.

Meanwhile, here's some crunchy goodness you'll only find here.

crunchy_1.jpg

"Natural" setting on a dirt road? Check.

"Green" vehicle-dependent exurban location with a Walk Score that could be negative? Check.

Eight years old, but looks more like 120, thanks to intentional returning-her-to-Mother-Earth-style weathering? Check.

Still, $220K is a deal around here.

Fridge in a hallway. A local tradition since the invention of the icebox.

fridge_in_the_hall.jpg

For some reason, local real estate agents have a thing for garden photos. This is no exception. There's more photos of plants and weeds in this listing than images of the interior.

crunchy_2.jpg

crunchy_3.jpg

One thing most of the "green" houses have in common around here: entry doors that dump directly into the living room or kitchen. No vestibule, "airlock", foyer, or coat closet. Open the front door on a breezy January day, and the living room temperature can from 68 to 58. Really, the majority of houses around here lack a defined front entry area. (Our house is an exception.)

no_foyer.jpg

Yes, the living room is nearly empty, except for some plants, and bicycles hanging on the wall. The bike-on-the-wall-in-a-prominent-room thing isn't that unusual around here.

Another "green" house. Note the thick walls. No vestibule.

no_foyer_2.jpg

In shivering Buffalo, where local custom dictates that only movers and the Pope pass through the front door, vestibules, foyers, or hallways are commonplace at both the front and side. Houses lacking front entry "transition spaces" are likely to be old worker's cottages, post-WWII starter houses, and those based on stock plans intended for the southern US.

vestibule.jpg
 

Maister

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Someone's been renovating a neat little MSM down the street from me. It just hit the market.

Sporty.



Best part about the high windows is that they face north so you won't get blasted with Texas sun.



Nice enclosed patio.

Wow. Just wow! I LOVE that three season porch. Looks like the roof pitch is maybe a 3:1 which wouldn't fly so well up here with all the snow we get (roofs are one area where MCM houses just don't cut it), but otherwise, dayum that looks appealing to me!
 

Doohickie

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They had an open house Saturday and we went to look at it. It's very cool, kind of quirky and has lots of little nooks and crannies. For a relatively modern house it has a lot of character. Behind the garage the roof extends out to create a little covered alcove. You have to go out the back door there to get to what you call the three season porch. Note that is is fully enclosed in glass and has its own AC/heater unity so really it's a four season room.

I believe the front room (the one with the high windows in the second picture) was actually a covered courtyard when the house was built and the wall was added later to make a second living room. It's a step down from the rest of the house, and the fireplace on that side looks like it was added to the chimney. There's also an opening between the dining area and that front room that looks like it used to be a window.

The living room (with the entry door) is actually not very big. It's a very cozy room though. The lynchpin of the house is the dining area which is oversized. Although it has no windows, there is plenty of light from adjacent rooms. The small living room with the entry door, the second living room with the high windows, the kitchen and the bedrooms and hall bath all connect to the dining area.

The kitchen window opens into that covered alcove behind the garage so it doesn't bring in much light but provides ventilation if you want to open it. The glassed-in porch is outside of the master bedroom (which has its own bath). The master BR is off the back left corner of the dining room, behind the kitchen. The other two bedrooms are off a separate hall to the right so it's a split BR arrangement (which I prefer). The hall bath is in the hall by the other bedrooms.

One bedroom has a nice set of built-ins.


The other has a pocket door. You don't see those very often.

EDIT: In fact you don't see them at all when they're open ;)
 
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