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The thread of old charts, and graphs

Super Amputee Cat

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Charts, graphs, and tables of statistical data are all over the net, but is it comprehensive and reliable?

I thought it would be kind of fun to post some old graphs and charts from renowned publications, long before the internet came into existence or even after. They may from anywhere during the 20th Century. Stuff that may not even be available on the internet at all, at least in a easily retrievable and viewable form.

I'll start with a graph showing narcotic addiction since 1900. It is from the Reader Digest Almanac, 1966. Who knew that addiction was such a problem at the beginning of the last Century? I heard that cocaine was a real problem in the first decade of the 1900s because it technically hadn't been outlawed in many areas. In fact, you may know that Coca-Cola actually did once have cocaine in it. And I wonder what the cause of the spike in the late 1940s was, before a slow decline. Could it be that postwar prosperity brought a new round of addiction and if so, what was the narcotic of choice?

Anyway, it would be interesting to see what this chart looked like by the end of the 1960s. There was probably a big spike, but probably nowhere near the levels of the early 1900s.

Narcotics Addiction 1963 (1).jpg
 
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Super Amputee Cat

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Crime rates 1963, top 140 Cities (Metro Areas)


Source: Readers Digest Almanac 1966.

This table shows the crime rate per 100,000 people as well as it's ranking. No surprise to see Las Vegas at #1 and Chicago, Miami, and L.A. in the Top 10 but what are Lexington and Great Falls Montana doing there?

Top 10

1. Las Vegas
2. Los Angeles
3. Miami
4. Phoenix
5. Lexington
6. Chicago
7. Great Falls
8. Atlantic City
9. Denver
10. Corpus Christi

Bottom 10.

131. Lima
132. New London-Groton, CT
133. Cincinnati
134. Kenosha
135. Huntington-Ashland
136. Racine
137. Portland, ME
138. Grand Rapids
139. Milwaukee
140. Boise


Keep in mind that these are for the metropolitan area and the actual city crime rate may be higher, especially in the larger metro areas. Still, I don't see Great Falls or Lexington having that big a metro area outside the city in the early 1960s.
Crime Rate by City 1963 (1).jpgCrime Rate by City 1963 (2a).jpg
 
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Dan

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I'll just drop this old bomb here.

newsweek_coolingworld_temp_diagram.jpg

It's from the infamous article "The Cooling World" from the April 28, 1975 edition of Newsweek. Climate change deniers love to cite the article as "proof" that global warming doesn't exist. "Scientists in the 1970s thought there'd be a new ice age! Now they're predicting global warming! They can't make up their minds! Why should we trust them?"
 

Dan

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Meanwhile, in the United States, back in 1850. I'd like to see where the states rank for the percentage of the population that's "insane" and "idiotic".

1850 dead dumb blind idiotic.png

"I see you didn't support the National Banking, Tariff, and Chewing Tobacco Acts of 1841, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, and 1849. Surely you must be an idiot."

Crime rates 1963, top 140 Cities (Metro Areas)
Interesting that the Buffalo metropolitan area is quite a bit larger than:
  • Anaheim (Orange County)
  • Atlanta
  • Charlotte
  • Cincinnati
  • Columbus
  • Dallas
  • Denver
  • Fort Worth
  • Houston
  • Indianapolis
  • Jacksonville
  • Kansas City
  • Las Vegas
  • Miami
  • Milwaukee
  • Nashville
  • Orlando
  • Phoenix
  • Portland (OR)
  • Richmond
  • Sacramento
  • Salt Lake City
  • West Palm Beach
Little Fall River, Massachusetts, one of the nation's largest cities in early Censuses (along with Jebediah's Corners, Vermont, New Brokenwind, Maine, and Scrumpox, Connecticut) is larger than:
  • Asheville
  • Charlotte (!)
  • Colorado Springs
  • El Paso
  • Fort Wayne
  • Fresno
  • Greenville
  • Huntsville
  • Las Vegas (!)
  • Little Rock
  • MIdland / Odessa
  • Mobile
  • Orlando (!)
  • South Bend
  • Winston-Salem
Raleigh isn't even on the list, but the little Durham metro (population 116,000) makes an appearance.
 

Maister

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Meanwhile, in the United States, back in 1850. I'd like to see where the states rank for the percentage of the population that's "insane" and "idiotic".

View attachment 48598

"I see you didn't support the National Banking, Tariff, and Chewing Tobacco Acts of 1841, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, and 1849. Surely you must be an idiot."
Remember how old timey intelligence tests used to have official IQ categories like 'moron' 'imbecile' as well as 'idiot'? They really needed to update this practice. Nowadays I expect we should include 'dumb ass' 'dip shit' 'head tucked up his/her ass'
 
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Planit

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Remember how old timey intelligence tests used to have official IQ categories like 'moron' 'imbecile' as well as 'idiot'? They really needed to update this practice. Nowadays I expect we should include 'dumb ass' 'dip shit' 'head tucked up his/her ass'
...& Hairy Cheeto.
 

michaelskis

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Raleigh isn't even on the list, but the little Durham metro (population 116,000) makes an appearance.
In 1960, Raleigh only had 92,000 people. Today, the City has over 500,000 within corporate limits and over a million in the county.


With the old charts and graphs, it seems they were often colored after the fact to make them more legible. The lines on graphs were a combination of dashes, dots, and lines but with color pencils, they seemed to come to life. I have a copy of old ward map of Grand Rapids that was also colored in to help show contract between the different wards.
 

DVD

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If you're thinking Raleigh is bad, look at Phoenix. 800k to 5th largest in the nation - That's right, screw you Philly. The Census will prove it.
 
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Dan

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Remember how old timey intelligence tests used to have official IQ categories like 'moron' 'imbecile' as well as 'idiot'? They really needed to update this practice. Nowadays I expect we should include 'dumb ass' 'dip shit' 'head tucked up his/her ass'
I knew I'd get the opportunity to post this chart.

feeble minded.jpg
 

Super Amputee Cat

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Best Selling Magazines 1966, 1971, 2001, 2018

It's interesting to see the changes in the ranks of top circulating magazines over a period of 50+ years.

- Readers Digest was the Top Circulating Magazine in the 1960s and 1970s, with 17+ million copies printed. Now it is 15th with publication numbers barely 15% of those peak dates.

-Playboy was the 11th best selling magazine in 1973. Even as late as 2001 it still sold millions of copies and was in the Top 20. Now it's not on the list at all (albeit trunkated). According to Wikipedia, Playboy's print circulation had dropped to 320,000 by 2017 and ceased publication in 2020.

-Life Magazine, once the 5th most popular magazine with over 7 millions copies sold in 1968, has been out of publication for 20 years.

-Now the top 2 magazines are both AARP but they really shouldn't count. Unlike most of the other magazines, you can't get them at the newsstand. They come with an AARP membership. So really the defacto top selling magazine should be Better Homes and Gardens

-Better Homes and Gardens, in circulation for almost 100 years, is one of the few publications that has held it's own for over 50 years. It's circulation in 1967 was just over 7 million that year and it still sells well over 7 million today.

-TV Guide was the Number 2 Magazine for 2001 and perhaps a few years later, still selling more than 9 million copies. But now thanks to the internet, it's circulation had dropped to 1.3 million and barely cracked the Top 50. In fact,

-Game Informer Magazine at #4? I have never even heard of it.

World Almanac 1968 (160a) Magazines.jpgWorld Almanac 1973 (340a) Magazines.jpgWorld Almanac 2003 (274a) Magazines.jpgWorld Almanac 2018 (248a) Magazines.jpg
 

WSU MUP Student

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This one ca. 1910 still lives in Newark City Hall. Directional north is to the right. My 'hood is the one marked "Italians" in the middle of the map. It's 70% Latino and 25% Black. The Italians only come back in the fall for the Feast of St. Gerard at St. Lucy's Parish.

I wonder what the reasoning was behind the oddball orientation of the map was? Just somebody didn't want to deal with making north point north and possibly needing a non-standard sized sheet of paper?

The county I work for is basically a square. I think I'm going to start just adjusting every map I make about 15º clockwise from now on... give us a bit of a diamond shape. Classy!
 

Dan

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I wonder what the reasoning was behind the oddball orientation of the map was? Just somebody didn't want to deal with making north point north and possibly needing a non-standard sized sheet of paper?
I've come across a bunch of upside-down maps of Niagara Falls, New York -- south is north, and north is south. I don;t know why this is so common with maps of Niagara Falls; maybe some kind of up = upstream, down = downstream protocol cartographers did in olden times? Here's an example of of one I've seen.

upside down niagara falls.jpg
 

Dan

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40 years ago in Buffalo ...

racial breakdown of neighborhoods 02.png

FWIW, I grew up in the University / Northeast area. My parents stayed there until 1992.
 

mendelman

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Dan - that's a very binary chart.

Where are the "Polish" and "Italian" numbers?

:oops:
 
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Dan

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These is the strangest old-timey representations of weather I've come across. The war weather pendulum just seems wrong. I have no idea what to make of the second graphic, but I find the choice of cities interesting. Buffalo used to be much more closely connected with cities and regions to the west than it is now.

war weather pendulum.jpg
 
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