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The unemployed planner support thread

Arnold

Cyburbian
Messages
51
Points
4
I have not quite entered the job market just yet. I know things are bad with this eternal recession. But, I have this little glimmer of hope... that once the Baby Boomers all retire en mass there will be jobs aplenty. In my mind they are putting off retirement because of the bad economy, insurance, low S.S. etc. But they cant hold on for too much longer right? Those jobs will need to be filled and there will be an eager cohort of workers to jump in willing to pay that Social Security tax for all those retirees . So that is my light at the end of the tunnel story.

How realistic is this? Do you think Baby Boomers are holding on to jobs that in decades before would already have gone to younger generations? Not only in planning but all other fields?
 

nrschmid

Cyburbian
Messages
2,857
Points
20
How realistic is this? Do you think Baby Boomers are holding on to jobs that in decades before would already have gone to younger generations? Not only in planning but all other fields?

The Great Recession forced existing businesses to clean house permanently and eliminate plenty of positions. Those jobs will not come back. They extend from service-based jobs that didn't require college degrees (positions held by employees for years if not decades), some types of manufacturing jobs, and even licensed jobs (lawyers, engineers, etc.). As for planning, plenty of public agencies may need to meet, or attempt to meet, pension/retirement fund obligations before going on any kind of hiring spree. Hiring is picking again, but you also need to factor how many jobs were cut over the length of the recession as a ratio to the number of new positions opening at the same employer. They are not the same. People don't hold on to jobs to kick others out. Plenty of people lost their retirement savings/401ks forcing them to hold on to their job, at whatever cost. At the same, plenty of people in unrelated professions decided to go back to school during the Great Recession to change careers. Urban planning careers were promoted, if not, over-hyped. School enrollment increased at the same time there were massive layoffs. Now, there is still a huge glut of would-be planners fresh out of college and graduate school. I think it might improve over time. However, it is entirely contingent upon public funds AND planning is not considered essential compared to police, fire, etc. The next recession will lead to more layoffs, but hopefully as not as bad this past one (fingers crossed).
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
14,696
Points
38
I have not quite entered the job market just yet. I know things are bad with this eternal recession. But, I have this little glimmer of hope... that once the Baby Boomers all retire en mass there will be jobs aplenty. In my mind they are putting off retirement because of the bad economy, insurance, low S.S. etc. But they cant hold on for too much longer right? Those jobs will need to be filled and there will be an eager cohort of workers to jump in willing to pay that Social Security tax for all those retirees . So that is my light at the end of the tunnel story.

How realistic is this? Do you think Baby Boomers are holding on to jobs that in decades before would already have gone to younger generations? Not only in planning but all other fields?
I think it is very realistic. Baby Boomers are the largest segment of planners. In 5-10 years they will all be well beyond retirement age, and will leave the workforce. That will lead to a huge upward movement in the planning profession. Many will say otherwise, but those of us who aren't retiring in the next 10 years must continue to push for them to retire.

If we saw the economy turn around, I think it would be a mass exodus. Many people are sticking around too long because they are worried about making it through their whole retirement. Many though have pensions and really should just retire, but won't.

I will retire at 55 so there is opportunity for young planners of the future... ;) Or at least that is one of the reasons....
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,560
Points
36
I came into the planning game late, but I expect to retire when I'm 65 or 67, whenever I get the social security, pension, and whatever else I have.
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,868
Points
38
I've been quietly reading this thread for the past couple of years...but from a hiring perspective, I haven't seen the "deluge" of applications when I've had 2 positions vacant in the past year and a half.

When I was hiring for an entry level position (salary around $50K), I got 13 applicants...

Over the past couple of months I advertised for a mid-level position (salary range of $56-74K) and only got 10 applicants....

I'd like to think that the salaries are competitive for the the region...but yet I didn't see any flood of applications.

On the flip side...2 years ago I advertised for a part time administrative assistant position, and got 35 applications.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,433
Points
26
I have not quite entered the job market just yet. I know things are bad with this eternal recession. But, I have this little glimmer of hope... that once the Baby Boomers all retire en mass there will be jobs aplenty. In my mind they are putting off retirement because of the bad economy, insurance, low S.S. etc. But they cant hold on for too much longer right? Those jobs will need to be filled and there will be an eager cohort of workers to jump in willing to pay that Social Security tax for all those retirees . So that is my light at the end of the tunnel story.

How realistic is this? Do you think Baby Boomers are holding on to jobs that in decades before would already have gone to younger generations? Not only in planning but all other fields?
I don't think it is realistic, and I am just keep it real here. Take my organization. We have had a slew of retirements in the past year. Have we replaced their positions? No. The CM actually eliminated 2 of 3 positions. Local governments will continue for the foreseeable future remain small and lean. Not to say that when the boomers retire those of us already in the profession won't move up, but it won't create this deluge at the bottom for those students and newbies (and by newbies I mean folks with under 2 years of experience) to pick up jobs.

As Nick said and as CC has pointed out, the universities are churning out way too many graduates for the amount of jobs that are available. Sure as the economy picks up the private sector will hire, but I just don't think that schools are churning out graduates that can "cut it" there. Dreams crush, hopes are gone and soon those aspiring planners disappear doing something else.
 

Backstrom

Cyburbian
Messages
116
Points
6
I've been quietly reading this thread for the past couple of years...but from a hiring perspective, I haven't seen the "deluge" of applications when I've had 2 positions vacant in the past year and a half.

When I was hiring for an entry level position (salary around $50K), I got 13 applicants...

Over the past couple of months I advertised for a mid-level position (salary range of $56-74K) and only got 10 applicants....

I'd like to think that the salaries are competitive for the the region...but yet I didn't see any flood of applications.

On the flip side...2 years ago I advertised for a part time administrative assistant position, and got 35 applications.
What the fiddlesticks? This does not match my experience at all. Of many jobs I applied to last year, the standard applicant pool was around 90-100. The job I was eventually offered also had a pool of about 100. Were these positions openly advertised?
 

beach_bum

Cyburbian
Messages
3,427
Points
20
Honestly the majority of the jobs are in 'growing' metro areas. We have a state-wide list serv and just this week 6 jobs were posted on it. I have definitely noticed an uptick in entry-level positions (at least around here). The mid to senior levels is where things are currently not as great. I have been looking to move up for the past 2 years and there has been very little available. Probably will be re-locating for my next job.
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,868
Points
38
What the fiddlesticks? This does not match my experience at all. Of many jobs I applied to last year, the standard applicant pool was around 90-100. The job I was eventually offered also had a pool of about 100. Were these positions openly advertised?
Advertised on the web, newspapers, APA Chapter websites (Northern New England and MassAPA), state association website, State Office of Energy & Planning website, and certainly not least of all, here on Cyburbia.
 

jwhitty

Cyburbian
Messages
135
Points
6
I'm probably biased on this, but take it for what it is worth.

Imagine this as a map of where the planning jobs will be located in the future:


Imagine this as a cost based analysis of when select spatial areas will need planners:


If you need employment this summer and can't find anything, do VISTA in Appalachia and you will most likely be a planner by fall. I wish I had done that last year. The activity and range of work opportunities is astounding.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
7,326
Points
30
I've been quietly reading this thread for the past couple of years...but from a hiring perspective, I haven't seen the "deluge" of applications when I've had 2 positions vacant in the past year and a half.

When I was hiring for an entry level position (salary around $50K), I got 13 applicants...

Over the past couple of months I advertised for a mid-level position (salary range of $56-74K) and only got 10 applicants....

I'd like to think that the salaries are competitive for the the region...but yet I didn't see any flood of applications.

On the flip side...2 years ago I advertised for a part time administrative assistant position, and got 35 applications.
That is absolutely shocking. Those salaries seem very competitive both within your region and nationally (excluding those cities with cost of living in the nosebleed seats). I wonder if people just aren't willing to relocate to your area? I don't totally understand why that would be either though--you've got great access to recreation opportunities & a good quality of life. Cost of living is reasonable. You've got recognized planning schools within reasonable distance, plus connections to your alma mater... I don't get it. I've seen your job postings, so I know the message is getting out there.

My guess is that this is a symptom of job seekers limiting their search area, possibly restricting themselves to places that are "hip & happinin'" planning meccas or major metros.
 

Vancity

Cyburbian
Messages
1,049
Points
13
That is absolutely shocking. Those salaries seem very competitive both within your region and nationally (excluding those cities with cost of living in the nosebleed seats). I wonder if people just aren't willing to relocate to your area? I don't totally understand why that would be either though--you've got great access to recreation opportunities & a good quality of life. Cost of living is reasonable. You've got recognized planning schools within reasonable distance, plus connections to your alma mater... I don't get it. I've seen your job postings, so I know the message is getting out there.

My guess is that this is a symptom of job seekers limiting their search area, possibly restricting themselves to places that are "hip & happinin'" planning meccas or major metros.
Does ANYBODY who wants to stay in just one city for their whole lives pull it off? I took an interest in planning because I love my city. I have zero desire to leave, not even for the best job in the world. I'm hoping this will change as I get older and I will wake up one day and not care about where I have to live..

but I mean honestly, really, can't it be done? :-c
 

Masswich

Cyburbian
Messages
1,303
Points
23
Does ANYBODY who wants to stay in just one city for their whole lives pull it off? I took an interest in planning because I love my city. I have zero desire to leave, not even for the best job in the world. I'm hoping this will change as I get older and I will wake up one day and not care about where I have to live..

but I mean honestly, really, can't it be done? :-c
I don't know about one city but a lot of New Englanders want to stay in New England. Our city is an attractive place to live and work so we get a decent set of applicants for vacant positions. Our pay isn't quite what it could be but some people take the "I want to live here" discount. On the other hand, if you really want to stay in one specific metro area your whole life as a planner, this is probably a bit too small a pond. So we get people who come here mid-career and stay the rest of the way through (either here or at another job in the metro) or early grads who come and may move on if their career calls for it.

We get a lot of applicants for positions, but only a small set of "true" applicants. For a recent vacancy, we got about 75 applications, of which about 20-25 were even close to being qualified. Of those, half were not serious about moving (in my estimation) and some of the other half had baggage or were not really willing to take the salary we could offer.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
9,564
Points
30
Does ANYBODY who wants to stay in just one city for their whole lives pull it off? I took an interest in planning because I love my city. I have zero desire to leave, not even for the best job in the world. I'm hoping this will change as I get older and I will wake up one day and not care about where I have to live..

but I mean honestly, really, can't it be done? :-c
Here in suburban Detroit, I know quite a few people in planning and development who might not stay in one city for their entire career but they do manage to stay in one region. At the county level (which is where I work) we have a few people in my office who have done basically their entire careers here, including some in supervisory and director positions.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,549
Points
22
What the fiddlesticks? This does not match my experience at all. Of many jobs I applied to last year, the standard applicant pool was around 90-100. The job I was eventually offered also had a pool of about 100. Were these positions openly advertised?
I'm with you. I'd been diligently searching for a job for over a year and a half. In that time, almost every interviewer told me there was close to 100 applicants for the position.
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
6,241
Points
26
Does ANYBODY who wants to stay in just one city for their whole lives pull it off? I took an interest in planning because I love my city. I have zero desire to leave, not even for the best job in the world. I'm hoping this will change as I get older and I will wake up one day and not care about where I have to live..

but I mean honestly, really, can't it be done? :-c
I did it. One of the reasons why is that I am committed to making the place I grew up better and was always fascinated by how some areas seemed to flourish while other parts foundered. As WSU mentioned, I do consider the City as a Region.
 

nrschmid

Cyburbian
Messages
2,857
Points
20
I think there is "some" indirect correlation between shale plays and economic development. First, proven oil reserves, where oil and gas have been discovered, are extracted within the play and sent elsewhere, sometimes over thousands of miles to be refined in other areas. The demand for new jobs in a shale play itself, or in other areas that have OG industries, might lead to indirect economic development opportunities within an area. The regulatory climate with regards to land use development varies significantly across the country. Shale plays located within more densely populated areas in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York, etc. (states which also have a long history of local government involvement in general) are more likely to have a stronger say in the construction and operation of OG facilities. Most of the shale plays in Texas, Oklahoma, Wyoming, and Colorado are not located near any major city. In Texas, oil and gas is regulated by the Texas Railroad Commission (a very misleading name since it has nothing to do with railroads anymore). I think there is much more of a prospector approach to striking it rich here in the Lone Star State. Planning plays a non-existent role (although that's not necessarily a bad thing either provided it still meets environmental requirements). Just my two cents.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
7,326
Points
30
Does ANYBODY who wants to stay in just one city for their whole lives pull it off? I took an interest in planning because I love my city. I have zero desire to leave, not even for the best job in the world. I'm hoping this will change as I get older and I will wake up one day and not care about where I have to live..

but I mean honestly, really, can't it be done? :-c
It can, but it ain't easy and you have to accept that you'll potentially miss career opportunities. If you value staying in one place over career opportunity, then that's fine. I've made a decision to stay within the region. I've still advanced, but not as much as I potentially could have if I had pursued some other opportunities. Every job I've had over my 11 year planning career and even going back into my college & high school days has been within 30 miles of my current home. HOWEVER, I was able to pull that off in the boom times circa 2003-2004, which was a much different economic climate and in a geographic locale that has been experiencing rapid growth for several decades. There are several people like me in the region, including some that have spent their entire 30+ year career within the region. I even know a couple that have been at the same municipal employer that whole time, which is unheard of.
 

Vancity

Cyburbian
Messages
1,049
Points
13
Here in suburban Detroit, I know quite a few people in planning and development who might not stay in one city for their entire career but they do manage to stay in one region. At the county level (which is where I work) we have a few people in my office who have done basically their entire careers here, including some in supervisory and director positions.
Yeah I should have said "region".. I consider the entire region to be part of the city, despite there being 23 municipalities in the area. I'm often scolded for this assumption :r:

It can, but it ain't easy and you have to accept that you'll potentially miss career opportunities. If you value staying in one place over career opportunity, then that's fine.
This is what I was thinking. Seems like most careers are like this.

I did it. One of the reasons why is that I am committed to making the place I grew up better and was always fascinated by how some areas seemed to flourish while other parts foundered. As WSU mentioned, I do consider the City as a Region.
Yes, this. For me planning is a door to understanding my city.. and hopefully influencing its improvement.
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,896
Points
26
If there is wet gas there, they will come for it. You can either do value added near the site, or just do extraction and lose the economic impact.
A) No $ for planning jobs
B) Fracking banned in New York State since 2008 (officially, a moratorium is in effect pending further study)
C) No $ for oversight in the state budget
 

HomerJ

Cyburbian
Messages
1,044
Points
15
For what it's worth, when I lived in Chicago I had no intention of ever moving away, especially not to Texas. Since making the move, I have no intention of moving back to Chicago (and that's saying a lot because most Chicagoans are totally convinced that Chicago is the center of the universe).

In a lot of ways, moving around and seeing new places provided a lot of perspective on where I'm from.
 

wmtcook

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
I subscribed to this thread years ago but frankly avoided it because I didn't want to be sucked into a black hole of negativity.
I am one of those people who transitioned to planning mid-career/life. I had some non-profit planning related gigs towards the end of grad school, and after grad school. Wanted to get into public sector planning, but I concluded that just wasn't going to happen in the major metro where I'd lived for nearly 20 years. I got word that a low-level position I applied for in my small city had 257 applicants, and that was typical. If you live in a desirable geographic area, there is no real hometown advantage because there are a million other more experienced planners out there who want to live there too.

I had a 15 month gig with a consulting firm, which really wasn't in my area of interest, but it was an excellent experience to build my skill set. Also, I got that job via connections which traced back to a studio project in school, so as they say, networking counts. It helps to stay in touch with people. I ultimately decided that I wanted to get my career moving on my terms, and would need to step outside my comfort zone, which meant a geographic move. A good opportunity came up in a small city about two hours away. I like it a lot, and really enjoy working in a smaller department. You have a lot more autonomy and the ability to work on a broad range of tasks, and interface with a lot more people. If I'd gotten a muni job near my former location, it likely would have been for a larger city or county, and I'd be pigeonholed into the same repetive drudgery day after day. I do miss the amenities that a more urban area offers, and the easy walkability and transit access of my former locale, but I'm happy with my new job and am doing all the kinds of things I had envisioned I would in this career. I'm friendly with everybody in city staff from the cleaning lady on up to the city manager, and its nice to not to deal with the workplace drama, power plays and mind games you find in bigger places.

My advice: don't get too comfortable, step outside your comfort zone, network, don't burn bridges. Also, be strategic and realistic about sending resumes & applications. They can suck up a huge amount of time. Also, practice interviewing. I had not interviewed in a long time, and the recent experiences I had were weird and frustrating initially.
 

jwhitty

Cyburbian
Messages
135
Points
6
A) No $ for planning jobs
B) Fracking banned in New York State since 2008 (officially, a moratorium is in effect pending further study)
C) No $ for oversight in the state budget
I think you are misconstruing what I posted. I didn't note those places would necessarily hold jobs today, I said "Imagine this as a map of where the planning jobs will be located in the future." But you inadvertently proved my point. If NY doesn't currently allow drilling, there are obviously opportunities for planning practitioners to work within the industry to find ways to permit drilling. IMO planning is more than just working for a government body.
 

ginnaa

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
I'm having no luck finding any planning internships. I'm applying all over the US, even in smaller cities. I graduated with a BS in Planning and Sustainability from ASU, but I think one of my major problems is that I do not have any connections (didn't keep in contact with professors) and I don't have any previous experience Does anyone have any advice on what I should do?
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,433
Points
26
I'm having no luck finding any planning internships. I'm applying all over the US, even in smaller cities. I graduated with a BS in Planning and Sustainability from ASU, but I think one of my major problems is that I do not have any connections (didn't keep in contact with professors) and I don't have any previous experience Does anyone have any advice on what I should do?
First question is: Why are you applying all over the US? My organization has an internship listed, however if anyone out of the area applied, I more than likely would not even consider because of the pay, and other factors. So with that said:

a) Have you asked any local agencies or firms if they are looking for interns, even if they are not advertised?
b) Set up informal interviews to inquire about possible paid or unpaid internships?
c) If they are unpaid, then can you get a source of revenue from another job?
d) Have you thought about networking through your local apa chapter or ULI chapter etc?
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,560
Points
36
First question is: Why are you applying all over the US? My organization has an internship listed, however if anyone out of the area applied, I more than likely would not even consider because of the pay, and other factors. So with that said:

a) Have you asked any local agencies or firms if they are looking for interns, even if they are not advertised?
b) Set up informal interviews to inquire about possible paid or unpaid internships?
c) If they are unpaid, then can you get a source of revenue from another job?
d) Have you thought about networking through your local apa chapter or ULI chapter etc?
There is a paid internship position open with the Sonoran Institute
http://www.planning.org/jobs/search/listing/?AdID=48227

You can call some of the city planning departments and they can give you an unpaid internship. I know Surprise does it, Glendale might, and I'm sure a lot of the other would be willing to work with you.
MAG usually has a couple internships every year, so does Phoenix, but the Phoenix ones are usually more competitive and more management related.

The AZAPA conference is in September, plug into that and meet a bunch of people.
Arizona State usually does an internship mixer with the AZAPA, another place to see some great companies. Call the AZAPA, they might know when the next one is.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,078
Points
33
What Raf said. Most places will not consider a person from outside of the area because an internship is limited term and does not pay significantly. But they might be more open if you can explain why you are applying there in a convincing way. For example, you want to learn about rural planning issues in the mountain west or you plan to move to the beautiful Ottumwa metro region after graduation. Be specific about why and where. This is also a case in which a call to the employer can help.
 

chocolatechip

Cyburbian
Messages
852
Points
15
You have X amount of energy. That X amount can be spent applying to hundreds of jobs across the country, or spent focusing, researching, and targeting a few key local places for internships. Internships are very much an insider's game, so personal connections and faces mean a lot. That's why you're not getting any bites applying all over the place.
 

Dharmster

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
So this board hasn't see a lot of action lately. But just to let everyone know it's still terrible out there. I recently moved to a large metropolitan area for my spouse. Lots of planning and development going on here. I have a master's degree and experience in transportation planning. I've been looking for almost a year. Applied to about 70 positions most of which I was qualified for. 1 interview. 1/70. I got more interviews straight out of grad school at the depths of the recession. My theory is with the economy a little better, more experienced planner are comfortable looking for other jobs. Fun times!
Almost seventeen years of experience. AICP and CTP as well as another certifications, two masters degrees, industry award and. After three and a half months of being unemployed, about a half dozen short lists and three interviews (actually more but interviewed for three positions) but no job. So yeah, it is still very very tough.
 

kltoomians

Cyburbian
Messages
241
Points
9
Out of State/First Jobs

I disagree with towns not hiring people from out of state. Our office in CA hired people straight out of grad school with very little practical experience. Some are from the Midwest, and some are from Canada. I had a two year stint out of state during the recession, and was able to make my way back. My advice to newbies is cast a wide net for your first job...put in your time, and move on. Sadly you'll more than likely will have to work in either a dumpy town or somewhere rural before working somewhere that you can see yourself settling down.
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
6,241
Points
26
There seems to be a beginning of some job churn here in Michigan. It is mostly being created by folks leaving the field either through retirements or just giving up!

I agree it is still bad, but it is not as bad as it was. Of course that is of little solace to those still trying.
 

Dharmster

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
Does everyone now have a job?

Just wondering because it has been six weeks since anyone has posted to this forum.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
29
Yeah......

Just wondering because it has been six weeks since anyone has posted to this forum.
Today will be one full year for me.....not in a traditional planning job, but it involves GIS and a lot of program planning review and support.....so close enough:D
 

miser

Member
Messages
22
Points
2
still can't find a job

It has been officially a year now since I became unemployed.
Can't help to feel depressed...
How to network if I don't have ANY connection here? I don't want to go back to school. I'm already a master in planning and I don't want to go for phd...:(
 

Dharmster

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
Six month anniversary of being laid off is early October for me. I've never ever been unemployed by choice before and that's based on working for almost 17 years.
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
Messages
1,294
Points
24
I received a rejection letter yesterday from a city here in Michigan. I didn't remember sending them an application until I saw the letter. The letter was dated Sept. 19, but it took until yesterday the 29th to arrive because I've changed my address!
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,560
Points
36
I'd invite you all down to Kansas, but the pay isn't the best and well...it's Kansas. Oklahoma seems to be hiring a lot too, but that's not any better.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,549
Points
22
I received a rejection letter yesterday from a city here in Michigan. I didn't remember sending them an application until I saw the letter. The letter was dated Sept. 19, but it took until yesterday the 29th to arrive because I've changed my address!
I received a rejection letter from a municipality last week; I accepted a position in January and looked back in my records -- I applied for them last November. WOW!
 

Dharmster

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
I too received a rejection letter in September for a job I applied for back in June with a county government.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
29
Ha!

A year after losing my last job I started getting notices from State Agencies I had applied for in California.....really???:-c
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
Messages
1,294
Points
24
I had a pretty good interview this morning and I got a call this afternoon from another municipality. I have another interview next week.
 

MV1138

Cyburbian
Messages
31
Points
2
So is the marketing starting to turn around or what? I'm still interested in potentially going for a second Master's (this time in planning) to break into that field, but have worried it's a dead field.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,433
Points
26
So is the marketing starting to turn around or what? I'm still interested in potentially going for a second Master's (this time in planning) to break into that field, but have worried it's a dead field.
It usually helps to have a grammatically correct sentence when seeking jobs ;) Market is still tight for certain regions (coastal regions and major urban areas) but it is un-thawing. As older folks retire with the improving economy, lower level folks move up and the entry level opens back up. Keep options open and have quality internships and a network and you will be okay with a wide-net casted for a job anywhere.
 

Gildor777

Member
Messages
10
Points
0
It took me the summer, but I got a job in NYC in the private market. In my job searching, I actually found that the public sector was willing to accept less exp. than the private sector (most practicing planners said they experienced the opposite). Either way, I think there are a large number of jobs out there. At least in NYS, the DOT is hiring again after a 4 year freeze, and my company has multiple openings for Jr. level planners.
 
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