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The unemployed planner support thread

MV1138

Cyburbian
Messages
30
Points
2
It usually helps to have a grammatically correct sentence when seeking jobs ;) Market is still tight for certain regions (coastal regions and major urban areas) but it is un-thawing. As older folks retire with the improving economy, lower level folks move up and the entry level opens back up. Keep options open and have quality internships and a network and you will be okay with a wide-net casted for a job anywhere.
I typed that out on my phone using a Swype keyboard. It's far less intuitive than my old one, which wasn't that good to begin with. The joy of cell phones.

Glad to hear it's thawing a bit. I really can't shake the desire to get a second masters in this. I have no career options right now, I live in an area where the local planning departments do very little (I've tried contacting all of them within a 40 minute drive) and don't need volunteers or interns. Heck, one of the towns of 55,000 people doesn't even have a planning department. Yet one with 30,000 nearby does, go figure. But that cost of school, the years spent studying and the cost of moving (because there are no affordable programs in my state) are all giving me a LOT of pause considering how tight things have been. I want to know I'll have a job that pays at least $40,000 at the end of this.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,238
Points
33
If you plan on moving a $40k job should be easy enough, but as you found out local jobs are already taken.
 

Dharmster

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
If you plan on moving a $40k job should be easy enough, but as you found out local jobs are already taken.
I wish it was that easy. The last time I made $40K a year was over 15 years ago. I have had some interviews, and one potential employer checked references earlier in the month, so I'm hopeful. Still, I think it's still pretty rough out there for experienced planners (15+ years).
 

Simon Saez

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
I realize this discussion is quite old, but I could not agree more about the economy being horrible. I graduated a couple of years ago with a planning degree and still have yet to be given a serious chance at any decent, stable job.

I am sick and tired of those in older generations acting as though unemployed gen Yers and millennials are to blame for their unfortunate circumstances. The bar has really gotten low, as evidenced by the proliferation in unpaid internships post-graduation. The elite class acts as though working is such a wonderful thing in and of itself that we should be grateful to work for free and get to be in the presence of real planners. Expecting to be able to feed yourself and have a roof over one's head and support one's family is considered "exorbitant, greedy, selfish, inappropriate" by the very same people for whom a 10 million dollar salary is just "business as usual."

It seems like the working class is held to a different, more stringent standard than the elites are, when it comes to what is "greedy" and what isn't.

I am at least thankful that I have parents generous enough to let me live with them, and thankful that I have had time to reflect on the problems of poverty in American society such that I am much more outspoken on issues of social justice and economic democracy than I would be if I had some job I was worried I could lose at any moment for something as minor as opposing economic injustice.
 

Simon Saez

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
You expect to get a job in a very competitive field but you don't feel entitled? Many people in your position take a job to pay their bills and keep looking for work in the field. You have options but you feel entitled to a planning job.

I commend you for your perseverance but thinking no other generation understands what you are going through is very short sighted. There are many people on these boards that have worked hard, paid their dues and through no fault of their own got laid off and have to find work doing non planning jobs to pay their bills.

You are very special with your two degrees, some minor planning work, all of your very marketable skills, an internship and a ton of interviews. :r:
As bad as low-wage work is, some, like myself, are not even lucky enough to find something like fast-food or retail. Why is it selfish to expect to be paid enough to live comfortably?
 

Alan Minor

Member
Messages
15
Points
1
I realize this discussion is quite old, but I could not agree more about the economy being horrible. I graduated a couple of years ago with a planning degree and still have yet to be given a serious chance at any decent, stable job.
If you don't mind me asking: where did you go to school? And what is the market for planners like in Birmingham?

I'm a Birmingham native, and I hope to move back home once I've gotten a planning degree and established a planning career.
 

Simon Saez

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
If you don't mind me asking: where did you go to school? And what is the market for planners like in Birmingham?

I'm a Birmingham native, and I hope to move back home once I've gotten a planning degree and established a planning career.
I attended Auburn University. The planning program lost its accreditation earlier this year.

The market is not very good in Alabama in general, but being near one of the major cities is of course preferable...I live outside the immediate Birmingham vicinity, so an unpaid internship there is not possible, as I do not have parents with the ability (or desire) to pay for me to travel 2+ hours each for no pay.

Are you currently in planning school?

I would like to think that Birmingham would have a lot of planning-related work in the next couple of decades, given that the city's infrastructure has endured years of neglect and the population has likely started to rise again. But as we all know, just because government needs to spend funds on something does not mean they will do so. If that were the case, all planners would be able to find work.
 

Alan Minor

Member
Messages
15
Points
1
I attended Auburn University. The planning program lost its accreditation earlier this year.

The market is not very good in Alabama in general, but being near one of the major cities is of course preferable...I live outside the immediate Birmingham vicinity, so an unpaid internship there is not possible, as I do not have parents with the ability (or desire) to pay for me to travel 2+ hours each for no pay.

Are you currently in planning school?

I would like to think that Birmingham would have a lot of planning-related work in the next couple of decades, given that the city's infrastructure has endured years of neglect and the population has likely started to rise again. But as we all know, just because government needs to spend funds on something does not mean they will do so. If that were the case, all planners would be able to find work.
Can you shoot me an email at firstname dot lastname at gmail dot com?
 

Dharmster

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
@ Simon, I agree that the job market is bad for young people, but as the original poster said for those willing to relocate their may be jobs to be had.

For senior level people, there aren't that many jobs advertised and the competition is INTENSE. I think I'm getting very close to getting a job, but I never, ever imagined I'd be unemployed for 8+ months.
 

Simon Saez

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
@ Simon, I agree that the job market is bad for young people, but as the original poster said for those willing to relocate their may be jobs to be had.

For senior level people, there aren't that many jobs advertised and the competition is INTENSE. I think I'm getting very close to getting a job, but I never, ever imagined I'd be unemployed for 8+ months.
That is interesting, because I have not received one interview among the dozens of non-local jobs for which I applied.

I agree that competition is probably very intense for more senior level planners, but getting the first entry-level planning gig is also pretty difficult these days. And that is certainly nothing unique to planning by any means.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,078
Points
33
Our profession is one with few openings, whether at the entry level or for more senior positions. For most of the 25 years I wave been working, this has been true. Trying to enter in the late 80's/early 90's was no different. Most jobs wanted a masters and two years of experience, and back then we did not have interwebs to help us locate more distant jobs in small, rural communities, that paid less but had less competition. You may need to broaden your definition of what you consider planning. My first non-interning gig was as a geographer with the Census Bureau. I used that to get subsequent gigs at a government policy research center and an economic development agency, which firmly launched my career.

Colleges, unfortunately, do a poor job of preparing students for a job search in planning. I believe they paint an unrealistic picture of the market, and of the kinds of work a freshly-minted planner is prepared to perform. An undergraduate degree is not adequate, especially when the program becomes overweighted with programs that are of a greater academic interest than of interest to potential employers. Students may even enjoy classes in social equity, food systems, or planning in third worlc countries, but an employer will roll their eyes. They are looking for someone who can review a site plan and write a clear, unbiased analysis. They will tend to be able to find that among many applicants with prior experience or a masters degree, or both. Simply having an undergraduate degree does not open doors. This has been true for at least a quarter century.

My advice is to first take a close look at your resume. Fill two thirds of it discussing pragmatic planning experience, and lose the references to esoteric, academic interests. Highlight the real planning experience you have, and don't give me a half page history of every retail, fast food, and landscaping job you worked through high school and college.

Second, broaden your search both in the way you define planning and in the geographic area in which you search. By the way, once you take that job in the federal bureaucracy, state government, etc., immediately start networking to get out of it. You don't want to have a career there. The same may or may not be true of small towns and rural places. Some can be quite nice.

Third, network, network, network.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,238
Points
33
I have to agree with Cardinal. Moving out of your comfort zone location wise gets you better chances at jobs. It got me bumped to a director job for a small county. There are lots of small towns looking for an entry level planner with very little competition over the job. Who knows, you might even like the small town. You can find jobs like that beyond just the APA website. Use chapter websites and find out how employment is advertised in the area. For Kansas a lot of stuff is done on a statewide government job board. Rural jobs don't have the advertising power of bigger cities so you have to search. Once you find a job, start up the networking with everyone you can and maintain any old networks you have. You never know where your next job lead will come from.

Good luck with the job hunt.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,379
Points
25
As bad as low-wage work is, some, like myself, are not even lucky enough to find something like fast-food or retail. Why is it selfish to expect to be paid enough to live comfortably?
If you can't find a retail job, then something is definitely wrong in either your resume or approach. I took on a 2nd job for some "fun money" during the summer. Dumbed down my resume and skills, got a call back working at a mind-numbing national clothing retailer for a killer discount.

For senior level people, there aren't that many jobs advertised and the competition is INTENSE. I think I'm getting very close to getting a job, but I never, ever imagined I'd be unemployed for 8+ months.
Yup, the level of compeition is very intense to move up. So far the last year I have applied for senior level positions, and have walked away interviewing 4/5 places, one job offer (rejected due to pay/location) and two 2nd interviews with no offer. After speaking with a planner who sat in on the interviews for one job, she mentioned I did nothing wrong and my resume and quals were stellar, but out of the 3 candidates they did final interviews, they could have hired any of them. It is just looking for a fit. I recommend follow ups. That is the best you can do. Follow up everything.

That is interesting, because I have not received one interview among the dozens of non-local jobs for which I applied.

I agree that competition is probably very intense for more senior level planners, but getting the first entry-level planning gig is also pretty difficult these days. And that is certainly nothing unique to planning by any means.
Again. What are you doing? What are your internships like? What is your resume like? Are you tailoring a resume or just sending off some piece of crap standard word doc? You have to sell yourself. If you are just sending off 50 resumes and cover letters that are the same, then it is like the equivalent of you being an rc cola when really I am looking for a Jones Pure Sugar Soda. As other states, you may need to get out of the comfort zone. Also, really have someone review your resume that you may not know. You need some feedback and you may just need to take it to move forward.

Case in point. Recently I interviewed for a senior planner position in my area. I didn't get called back for a 2nd interview. I asked the director for some feedback. He happily gave it and said while I looked good on paper, I just wasn't a fit for the organization because I came off a little too strong personality wise, and they were looking for someone more laid back. At first I was a little upset, because I am selling myself, but in hindsight, he was right. I could have answered questions in a much more effective manner and made my personality more of what it is day to day (laid back, jokester who know is planning stuff) versus stuffy know it all former consultant. All in all very productive outreach.

Good luck.
 

beach_bum

Cyburbian
Messages
3,427
Points
20
That is interesting, because I have not received one interview among the dozens of non-local jobs for which I applied.

I agree that competition is probably very intense for more senior level planners, but getting the first entry-level planning gig is also pretty difficult these days. And that is certainly nothing unique to planning by any means.
Are there any local alumni of your program that might be willing to take a look at your resume and give you some tips or at least network with? Are there any opportunities with the state planning organization to get involved? I know many state chapter are starting young planner groups. I would just say network, network, network if you are looking in a particular area and if your search is wider, definitely keep an open mind...lots of entry level stuff in NC lately.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,238
Points
33
Yup, the level of compeition is very intense to move up. So far the last year I have applied for senior level positions, and have walked away interviewing 4/5 places, one job offer (rejected due to pay/location) and two 2nd interviews with no offer. After speaking with a planner who sat in on the interviews for one job, she mentioned I did nothing wrong and my resume and quals were stellar, but out of the 3 candidates they did final interviews, they could have hired any of them. It is just looking for a fit. I recommend follow ups. That is the best you can do. Follow up everything.
I have to agree with the senior position thing. I tried for a couple key jobs over the last year just because I liked the location and ended up one of the many who were qualified. One I lost because they decided to hire internally the other I couldn't get feedback from, but I assume there must have been someone better.

The funny part, while I was working on my degree all the professors would tell us how easy it will be to move up when all the baby boomers retire. Let me know when that happens.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,379
Points
25
I have to agree with the senior position thing. I tried for a couple key jobs over the last year just because I liked the location and ended up one of the many who were qualified. One I lost because they decided to hire internally the other I couldn't get feedback from, but I assume there must have been someone better.

The funny part, while I was working on my degree all the professors would tell us how easy it will be to move up when all the baby boomers retire. Let me know when that happens.
The dinosaurs ;), i mean, current guard is slowly starting to retire and the move ups are happening, however the recession really did a number on this profession with a number of positions being eliminated. I don't want discourage the youths from applying and following their dreams, however municipal planning is most certainly a harder profession to break into post recession.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Moderator
Messages
12,238
Points
37
The dinosaurs ;), i mean, current guard is slowly starting to retire and the move ups are happening, however the recession really did a number on this profession with a number of positions being eliminated. I don't want discourage the youths from applying and following their dreams, however municipal planning is most certainly a harder profession to break into post recession.
Indeed. As for the boomers retiring, the recession, I believe delayed that for 5-8 years for much of the cohort.

The problem I'm seeing though is that when a boomers retires from a senior or director position, the responsibilities get combined under one position to reduce the high costs of such positions through six-sigma lean blah, blah, blah...

Good luck to those still searching.
 

beach_bum

Cyburbian
Messages
3,427
Points
20
Case in point. Recently I interviewed for a senior planner position in my area. I didn't get called back for a 2nd interview. I asked the director for some feedback. He happily gave it and said while I looked good on paper, I just wasn't a fit for the organization because I came off a little too strong personality wise, and they were looking for someone more laid back. At first I was a little upset, because I am selling myself, but in hindsight, he was right. I could have answered questions in a much more effective manner and made my personality more of what it is day to day (laid back, jokester who know is planning stuff) versus stuffy know it all former consultant. All in all very productive outreach.
Agreed, in my new position, a Senior position, I knew when I interviewed that it was a good fit from the start, especially after meeting everyone. There were some jobs that I applied for that I thought I was very qualified for and did not even get an interview for....the hardest part is getting the interview, so resume/cover letter are key!
 

Simon Saez

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
If you can't find a retail job, then something is definitely wrong in either your resume or approach. I took on a 2nd job for some "fun money" during the summer. Dumbed down my resume and skills, got a call back working at a mind-numbing national clothing retailer for a killer discount.
I see you are in the SF Bay Area. It is a completely different culture out there than in the deep south, where I live. Maybe people out there are more willing to hire those with bachelor's degrees (and higher) since there are way more college-educated people out there. Why would a retailer choose to hire someone with a master's degree (who in all likelihood will not stay) over someone with no education (for a job that requires none), when there are so many applicants without degrees (but with relevant experience) to choose from?

As far as my resume is concerned, if I leave off my degrees my resume essentially becomes one big gap -- not really ideal for improving one's chances of finding employment.

As far as planning jobs are concerned, I took a course in undergrad on writing resumes and cover letters, and I have had my resume viewed and approved by multiple professional people, so I doubt my resume is the problem. No, I don't do cookie cutter resumes and cover letters. I have known better than that since before I attended planning school. It seems to me that the problem is that entry-level planning jobs typically have 100+ applicants. However, I am not a prodigy, nor am I perfect, so it is difficult for me to stand out among that many competitors.
 

Simon Saez

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
Colleges, unfortunately, do a poor job of preparing students for a job search in planning. I believe they paint an unrealistic picture of the market, and of the kinds of work a freshly-minted planner is prepared to perform. An undergraduate degree is not adequate, especially when the program becomes overweighted with programs that are of a greater academic interest than of interest to potential employers. Students may even enjoy classes in social equity, food systems, or planning in third worlc countries, but an employer will roll their eyes. They are looking for someone who can review a site plan and write a clear, unbiased analysis. They will tend to be able to find that among many applicants with prior experience or a masters degree, or both. Simply having an undergraduate degree does not open doors. This has been true for at least a quarter century.
You got that right. One of my professors made it clear that she structured her exams to be like the AICP exam. Fair enough, but no mention was made of getting in a position so one has the necessary experience for AICP. So I spent part of my time in planning school preparing for an exam that I may never take, because I cannot get the necessary experience.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,238
Points
33
The only advice I can give you is to seek out more internships and apply to more rural areas, they have less competition. I've always said finding a job is a job in itself. If you're not spending 10-20 hours a week and sending out at least 5 resumes a week you're not trying hard enough. The sad truth is, work is out there, you just have to move to find it.
 

Kirbyjam

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
LA planning related recruitment companies

Hi does anyone know of any urban planning related recruitment companies operating in Los Angeles? I'm new here and am finding it hard to even track down companies which might be in a position to advise me of where to start focusing my job hunting.
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
Messages
1,292
Points
23
The unemployment train has arrived again

Well, here I am again. I was terminated on Friday, December 4th. I'm happy to say that I have a phone interview tomorrow.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,238
Points
33
If you're desperate I'll throw you a couple options in Kansas, but I think Mskies has your area covered.
 

Brocktoon

Cyburbian
Messages
3,728
Points
22
Well, here I am again. I was terminated on Friday, December 4th. I'm happy to say that I have a phone interview tomorrow.
Sorry to hear it...but good luck on the phone interview. There are a few planning positions open in Arizona. PM me if you have any questions.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
5,490
Points
25
I am not an unemployed planner, but I am a planner looking for new employment.

Is it bad to ask your current direct supervisor - who is aware and supportive of you looking for a job - to call the interviewing entity and give a recommendation? How does that look - from both sides?

Advice, please.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Moderator
Messages
7,304
Points
29
I am not an unemployed planner, but I am a planner looking for new employment.

Is it bad to ask your current direct supervisor - who is aware and supportive of you looking for a job - to call the interviewing entity and give a recommendation? How does that look - from both sides?

Advice, please.
I'm a little wary when I get cold-called by an applicant's supervisor. The only time it doesn't bother me is when it involves a supervisor that I know personally (so I know they aren't just trying to unload a problem).

I'll cold-call on behalf of my staff, but I've only done it twice. Both times, they were cases of the employees needing to relocate out of the region for personal/family reasons and I knew somebody that either had openings or could help facilitate a soft landing. I would do it if my employee was seeking a career advancement position not possible at my employer, but I've never had an employee ask for me to take that step.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Moderator
Messages
12,238
Points
37
I think a cold-call is a bit abrupt, but if I see your direct supervisor's name on the list of recommendations, than I would be looking favorably on you.

Though, for our recent Exec Dir search for our local downtown advocacy entity, one of the candidates unilaterally put his previous supervisor on the recommendation list without getting permission from the person first. It did not work in the candidate's favor as this former supervisor was the person that decided to let him go for less than ideal reasons.

So if your supervisor is happy to be a recommendation, go for it, but I would let it be passive versus proactive.

Good luck on the search, Sal.
 
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DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,238
Points
33
Happy hunting! Hopefully whatever is going on won't drive you too crazy.

I'd go with the passive reference too. Unless he/she knows someone like SR was talking about.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
10,956
Points
32
I am not an unemployed planner, but I am a planner looking for new employment.

Is it bad to ask your current direct supervisor - who is aware and supportive of you looking for a job - to call the interviewing entity and give a recommendation? How does that look - from both sides?

Advice, please.
the resurfacing of this thread freaked me out as I thought "oh no!!!"

so I am glad this is just looking for work

I agree with others - cold calls work if your supervisor knows the other person as a professional friend kind of thing - my first public sector job was helped by this cold call on my behalf

otherwise you can just list your supervisor as a reference which will hold a lot of water on its own as it immediately shows you are leaving on good terms
 

ARCAtect

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
Hello, Canadian Planner here. I have a Master of Urban Planning degree and Bachelors of Science degree in Architecture. It's been more than 2 years since I've graduated and I cant seem to find entry level work. Either planning positions have a 3 to 10 year exp requirement or positions I qualify for are very competitive. I have applied to large municipalities, small towns and private planning practices but haven't had much luck.

I've had over a dozen interviews. Including an interview with the City of Toronto's planning department. I've been told many times over that I have been selected for an interview out of hundreds of applicants. I'm confident in my skills but it's very nerve-wracking when I don't get the job.

My ideal planning job is to work for an organization where I can use my research skills that I obtained during my graduate studies as well as my technical skills I've learned in architectural industry (autocad, revit, sketchup, 3ds max). Positions that meet my criteria pop up from time to time but they are very rare.

Last year, I did find work with an Urban Design and Land Use Planning firm in Michigan. My position would have been as a Urban Designer but my Visa application rejected at the US Border. They argued the work I would have done does not meet the criteria of the NAFTA agreement. i tried to plead with them but they told me to not come back without a Lawyer (which would have been very expensive). I don't know if anybody else has ever had this problem.

I live in a municipality in Southern-eastern Ontario with zero opportunities for entry-level planners not even for Volunteer opportunities related to planning. I currently work as a freelance architectural designer and it helps pay the bills. But i have been completely stressed that it has been so long since ive started my job hunt. I feel like i'm at the end of my rope

Can anybody provide me with some advice? Any would be greatly appreciated.
 

OfficialPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
930
Points
22
Hello, Canadian Planner here. I have a Master of Urban Planning degree and Bachelors of Science degree in Architecture. It's been more than 2 years since I've graduated and I cant seem to find entry level work. Either planning positions have a 3 to 10 year exp requirement or positions I qualify for are very competitive. I have applied to large municipalities, small towns and private planning practices but haven't had much luck.

I've had over a dozen interviews. Including an interview with the City of Toronto's planning department. I've been told many times over that I have been selected for an interview out of hundreds of applicants. I'm confident in my skills but it's very nerve-wracking when I don't get the job.

My ideal planning job is to work for an organization where I can use my research skills that I obtained during my graduate studies as well as my technical skills I've learned in architectural industry (autocad, revit, sketchup, 3ds max). Positions that meet my criteria pop up from time to time but they are very rare.

Last year, I did find work with an Urban Design and Land Use Planning firm in Michigan. My position would have been as a Urban Designer but my Visa application rejected at the US Border. They argued the work I would have done does not meet the criteria of the NAFTA agreement. i tried to plead with them but they told me to not come back without a Lawyer (which would have been very expensive). I don't know if anybody else has ever had this problem.

I live in a municipality in Southern-eastern Ontario with zero opportunities for entry-level planners not even for Volunteer opportunities related to planning. I currently work as a freelance architectural designer and it helps pay the bills. But i have been completely stressed that it has been so long since ive started my job hunt. I feel like i'm at the end of my rope

Can anybody provide me with some advice? Any would be greatly appreciated.
I lived in Toronto for a good few years. Have you looked into the darkside? Seriously, there is probably a glut of recent grads and experienced professionals seeking municipal planning work in the Toronto area. That's why it's so competitive to land a public gig. However, there's tons of existing and start-up planning firms due to the development pressures in the metro area. And hey, the current Chief Planner for Toronto was a recruit from the darkside.
 

ARCAtect

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
I lived in Toronto for a good few years. Have you looked into the darkside? Seriously, there is probably a glut of recent grads and experienced professionals seeking municipal planning work in the Toronto area. That's why it's so competitive to land a public gig. However, there's tons of existing and start-up planning firms due to the development pressures in the metro area. And hey, the current Chief Planner for Toronto was a recruit from the darkside.
Hi and thanks for the response. I actually have never heard of the "darkside". Can you post a link for me? thanks.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Moderator
Messages
14,589
Points
37
Hi and thanks for the response. I actually have never heard of the "darkside". Can you post a link for me? thanks.
The darkside is planner talk for the private sector. Government agencies are one avenue, and the private sector is another. Developers, builders, and Planning Firms that do work for communities are other options.
 

Derek Lloyd

Cyburbian
Messages
36
Points
2
New Mayor gave me my walking papers Friday to make room for his new PD. Not entirely unexpected but still a bummer. Trying to see this as an opportunity.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Moderator
Messages
12,238
Points
37
New Mayor gave me my walking papers Friday to make room for his new PD. Not entirely unexpected but still a bummer. Trying to see this as an opportunity.
I work for a strong mayor City as well. Good luck on the job search.

PM your contact info and I'd be happy to pass along opportunities I come across that you may be interested in.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,238
Points
33
New Mayor gave me my walking papers Friday to make room for his new PD. Not entirely unexpected but still a bummer. Trying to see this as an opportunity.
that sucks! If you're looking to live in the middle of nowhere, I think there are a few Kansas jobs around.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,853
Points
24
I'm not really sure the unemployed thread is the place to be cracking jokes. I know some people appreciate levity in tough situations but as someone who has been laid off more than once through no fault of my own it was nice to get actual support here instead of wisecracks. But maybe that's just me.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
10,956
Points
32
I'm not really sure the unemployed thread is the place to be cracking jokes. I know some people appreciate levity in tough situations but as someone who has been laid off more than once through no fault of my own it was nice to get actual support here instead of wisecracks. But maybe that's just me.
True - sorry - though when I lost my job violently, I looked for humor anywhere I could but yes, it's devastating for sure
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
5,490
Points
25
Back in the job-hunting saddle

I left my Director post due to relocation. We are heading back to the DFW area - and I admit it is not my first choice. In fact, I'm not that thrilled with the moving timing, but Karma/God/Fate decided to gift Hubby with a great job - that he is settling into nicely! - but the location is DFW.

House is on the market, movers are coming soon, and I am on the hunt for a new position.

I'm looking at both public and private sectors, upper level, and I'm not picky about travel requirements at this time.

Any DFW Cyburbians out there - PM me if you're open to meeting for coffee or lunch some day after Memorial weekend. I want to catch up on local projects, opportunities, and gossip!
 

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
393
Points
11
Same as above

Similar post to poster above me - I'm relocating to Western PA for spousal reasons. My background is in transportation planning. Good luck to all the Cyburbians relocating!
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,853
Points
24
Similar post to poster above me - I'm relocating to Western PA for spousal reasons. My background is in transportation planning. Good luck to all the Cyburbians relocating!
I wish you luck. PA is notorious for incredibly low pay for planners. Definitely keep a look out for associated jobs because being a planner in PA is tough sledding.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,503
Points
27
Just a suggestion...

In my fair state :mi: it became clear that recreational marijuana was going to be approved. That's when I started seeing the occasional ad for zoning specialists who could obtain permits for dispensaries, grow farms, and other related uses. I went as far as to read some of their websites.

If you could stand to earn some decent money for a likely temporary gig, it might be worth looking into what's happening in your own state. (Don't get me started on the fact that banks, being FDIC, are unable to trade in pot revenue. At least when I worked for each of the cell phone carriers, there were checks, not cash payouts.)

Hope this helps someone.
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Returned to say that I appreciate this new software's flexibility. Now I can edit a glaring embarrassing typo which had gone unnoticed for many hours! Thanks Dan!
 
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